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  • 1.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The EU and the Recycling of Colonialism: Formation of Europeans through intercultural dialogue2012In: Educational Philosophy and Theory, ISSN 0013-1857, E-ISSN 1469-5812, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 1010-1023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present essay focuses on problematizing the European Union’s claim that interculturaldialogue constitutes an advocated method of talking through cultural boundaries—inside as wellas outside the classroom—based on mutual empathy and non-domination. More precisely, theaim is to analyze who is being constructed as counterparts of the intercultural dialogue throughthe discourse produced by the EU in policies on education, culture and intercultural dialogue.Within the Union, Europeans are portrayed as having an a priori historical existence, whilethe ones excluded from this notion are evoked to demonstrate its difference in comparison to theEuropean one.The results show that subjects not considered as Europeans serve as markers of themulticultural present of the space. Thus, intercultural dialogue seems to consolidate differencesbetween European and Other—the‘We’ and ‘Them’ in the dialogue—rather than, as in line withits purpose, bringing subjects together.

  • 2.
    Horton, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    School bullying and bare life: Challenging the state of exception2019In: Educational Philosophy and Theory, ISSN 0013-1857, E-ISSN 1469-5812, Vol. 51, no 14, p. 1444-1453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a vast amount of research into school bullying and the widespread implementation of anti-bullying policies and programs, large numbers of students continue to report that they are routinely subjected to bullying by their peers. In this theoretical article, I argue that part of the problem is that there has been a lack of critical discussion of the theoretical foundations upon which such studies are based. Drawing on recent theoretical contributions within the field of school bullying, the work of anthropologist James C. Scott, and the work of philosophers Michel Foucault and Giorgio Agamben, I take particular issue with the notion of power that has long been a foundational pillar of bullying definitions. Utilizing a Foucauldian understanding of power, I argue that rather than focusing on the power imbalance involved in bullying relations, focus instead needs to shift onto the role that bullying plays in power relations. Reimagining Agamben’s figure of homo sacer as a victim of school bullying, I consider the ways in which some individuals are reduced to bare life and forced into a state of exception whereby social laws are no longer deemed applicable. The article concludes with a discussion of how this state of exception might be challenged.

  • 3.
    Martín-Bylund, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The matter of silence in early childhood bilingual education2018In: Educational Philosophy and Theory, ISSN 0013-1857, E-ISSN 1469-5812, Vol. 50, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between silence as non-speech and bilingualism in early childhood education is intricate. This article maps this relationship with the help of diverse theoretical entrances to a video-recorded everyday episode from a bilingual (Spanish–Swedish) preschool in Sweden. Though this, three alternative readings of silence are produced. Thinking with Deleuzian philosophy, the aim is to consider how the different readings of silence require different understandings of both time and language and allow different bilingual child subjectivities. The different readings present silence as development, strategy and intensity. Thinking with different dimensions of language as well as Chronosand Aion as different notions of time, the article shows that silence as development and silence as strategy are individually, chronologically and linguistically oriented readings. These allow viewing the bilingual child as more or less competent, active and powerful in relation to adults. Furthermore, silence as intensity is collectively produced as well as temporally unbounded, and produces the bilingual child, as involved in several material–semiotic relations capable of amazement. It is discussed whether, due to the evasive and inconsistent nature of silence, all three readings are equally (im)possible. Nevertheless, they produce different effects and raise different questions concerning bilingual educational practice in the early years.

  • 4.
    Olson, Maria
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Sweden.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Sandberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The formation of the willing citizen: Tracing reactive nihilism in late capitalist adult education2018In: Educational Philosophy and Theory, ISSN 0013-1857, E-ISSN 1469-5812, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 95-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of education in citizen training has been well mapped out in youth education. What has been less studied is how this role comes into being in adult education. By providing illustrative empirical examples from a recently completed study of adult students enrolled in adult education, this article aims to offer a theoretical response to the question of the role of adult education in adult student citizen subjectivity formation. Taking on Diken’s concept of ‘reactive nihilism’, we wish to make the following arguments. First, that citizen formation in adult education, when students are asked about it, is actualised as processes of re(dis)covery of will in order to be(come) a successful and happy citizen in society. Secondly, that these processes point towards a role of adult education as one where these formation processes work in tandem with those of the reactive nihilists. This means that the citizen formation processes made possible in this educational site are those marked out by the desire to mobilise one’s will formation so that it adapts to the prevailing societal situation—that of late capitalism, which is a situation not considered by the adult students as possible to change.

  • 5.
    Popkewitz, Thomas S.
    et al.
    Dept. Of Curriculum and Instruction University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA.
    Olsson, Ulf
    Inst. för samhälle, kultur och lärande Lärarhögskolan i Stockholm.
    Petersson, Kenneth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    The Learning Society, the unfinished Cosmopolitan, and Governing Education, Public Health and Crime Prevention at the Beginning of the Twenty-First Century2006In: Educational Philosophy and Theory, ISSN 0013-1857, E-ISSN 1469-5812, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 431-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The -learning society- expresses principles of a universal humanity and a promise of progress that seems to transcend the nation. The paper indicates how this society is governed in the name of a cosmopolitan ideal that despite its universal pretensions embodies particular inclusions and exclusions. These occur through inscribing distinctions and differentiations that distinguish between the characteristics of those who embody a cosmopolitan reason that brings social progress and personal fulfillment and those who do not embody the cosmopolitan principles of civility and normalcy. Mapping the circulation of the notion of the -learning society- in actual arena-s of Swedish health and criminal justice, and Swedish and US school reforms lets appear the mode of life of the citizen of this society, the learner, as an -unfinished cosmopolitanism- and also directs attention to its -other(s)- - those that are outside.

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