liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Dolva, Anne-Stine
    et al.
    Lillehammer University College, Norway.
    Gustavsson, Anders
    Stockholm University.
    Borell, Lena
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Facilitating peer interaction - support to children with Down syndrome in mainstream schools2011In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 201-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses the support provided by class staff in order to facilitate social participation of pupils with Down syndrome and peers in regular classes, and how they experience the interaction between the pupils. Data were collected through field observations of six pupils with Down syndrome in their class in mainstream schools, their six teachers and teachers’ assistants. Qualitative interviews were conducted with the teachers and teachers’ assistants. The analysis showed different support strategies, implying both environmental adaptations and individual support in order to facilitate peer interaction. A major finding was the role of the ‘supported ego’, mainly provided by teachers’ assistants. This role accommodated to the differences between the pupils, by compensating for the cognitive difficulties (i.e., perceptions, understanding and agency) of the pupils with Down syndrome. We concluded that class staff strived to keep the class as one unit by creating opportunities for participation for all the pupils through different strategies depending on their role and responsibility.

  • 2.
    Dolva, Anne-Stine
    et al.
    Lillehammer University College.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Anders
    Stockholm University.
    Borell, Lena
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Children with Down syndrome in mainstream schools: peer interaction in activities2010In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 283-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this qualitative study was to explore peer interaction in the context of school activities in mainstream classes that included pupils with Down syndrome together with their peers without disabilities in order to identify enabling conditions. Six children with Down syndrome, each of whom was the only one with Down syndrome in a regular class, were observed and interviewed. Two main patterns of interaction were identified; equal and unequal interaction. Enabling conditions were found to be related to the pupils' shared understanding of the activities and the task demands in relation to the performance range of the participating pupils. When interaction was challenged by limited understanding of the activity or by too high task demands in relation to performance range, the findings revealed how peers applied diverse enabling strategies to include the pupil with Down syndrome. The results of this study highlight how activities form the basis for interaction and constitute an understudied and very important dimension for peer interaction. By looking more closely at this dimension, we can discover a fruitful approach with which to enable interaction between pupils with and without disability.

  • 3.
    Lidström, Helene
    et al.
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm and Folke Bernadotte Regional Habilitation Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala.
    Granlund, Mats
    CHILD Research Environment, Department of Behavioural Science and Social Work, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Use of ICT in school: a comparison between students with and without physical disabilities2011In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 21-34Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to determine the information and communication technologies use in school activities of two groups of students with physical disabilities, comprised of those who did and those who did not use a computer-based assistive technology device (ATD) and to make a comparison with students from the general population. In addition, positive factors associated with in-school computer use are identified for students with physical disabilities. The method adopted was a cross-sectional survey about computer-based activities in school among students with physical disabilities (n = 287); including those who used (n = 127) and those who did not use (n  = 160) a computer-based ATD in school (mean age 13 years 6 months). Group comparisons were made with students from the general population (n  = 940). The results showed that the most frequent computer users were students with physical disabilities, who used a computer-based ATD daily. However, when considered as a group, students with physical disabilities used the computer for less varied educational activities than the reference group. Four factors had a positive association to ‘participation in computer activities in school’ for students with physical disabilities: attending a mainstream school, the students’ age (notably, being 16–18 years old), using a computer often in school, and the teachers using a computer frequently in teaching. The present study concludes that, regardless of whether they use a computer-based ATD or not, students with a physical disability have restricted participation in some computer-based educational activities in comparison to students from the general population. An individual plan could be beneficial for each student to: focus on the aim of the computer use; examine the students’ needs in terms of computer-based ATDs and their inclusion in education; and ensure that the students’ digital skills are fully utilised.

  • 4.
    Linton, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Germundsson, Per
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Danemark, Berth
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Teachers’ social representation of students with Asperger diagnosis2013In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 392-412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While progress has been made for including students with disability into mainstream schools, trends point to problems for students with Asperger syndrome (AS) diagnosis who have a propensity to dropping out of school. Teachers’ perceptions and understanding of AS will affect expectations and the attainment of educational targets. Thus, to avoid barriers to students’ learning and participation, there is a need to shed light on teachers’ perceptions and beliefs that bear on teachers educational provision for students with AS. The aim of the study was therefore to elucidate mainstream teachers’ representations of students with AS by using the theoretical framework of Social Representation Theory and particularly looking at the effects of the sex of the teacher, grade level being taught and when the teachers received training themselves. Teachers in mainstream schools in Sweden were invited to complete a web-based ques- tionnaire (N=170). Data were collected through an association task where the participants were asked to produce up to five words or phrases for the stimulus phrase ‘student with Asperger diagnosis’. The data were analysed through cate- gorisation. We found that two-thirds of the macro-categories of mentions relate to ‘disabling aspects’, ‘individual needs’ and ‘individual characteristics’, while a third of the elements were tied to the environment and educational provision. Our results suggest that a medical approach dominates especially earlier trained teachers; however, there is a tendency to view the school environment as increas- ingly important. Representations about the disabling aspects decreased with the increase in the grades being taught, whereas the educational aspects increase with the increase in grades. Male teachers are more prone to relate to environmental aspects and educational provision while female teachers more often relate to needs and disability. We conclude that teachers tend to view AS from a medical approach but that the school environment is seen as increasingly important.

  • 5.
    Rytterström, Patrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Borgestig, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Teachers’ experiences of using eye gaze-controlled computers for pupils with severe motor impairments and without speech2016In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 506-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore teachers’ experiences of using eye gaze-controlled computers with pupils with severe disabilities. Technology to control a computer with eye gaze is a fast growing field and has promising implications for people with severe disabilities. This is a new assistive technology and a new learning situation for teachers. Using a reflective lifeworld approach, 11 teachers were interviewed twice. The essence of the phenomenon of teaching pupils who use an eye gaze-controlled computer is to understand what the pupil does with the computer and relate this to what the pupil wants to express through the computer. The pupils have emotions, wishes and knowledge that are trapped in their own bodies. The eye gaze computer creates opportunities to get a glimpse of these thoughts to others, and creates hope concerning the pupil’s future possibilities. The teacher’s responsibility to try to understand what is inside the pupil’s trapped body is a motivating factor to integrate the computer in everyday classroom activities. The results give directions for teaching and for implementation of eye gaze computers in the school system, and also suggest improvements that could be made to computers.

  • 6.
    Yngve, Moa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekbladh, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Which students need accommodations the most, and to what extent are their needs met by regular upper secondary school?: A cross-sectional study among students with special educational needs2019In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 327-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was twofold: (1) to identify factors associated with a high level of accommodation needs in school activities among students with special educational needs (SEN) in regular upper secondary education; and (2) to investigate the extent to which schools have met students’ perceived accommodation needs. Accommodation needs and their provision in school activities were assessed with the School Setting Interview for 484 students with SEN. Students’ mean age was 17.3 years and 50% did not have a diagnosis. A logistic regression analysis revealed that a high level of school absence, studying a vocational programme, and a neuropsychiatric disorder were associated with a high level of accommodation needs. In the majority of school activities, about 50% of students had not received any accommodation despite an experienced need for support. About 30% of students perceived a need for support even though they had been provided with accommodations, and around 25% stated they were satisfied with received accommodations. Regular upper secondary school students with SEN are insufficiently provided with accommodations to satisfactorily participate in education. Specific student characteristics, e.g. high level of school absence, should receive special attention when investigating and accommodating students’ needs for support in school activities.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf