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  • 1.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Larsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Walters, Shirley
    University of Western Cape.
    Making the invisible visible. On participation and communication in a global, web-based master's programme2006In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 69-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on the discourse of an intercontinental on-line Master's programme in adult learning, using English as the lingua franca of the programme and involving four collaborating universities in Sweden, South Africa, Canada and Australia. The programme is highly interactive, emphasising communication between students. Taking the variation in participation as the point of departure, a discourse analysis aiming at analysing the contingencies contributing to the pattern of communication in the programme was undertaken. Data consist of a variety of texts on-line web-documents, written notes, and narratives that participants wrote about their lives related to participation in the programme. The use of English as the lingua franca contributed to a mistake anxiety, which for some students was hampering their communication in the programme. Aspects of the material world such as the vast differences in the efforts and costs for participating in the programme were also highly interrelated to the shaping of socio-culturally situated identities among the students and thereby contributing to the variation in frequency in participation. The results show that the official discourse of the programme as a text, with its emphasis on equity, change and development, gets subordinated to the discourses produced and reproduced by the students in the programme as a discursive practice and social practice. The students' accounts reveal that there are fragments of an alternative discourse emerging, based on mutual concern and friendship, which might suggest a potential for changing the communicative patterns in the programme.

  • 2.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Reid, Anna
    Macquarie University, Sydney.
    Dahlgren, Lars-Ove
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Petocz, Peter
    Macquarie University, Sydney.
    Learning for the professions: Lessons from linking international research projects2008In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 129-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the core of higher education is the experience of students whose focus for learning is often directed towards their future employability. In this paper, we explore the intersections between two large international research projects involving over 500 students. Interviews with students yielded their conceptions of learning and work in specific discipline and professional areas. Analysis of the Swedish and Australian data sets showed the important interplay between students' individual ideas about learning and future work with their workplace. A meta-analysis of the two projects highlights the utility of higher education for students' future working life and suggests ways in which institutions and policy makers can critique current practice in a way that will incline curriculum and teaching development towards professional formation. © 2007 Springer Science + Business Media B.V.

  • 3.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Öberg, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Environmental Science.
    Questioning to learn and learning to question: Structure and function of problem-based learning scenarios in environmental science education2001In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 263-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In problem-based learning, scenarios relating to real life are used as a point of departure for the learning process. Even though the importance of suitable cases or scenarios in bringing about a fruitful learning process is emphasised in the literature, few studies focus on how they actually function in the learning process. This study focuses on how the scenarios used in a ten-week introductory course of a new four-year undergraduate programme in environmental science functioned in terms of the structure and content of the questions they evoked. Data were gathered through diary notes from nine groups of students, comprising 5-8 students per group. The data were subjected to a qualitative analysis aimed at describing the structure and content of the questions generated by the groups. Five different kinds of questions were identified and labelled, encyclopaedic, meaning-oriented, relational, value-oriented and solution-oriented. All scenarios generated questions pertaining to all five categories in all groups, but the emphasis varied. The results are discussed in relation to the design of scenarios, and in relation to students' approaches to learning.

  • 4. Abrandt, M.
    et al.
    Castensson, R.
    Dahlgren, Lars-Ove
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    PBL from the teacher's perspective. Conceptions of the tutor's role within problem based learning.1998In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 36, p. 437-447Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bienkowska, Dzamila
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Creating entrepreneurial networks: academic entrepreneurship, mobility and collaboration during PhD education2012In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 207-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Network-building activities of PhD students are an important area of study in furthering our understanding of academic entrepreneurship. This paper focuses on PhD students’ participation in network-building activities defined as mobility and collaboration, as well as own interest in and perceived grade of support for commercialisation from various levels of the university hierarchy. The results of a large-scale survey (of 1,126 PhD students at Linköping University, Sweden, 41% response rate) presented here show that the majority of PhD students are engaged in collaborations with external organisations, though quite few (one quarter) have spent a part of their PhD education outside their home university. PhD students from all faculties are on average interested in commercialisation and in favour of it. However, PhD students from the faculty of Health Sciences state that it is difficult for them to combine research and commercialisation. Furthermore, interest in commercialisation of research results is relatively lowest amongst those PhD students who are undertaking mobility placements at other universities, thus pointing to an experienced incompatibility of research and academic entrepreneurship.

  • 6.
    Brouwer, Jasperina
    et al.
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Flache, Andreas
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Jansen, Ellen
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Hofman, Adriaan
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Steglich, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Emergent achievement segregation in freshmenlearning community networks2018In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 76, no 3, p. 483-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common assumption about Freshmen Learning Communities (FLCs) is that academic relationships contribute to students’ success. This study investigates how students inlearning communities connect with fellow students for friendship and academic support. Longitudinal social network data across the first year, collected from 95 Dutch students in eight FLCs, measure both social and academic relational choices within and beyond the FLCs. Using stochastic actor-based models, the study tests two competing hypotheses. The alignment hypothesis states that students connect with their similar-achieving friends for both academic and social support, leading to an alignment of both types of networks over time. In contrast, the duality hypothesis states dissimilarity between academic support networks and friendship networks: students should connect with better-achieving fellow students for academic support and to more similar peers for friendship. The data support the alignment hypothesis but not the duality hypothesis; in addition, they show evidence of achievement segregation in FLCs: the higher the students’ achievement level, the more they connect with other students for both academic support and friendship, relating in particular to peers with a similarly high achievement level. The results suggest that lower-achieving students are excluded from the support provided by higher achieving students and instead ask similar lower achievers for support. They thus cannot benefit optimally from the academic integration FLC offer. The article concludes with recommendations of how to support students in an FLC so that they can reach optimal achievement potential.

  • 7.
    Ellström, Per-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Four Faces of Educational Organizations1983In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 231-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article attempts to explore the presumed distinctive character of educational organizations. This is done by explicating and proposing an integration of four organizational models. The models are called: the rational-, the political-, the social system-, and the anarchistic model, respectively. A basic assumption is that the models represent four complementary dimensions of organizations, rather than four mutually exclusive alternatives. A typology is outlined, indicating a set of conditions under which the four dimensions are assumed to be differently salient. In conclusion, it is argued that educational organizations may be conceived of as involving an interplay of four dimensions characterized by the keywords: truth (the rational dimension), trust (the social dimension), power (the political dimension), and foolishness (the anarchistic dimension).

  • 8.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    A scheme for understanding group processes in problem-based learning2008In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 505-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to identify, describe and interpret group processes occurring in tutorials in problem-based learning. Another aim was to investigate if a combination of Steiner's (Steiner, I. D. (1972). Group process and productivity. New York: Academic Press.) theory of group work and Bion's (Bion, W. R. (1961). Experiences in groups. New York: Tavistock Publications Limited.) theory of work and regression in groups may be a fruitful way to interpret and explain group dynamics in problem-based learning. Data have been collected through a multi-strategy approach. The principal method for data gathering was qualitative. The quantitative method was used as a follow-up study. The data gathering methods used were observation, questionnaire and interviews. The results disclose that it is possible to give a comprehensive and descriptive picture of the group processes that occur in tutorials. The results also show that a combination of Steiner's and Bion's theories may be a fruitful way to describe, interpret and explain group dynamics in tutorial groups. By combining the theories a scheme for understanding group processes was created. The combination, in form of a new model, can be considered as a way of developing the theories and at the same time, it offers a theoretical tool for research purposes. The combination represents a new way of categorising group processes and can hopefully provide a better understanding of interactional dynamics in groups and account for greater explanation value with respect to group processes. © 2007 Springer Science + Business Media B.V.

  • 9.
    Johansson, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hård af Segerstad, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlgren, Lars-Ove
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The two Faces of Political Science Studies: Junior and Senior students' thoughts about their education and their future profession2008In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 55, no 6, p. 623-636Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article reports on an empirical small scaled interview study among junior and senior students in the political science programme in a Swedish University. The aim is to describe how students at various stages of their studies conceive of their education as well as their future professional life. Questions about their identity as students have also been posed. The results indicate that a programme with a major emphasis on political science appears to have two different faces as experienced by the students. The first half of the programme is experienced as traditional liberal arts studies, i.e., the students enrol in a ‘personal bildung project’ and conceive of political scientists as a kind of watchdog for democracy. Students in the latter part of their studies report an emerging identity as investigators and civil servants and an appreciation of the parts of the studies that enhance their generic skills.

  • 10.
    Salminen-Karlsson, Minna
    et al.
    Sociologiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Wallgren, Lillemor
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Interaction of Academic and Industrial Supervisors in Graduate Education: An Investigation of Industrial Research Schools2008In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 77-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we explore the work and the cooperation of academic and industrial supervisors concerning single graduate students in so called industrial research schools, which are financially supported by a national research foundation and involve universities and industrial enterprises. Academic and industrial supervisors of totally eleven graduate students have been interviewed with focus on their cooperation. This cooperation entails negotiating the contract and monitoring the progress of the research project and the student. When students have problems this cooperation is particularly important. The places new demands on both the academic and industrial supervisors. In our study these demands were dealt with differently by different academic supervisors, depending whether their main orientation was towards industrial projects or traditional academic research. The way the industrial supervisors dealt with the new demands depended on their previous acquaintance with academic research, basically whether they had a doctoral degree or not. Another important finding was that academic knowledge had a strong position while the supervisors from the industry accepted a minor role. The main findings of the study are that industrial graduate students often require joint engagement in a way that differs from other forms of knowledge transfer between the academy and the industry. To explain the features of this type of knowledge transfer, we use the analytical concepts boundary subject and phronesis.

  • 11.
    Silén, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology .
    The tutor's approach in base groups (PBL)2006In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 373-385Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the concept of approach related to tutor functioning in problem-based learning (PBL) is explored and the significance of a phenomenological perspective of the body in relation to learning and tutoring is investigated. The aim has been to understand the concept of approach in a context where the individual, thoughts, emotions and body are regarded as a whole in a learning process - a non-dualistic entity. The analysis is primarily based on Merleau-Ponty (Phenomenologie de la Perception. Editions Gallimard, Kroppens fenomenologi. Oslo: Pax) and Leder (1990). The outcome of the analysis is related to the pedagogical view that characterises PBL and tutoring in base groups. An earlier study (Silén Licentiate thesis n 3/1996. Linköping University) about tutor functioning in PBL was the starting-point for the exploration. On the basis of the phenomenological analysis, I assign approach the following meaning: - the total message expressed by 'the lived body' in interaction with its life world. The analysis indicates that the tutor's approach influences group work in different ways. One of phenomenology's most important messages implies that the tutor's approach should be characterised by 'presence', attention on the students and what is happening in the group, and not on the tutor's own actions and thoughts. The ability to be 'present' is possible when the knowing is rooted in the lived body. This conclusion brings to the fore the necessity of the tutor's own understanding of the ideas of PBL and the underlying theories, and also highlights the importance of regarding tutor training as an ongoing learning process. The focus of the exploration has been on the tutor in PBL. In principle, I would argue that a corresponding line of reasoning is applicable to tutoring and learning in general. © Springer 2006.

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