liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Hallström, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Avdelningen för didaktik och forskning om pedagogiskt arbete (DIPA). Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Technical Knowledge in a Technical Society: Elementary School Technology Education in Sweden, 1919-19282009In: History of Education, ISSN 0046-760X, E-ISSN 1464-5130, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 455-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to identify a technical domain of knowledge in the curriculum of the Swedish elementary school and views on elementary school technology of two interest groups – school teachers and engineers. Gradually during the early to mid-1920s there was increased technical content in the Swedish elementary school, if we look at the new curriculum, in-service education and stakeholders’ views. The main reasons for this were, first of all, that the first decades of the twentieth century witnessed industrial growth with accompanying technification of large parts of society including the school. Second, the curriculum of 1919 had a broader technical content than earlier curricula, and thus mirrored the societal changes. Third, vocational secondary schools led to new requirements in respect of elementary technology education. Representatives of the Government were prime movers in enhancing the significance of technology in school together with teachers, while engineers generally showed little interest.

  • 2.
    Hallström, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Avdelningen för didaktik och forskning om pedagogiskt arbete (DIPA). Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    'To hold the subject's territory': The Swedish Association of Biology Teachers and two curricular reforms, 1960-19652010In: History of Education, ISSN 0046-760X, E-ISSN 1464-5130, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 239-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to investigate and analyse the cultural boundaries of school biology, and to a certain extent the natural science subjects in general, in two Swedish curriculum reforms, from the viewpoint of the Swedish Association of Biology Teachers (ABT). Thomas Gieryn’s concept of boundary‐work is thus used in analysing how the ABT acted to ‘hold the subject’s territory’. The ABT had substantial influence on the content of the new biology curricula, although this was sometimes achieved after internal conflict and required support from other actors, especially university biologists. Upper secondary biology had the highest status and was seen as a science, related to modern biological research and curriculum development, particularly in the USA. Despite the efforts of the ABT boundary‐work was unsuccessful in respect of the timetable; the natural science subjects were reduced both at the lower and upper secondary level, in contrast to what happened in many other Western countries.

  • 3.
    Hultén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Scientists, teachers and the 'scientific' textbook: Interprofessional relations and the modernisation of elementary science textbooks in 19th century Sweden2016In: History of Education, ISSN 0046-760X, E-ISSN 1464-5130, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 143-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In research on the development of a nineteenth-century ‘science for the people’, initiatives by scientists or people well-trained in science has been emphasised, while the writings, roles and initiatives of elementary teachers are normally just mentioned in passing. In this study the development of nineteenth-century elementary science textbooks is analysed. While practitioners and popularisers of science established the genre as such, writing the first textbooks on elementary science and arguing for its place in elementary education, elementary teachers were prime movers in developing the genre both pedagogically and scientifically. In doing this they not only contributed to further strengthening the cultural status of science in late nineteenth-century Sweden but most probably strengthened the elementary teaching profession as a whole, formulating the expertise of the teacher in relation to elementary science.

  • 4.
    Hultén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Technology for all: turning a keyword into a school subject in post-war Sweden2013In: History of Education, ISSN 0046-760X, E-ISSN 1464-5130, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 622-637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The decades following the Second World War saw strong technological development and economic growth. They also saw the advent of technology education, a period of extensive curriculum development in this field. But what was done and why? In order to obtain a better understanding of the historical roots of technology education, in this study the mid-century school reforms in Sweden are examined and, more specifically, the birth of the new subject of Technology (Teknik) in compulsory schools. In this article, the political forces driving the introduction and shaping of this new subject are emphasised. In a time of rapid transformations of educational systems and labour markets, the term Teknik proved to be a useful concept for policy-makers and reform technocrats. However, the subject came to re-create the inequalities of the earlier differentiated school system, despite its presence within the framework of a school for all.

  • 5.
    Sköld, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The truth about abuse?: A comparative approach to inquiry narratives on historical institutional child abuse2016In: History of Education, ISSN 0046-760X, E-ISSN 1464-5130, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 492-509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades, history of childhood and history of education have gained status as political concerns through the establishment of numerous truth commissions and inquiries into historical institutional child abuse. The article discusses the methodological and ethical dilemmas that arise when writing the history of abused children with the objective of both recognising and redressing the victims as well as offering an account of ‘what really happened’. Comparing how inquiry commissions in Ireland, Sweden and Denmark evaluate and approach victims' oral testimonies and written records from child welfare agencies, the article explores the acts of balancing between different epistemological approaches to the concept of “truth”. The results suggest that while inquiries have to address and convince several audiences simultaneously, empiricist positivist methods of inquiry have dominated the approaches to “truth”. However, this approach has not been without ambivalence, and there are examples of constructivist approaches as well.

  • 6.
    Sköld, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Vehkalahti, Kaisa
    Finnish Youth Reserach Society, Finland.
    Marginalized children: methodological and ethical issues in the history of education and childhood2016In: History of Education, ISSN 0046-760X, E-ISSN 1464-5130, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 403-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue sets out to explore how marginalized children, as subjects within the field of history of education and childhood, challenge methodological and ethical considerations within historical research. In the articles of this special issue, we seek to find different methodological tools for studying these children and the different institutional practices that have marginalized them. The editorial begins with a brief overview of how history of childhood and history of education in particular, have treated children as subjects for research. Next, the editorial seeks to identify methodological and ethical dilemmas that need to be taken into account when studying histories of children who have been living in the margins of past societies, or those who have left only fragmentary traces in the existing historical records and archives. This leads to epistemological issues concerning children’s voice and agency, as well as the question of truth in the history of education.

  • 7.
    Zetterqvist Nelson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Sandin, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    The politics of reading and writing problems: Changing definitions in Swedish schooling during the twentieth century2005In: History of Education, ISSN 0046-760X, E-ISSN 1464-5130, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 189-205Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reading and writing problems in school children has been the focus of a growing scientific interest regarding during the twentieth century. In search for definition, cause(s) and pedagogical interventions the subject is explored in medical, psychological and educational research. It is a field of knowledge characterized by scientific controversies and competing explanatory frames. In this article we approach the issue from a historic perspective. During the 20th century the development of compulsory schooling in Sweden three main periods can be discerned. Each is characterised by one specific explanatory framework dominating the educational policy discourse. These changing periods are related to both the increase of school participation during the first decades of the 20th century and the political ambitions associated with an education for all social classes. The politics of reading and writing problems mirrors a conflict not only about scholarly perspectives on reading and writing problems but also about the organization of welfare and system of education

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf