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  • 1.
    Bank, Natasha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kanda, Wisdom
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tenant recruitment and support processes in sustainability-profiled business incubators2016In: Industry & higher education, ISSN 0950-4222, E-ISSN 2043-6858, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 267-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recruitment and support processes in sustainability-profiled incubators have received little research attention. The article addresses this knowledge gap in an empirical investigation of three sustainability-oriented incubators in Sweden, Finland and Germany. The data are based on interviews with managers, stakeholders and tenants in Green Tech Park (Sweden), LADEC (Finland) and Green Garage (Germany). On average, the studied incubators had an ambition to recruit and develop sustainability-oriented start-ups, but the number of tenants must reach a critical mass if such ambitions are to become a reality. The local context influences this critical mass of start-ups and is a determining factor in generating (a) potential tenants and (b) the resources to support such firms. This suggests that incubator managers must actively seek tenants interested in sustainable entrepreneurship and that support must focus on activities in sustainability.

  • 2.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Training for entrepreneurship and new businesses1999In: Industry & higher education, ISSN 0950-4222, E-ISSN 2043-6858, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 397-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important part of governmental industrial policy is to support entrepreneurship and the creation of new businesses through various programmes. These are often organized at regional or local level by support organizations such as innovation centres (at universities), regional development funds and science parks. Earlier studies of business support structures have focused mainly on the `demand' side; that is, on participants' perceptions of the usefulness of taking part in different support programmes. These studies have shown that there is a mismatch between the supply and demand side in business support activities. This paper deals with the supply side's view of organizing support activities for entrepreneurs and new businesses. The author analyses the responses to a questionnaire survey of business support organizations in Sweden. The results show that the support organizations are well aware of the problems the participants have - relating to, among other things, time, educational methods, finance, priorities, and access to information. At the same time, the support organizations disagree with suggestions that they are too theoretical in their teaching, lack experience in the problems of small businesses, offer inflexible programmes, have problems communicating, or lack teaching expertise (in, for example, training programmes). This paper discusses the gap in perception between the suppliers and their market and addresses the policy issues it raises. The implications for training for entrepreneurship and new businesses are also addressed.

  • 3.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bienkowska, Dzamila
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Laur, Inessa
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sölvell, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Success factors in cluster initiative management: Mapping out the ‘big five’2015In: Industry & higher education, ISSN 0950-4222, E-ISSN 2043-6858, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 65-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cluster development is prioritized in policy programmes as a means to facilitate regional growth and job creation. Triple Helix actors are often involved in so-called cluster initiatives – intermediary organizations having the objective of the development of a local or regional cluster. This paper maps out the ‘big five’ qualitative success factors in cluster initiative management: the idea; driving forces and commitment; activities; critical mass; and organization. The proposed framework enables the assessment of performance and sustainability over time, useful for both everyday management operations and policy programmes designed to support cluster initiatives.

  • 4.
    Wallgren, Lillemor
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlgren, Lars Owe
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Industrial doctoral students as brokers between industry and academia: Factors affecting their trajectories, learning at the boundaries and identity development2007In: Industry & higher education, ISSN 0950-4222, E-ISSN 2043-6858, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 195-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors look at the learning context for 23 industrial doctoral students and assess the prerequisites for the development of their identity as researchers. The students are located in three different industrial research schools - Management, Medical Bioinformatics and Building and Indoor Climate. The purpose of the study is to describe the students' total learning environment and to ascertain what factors influence, hinder or encourage their development within the doctoral education process. To achieve this, the authors use Lave and Wenger's situated learning theory, conceptual framework and, in particular, trajectory concept (Wenger 1998, 2000). By following the students' histories, participation and ways of belonging to different communities of practice, and their aspirations, huge variations in their learning trajectories can be documented. Six typical cases are elaborated in detail, with a specific focus on the students' participation in and belonging to the environments involved. The procedures for thesis project selection and supervision are two of the five factors scrutinized. However, the trajectory concept, while helpful in the investigation, had to be complemented. Other elements that needed scrutiny were the effects of differences in knowledge formation, unequal power relations and fluctuations in market requirements. Internal business reorganizations that change the company's focus, interests and personnel policies, and which in turn influence the students' progress and prospects, were also considered.

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