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  • 1.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Education and other modes of thinking in Latin America2015In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 34, no 01, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    If the production of knowledge in Latin America has long been subject to imperial designs and disseminated through educational systems, recent interventions —from liberation theology, popular education, participatory action research, alternative communication and critical literacy to postcolonial critique and decolonial options—have sought to shift the geography of reason. The central question to be addressed is how, in times of historical ruptures, political reconstructions and epistemic formations, the production of paradigms rooted in ‘other’ logics, cosmologies and realities may renegotiate and redefine concepts of education, learning and knowledge.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Mobility of knowledge as a recognition challenge: experiences from Sweden2010In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 201-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on the tensions between mobility, knowledge and recognition, and what the impact of migration could be on lifelong education and society. This is discussed with the case of Sweden as the starting point. The main issue in Sweden concerning migration is the admission of refugees. Sweden has had a relatively open policy concerning refugees in recent decades, and a large number of refugees have also been granted residence permits. Thus, they have not come to Sweden due to a labour shortage, and the demand for their knowledge in the labour market has not been high. Their knowledge is not recognised in terms of employment in vocations where their prior learning could be utilised. This means that Sweden has faced challenges concerning questions of recognition and lifelong education. In this article, we take as our starting point the policy in this area, including policy texts and national initiatives as well as experiences from such initiatives, to discuss the role of lifelong education and recognition of prior learning in a situation where mobility concerns not only migration of people but also of knowledge. We discuss how this knowledge, which has been situated in another national context, can be recognised and included in further lifelong education, and what type of lifelong education or lifelong learning is needed in this situation.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Sandberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Introducing research on recognition of prior learning2013In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 405-411Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Gao, Shibao
    University of Calgary.
    Governing through non/recognition: the missing 'R' in the PLAR for immigrant professionals in Canada and Sweden2009In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 423-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite claims that prior learning assessment and recognition (PLAR) can act as a transformative social mechanism and a means of social inclusion, this study reports that PLAR has become a serious barrier to adult learning rather than a facilitator. Drawing from Foucault's concept of governmentality, the study examines the difficulties that immigrant professionals have experienced in having their foreign credentials and work experience recognized in the contexts of Canada and Sweden. Using document analysis and interviews, the study analyses how PLAR has created a system of governing through technologies of power and technologies of the self which work as dividing practices in discounting and devaluating immigrants' prior learning and work experience. The study concludes that PLAR has become a technical exercise and a governing tool rather than a form of social transformation.

  • 5.
    Boud, David
    et al.
    Faculty of Education University of Technology, Sydney.
    Dahlgren, Lars-Ove
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Larsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Sork, Tom
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
    Walters, Shirley
    University of Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Creating a world class program: Reciprocity and constraints in global study.2006In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 609-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article reflects on the construction of a common Master's programme across four universities located on four continents, in order to explore the role of networks in international educational collaboration. The study draws on the documented processes of the principal members of the programme team. It is presented as a case study of the development of the programme that uses ideas drawn from actor-network theory to draw attention to the conjunction of human and non-human actors that shaped the resulting web-based courses. Constraints arising from major institutional and systemic obstacles were addressed through the effects of the actor-network. The reciprocity of action and de-centring of individual activity made possible through the collaboration enabled the human actors to sustain a level of innovation within their own institutions that would not have been possible through them acting alone.

  • 6.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Futures in line?: Occupational choice among migrant adult students in Sweden2019In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 76-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to analyse the ways in which migration plays outin adult students’ narratives about their occupational choice and future,focusing on three individual narratives of adult students with variousexperiences of migration to Sweden. Drawing on Sara Ahmed’s conceptionof orientation, our results show how the adult students’ narrativeson their future occupations are formed on the basis of migration, pertainingto their particular experiences of being recognised as migrantOthers. Among the three students, similar challenges emerge in terms oftheir claims for belonging. One the one hand, the students do claimbelonging to the Swedish social community. On the other hand, theyare – as ‘migrants’ – repeatedly reminded of their non-belonging to thiscommunity. In various ways, they feel out of place. Although migration,in the narratives, is not played out one and the same way, but in variousways, engagement in adult education as a means of finding a job appearas the main orientation guiding the futures of the adult students, asbeing an important way of finding a future and claim one’s belonging tothe Swedish social community.

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Forsberg, Anette
    Dalarnas forskningsråd.
    The part played by popular education in local development processes in suburban and rural areas of Sweden2010In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 323-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

     A brief narrative description of the journal article, document, or resource.On the basis of a three-year study of the role of popular education in local development processes in Sweden (2006-2008), this paper sets out to outline the role of popular education as a development actor in rural and urban contexts. Two different scenarios and approaches are discussed. One is the role of popular education in rural areas, which is interlinked with the village movement, dominated by bottom-up approaches and strongly linked to voluntary work carried out by local inhabitants themselves. Another scenario is the role of popular education in urban areas, which is dominated by top-down approaches in which popular education has taken on the role of implementing and running projects funded by the government and public sector, "for" local inhabitants. Our findings on the role of popular education in local development processes in urban and rural areas are discussed in relation to theories on community development and community identity, and to a theoretical model that illustrates the different ways in which popular education relates to local communities.

  • 8.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Book review of: Flexibility and lifelong learning2007In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 356-357Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 9.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Book review of: Reforming higher education in the Nordic countries2005In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 448-449Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Book review of: Transforming a learning society2006In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 186-187Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    New wine in old skins: Changing patterns in the governing of the adult learner in Sweden2005In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 71-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates students' initial encounters with the seminar as a working form in higher education. The main interest was to explore how the communication pattern, the aim of the seminar and meaning were negotiated. The results originate from an ethnographic field study where we followed a group of students in a Masters program in Social Science during their first five weeks. Data were analyzed from a socio-cultural perspective and the concepts of participation and reification. We found that there was an implicit negotiation of the communication pattern, what to discuss and the function of the seminar. In these processes, the students and teacher participated in the negotiation of meaning. Different objects were created through a reification process, around which the negotiation of meaning took place.

  • 12.
    Fejes, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Runesdotter, Caroline
    Göteborgs universitet, Sweden.
    Wärvik, Gun-Britt
    Göteborgs universitet, Sweden.
    Marketisation of adult education: Principals as business leaders, standardised teachers and responsibilised students2016In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 664-681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The marketisation of education is a global phenomenon and has attracted increased interest during the last three decades, not least in terms of research on school choice and its consequences. However, while much research has been conducted on the marketisation of schooling, less attention has been directed at adult education. In this paper, focus is directed at institutional logics and institutional responses to the process of marketisation of adult education. More specifically, we focus on how a procurement system, implemented in order to create competition and to increase quality in adult education, influences how students construe themselves, as well as the way principals and teachers work. Our results indicate that teachers emerge as the main source of resistance towards an institutional logic emerging in the wake of marketisation, while principals and students to a large extent conform to the emerging institutional demands.

  • 13.
    Larsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Seven aspects of democracy as related to study circles2001In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 199-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Artikeln behandlar demokratibegreppet genom att se det som 7 aspekter, som tillsammans bildar en kedja. Detta aspektseende kan sedan användas i betraktelsen av empiriska fenomen för att uttyda i vilken mån de på något sätt bidrar till demokratin.

  • 14.
    Mbabazi, Penelope
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlgren, Lars Owe
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Students as learners through the eyes of their teachers in Rwandan higher education2012In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 503-521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we aim to explore and thematically analyze higher education teachers’ notions about the most important problems related to students’ learning, including the teachers’ notions of the approaches to learning that the students adopt. The study was carried out in Rwanda with 25 university teachers engaged in group interviews. Inspired by the concepts of metaphors for learning and approaches to learning, five main categories of students’ learning problems were identified: dependence, physical and economic resources, experience of a deep approach to learning, reading culture, and previous preparation for higher education. These problems are interrelated and point to the need to understand study levels in education systems as being interdependent. 

  • 15.
    Ruschkowski, Andreas
    et al.
    Hagabergs folkhögskola, Sweden.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Shaping the democratic, relational, and reflective youth recreation leader2019In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 632-643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Youth recreation centres have been a key institution in providing young people with meaningful activity after school, going back to the mid- twentieth century in Sweden. These centres have been the focus of research, but very few studies have paid attention to the youth recreation leader, the person working in these centres. In this article, we direct our focus towards youth recreation leaders by analysing how a discourse on the ideal youth recreation leader takes shape through policy, how it operates, and with what effect. We are inspired by the work of Foucault in understanding discourse, power, and subjectivity. Our analysis illus- trates how a democratic, relational, and reflective ideal youth recreation leader is shaped and fostered through current policy discourses in Sweden. Such a subjectivity emerges through technologies of power and the self, of which the confession is one. Through the confession, the youth recreation leader is simultaneously governed and governs others – the conduct of conduct. The case presented here can tell us more about the way in which governing operates in contemporary society.

  • 16.
    Åkerblom, Erika
    Department of Educational Sciences, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Gävle, Sweden.
    Discourses of lifelong learning: health as a governing technique in the shaping of the Swedish population2019In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focus on how the Swedish population is shaped into desirable citizens as resources for the nation?s prosperity. The aim is to analyse how health operates as a governing technique in discourses of lifelong learning. Within such current discourses the population is today described as generally well-educated and healthy, but not educated or healthy enough. When constructed as being in need of enhancement, measures of learning are suggested for regulating certain groups of the population into becoming what is regarded as desirable. Making use of Foucault?s notions of governmentality and genealogy, white and green papers from the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs from 1930s and today (2017) are analysed. The analysis shows that although the population is described as having different problems originating from ignorance, the solutions that are suggested in the different time periods are basically the same. The relation between learning and health is described in different ways in the 1930s and the present. In the 1930s learning is explained merely as a means to achieve a healthy population while in the present health is described both as a prerequisite and as an effect of learning. Further, there is also a difference in how the governing is conducted.

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