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  • 1.
    Bodén, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Seeing red?: The agency of computer software in the production and management of students’ school absences2013In: QSE. International journal of qualitative studies in education, ISSN 0951-8398, E-ISSN 1366-5898, Vol. 26, no 9, p. 1117-1131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing number of Swedish municipalities use digital software to manage the registration of students’ school absences. The software is regarded as a problem-solving tool to make registration more efficient, but its effects on the educational setting have been largely neglected. Focusing on an event with two students from a class of 11-year-olds, the aim of the paper is to explore schools’ common uses of computer software for registering absence in order to understand how materialities – like the software – are entangled with the production of school absence. In the paper, the Deleuzio–Guattarian concept of the assemblage is put to work within a feminist relational materialist framework. This enables an understanding of the complexity of school absence, where materialities of the educational setting are theorized as entangled with social and gendered discursive components.

  • 2.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Review of S. Hester & D. Francis (eds.): Local educational order2002In: QSE. International journal of qualitative studies in education, ISSN 0951-8398, E-ISSN 1366-5898, Vol. 15, p. 127-128Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Larsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Initial encounters in formal adult education1993In: QSE. International journal of qualitative studies in education, ISSN 0951-8398, E-ISSN 1366-5898, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 49-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    En studie av hur klassrumsordningen formas av maktspel mellan lärare och elever i vuxenutbildning

  • 4.
    Tholander, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    "How long was your poem?": Social comparison among junior high school students2011In: QSE. International journal of qualitative studies in education, ISSN 0951-8398, E-ISSN 1366-5898, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 31-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article focuses on in situ social comparison among junior high school students. Rather than studying social comparison as an individual phenomenon in experimental situations, which has been common in previous research, the study analyzes social comparison as a real-life social practice. The results show that the practice of social comparison among students reconnects to central elements of the formal assessment system. For instance, in staging comparison sequences, the students often circulated prior teacher assessments or engaged in various counting practices. Moreover, the results show that students partake in social comparison in order to establish, protect, or recapture an image as successful students. In so doing, they are socialized into a range of useful social-comparison practices. Despite this, some students necessarily turn out to be positioned lower than others. Thus, social comparison among students can be seen as an informal stratification process in the school system.

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