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  • 1.
    Agevall, Lena
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Kristianstad Univ, Sweden.
    Broberg, Pernilla
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Kristianstad Univ, Sweden.
    Umans, Timurs
    Kristianstad Univ, Sweden; Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    The New Generation of Auditors Meeting Praxis: Dual Learnings Role in Audit Students Professional Development2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 307-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores whether and in what way dual learning can develop understanding of the relationship between structure/judgement and explores audit students perceptions of the audit profession. The Work Integrated Learning (WIL) module, serving as a tool of enabling dual learning, represents the context for this exploration. The study is based on a focus group and individual interviews conducted with students performing their WIL. Our data and its analysis indicates that when in a WIL context, students develop awareness of the use of standards and checklists on the one hand, and the importance of discretional judgement on the other. Based on these results, we theorise as to how dual learning manifests itself in students experiences and understanding of the relationship between structure and judgement.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Avdelningen för didaktik och forskning om pedagogiskt arbete (DIPA). Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Andersson, Sven B
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Conditions for Boundary Crossing: Social Practices of Newly Qualified Swedish Teachers2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 643-660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to gain knowledge about conditions for boundary crossing between academic and vocational practices and to identify dimensions of social practice within workplaces. The data consist of 28 questionnaires and 14 in-depth interviews with newly qualified secondary school teachers in their first year of teaching. We use the lens of sociocultural theory to analyse qualitatively what we can learn from newcomers talk about their experiences and whether theories provided during their teacher education helped them to meet challenges in their new workplaces. Theoretically, notions of participation in social practices in terms of social space are in focus. In the findings, such space is identified as social adjustment, social distance, social inclusion and social expansion. Drawing on these concepts, we suggest that professional development depends strongly on the way new teachers boundary crossing is supported by collaboration and to what extent they belong to professional dialogues in settings with inclusive and expansive relationships.

  • 3.
    Andersson,, Sven B.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
      Authentic learnig in a socio-cultural framework2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 419--436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports a case study in which 53 adult refugees initiated their own forms of learning with the aim of strengthening their opportunities for integration into Swedish society. The overall research interest was to find out what theoretical implications can be drawn from a case study where two different forms of learning were implemented. One alternative was offered in a formal setting and another in a non-formal setting where the group members shaped forms of learning themselves. The findings show that many features of non-formal working procedures correspond with basic assumptions and key concepts of sociocultural theory. Furthermore, these features accord well with key concepts of authentic learning. In a similar way as theoretical aspects of “situated learning” can be seen as an integrated part of sociocultural theory, we discuss whether the notion “authentic learning” could be used as a dimension of supporting meaningful learning in contextualised inclusive learning environments.

  • 4.
    Einarsson, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Granström, Kjell
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Gender-biased interaction in the classroom: the influence of gender and age in the relationship between teacher and pupil2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 117-127Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Ekström, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Lindwall, Oskar
    University of Gothenburg.
    Säljö, Roger
    University of Gothenburg and University of Turku.
    Questions, instructions and modes of listening in the joint production of guided action: A study of student-teacher collaboration in handicraft education2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 53, no 5, p. 497-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article concerns a central issue in education as an institutional activity: instructions and their role in guiding student activities and understanding. In the study, we investigate the tensions between specifics and generalities in the joint production of guided action. This issue is explored in the context of handicraft education—or more specifically, a teacher education program in sloyd. Handicraft is particularly interesting when analysing instructions, since the purposes of instructions are often dual: (1) to bring about a broad, instructionally relevant mode of understanding artefacts (including their origin, aesthetics, etc.), and (2) to guide manual action in the production of such artefacts. In the article, a detailed analysis of an instructional sequence, which includes the production of two distinct types of embroideries, is reported. The analysis sheds light on the role of educational examples in sloyd as well as on the related issue concerning the distinctive difference between the activities of listening to instructions as part of a lecture, on the one hand, and, on the other, listening to instructions in order to be able to accomplish a task.

  • 6.
    Eriksson Barajas, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The Pimp and the Happy Whore: “Doing Gender” in Film Talk in a School Setting2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 581-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper concerns the use of film for eliciting discussions of fundamental values in an upper secondary school setting. In this case, Lilya 4-ever, a feature film about sex trafficking, is used. The present paper contributes some empirical knowledge about how young people are “doing gender” in a natural setting—an educational context—that celebrates equality values. The examples from a group discussion between pupils reveal a balance between performing the school task, discussing the questions on the sheet the teacher provided, and working on their private identities, which here includes social interplay that among teenagers could involve rejecting an academic identity. The analysis concerns how pupils use discourses drawn from a film in that balancing act. The paper explores how discourses on sex are used to gain power in conversation, to challenge male sexuality, and to reject victimization.

  • 7.
    Fejes, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Olson, Maria
    Högskolan Dalarna, Sweden.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sandberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Individualisation in Swedish adult education and the shaping of neo-liberal subjectivities2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 461-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we have analysed the ways a discourse on individualisation is taking shape within adult education in Sweden, how it operates, and what effects it has in terms of shaping student subjectivity. Drawing on a poststructural theorisation we analyse interviews with teachers and students in municipal adult education and folk high schools (FHS). The analysis illustrates how both institutions contribute to the shaping of individualised subjectivities, although differently. At the end, a general question is raised about what happens with the democratic function of adult education in general when a discourse on individualisation operates in the ways described and, more specifically, asks what is happening to FHS as an educational practice that upholds its self-image as a last bastion of a collective notion of learning and subjectivity and nurturing an educational practice of learning democracy?

  • 8.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Group work management in the classroom2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 222-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to provide a better understanding of teachers’ managing roles when using group work in the classroom. Building on Granström’s (2007) two concepts of leadership and teachership, a more specific aim is to investigate teachers’ managing roles when using group work and how teachers’ presumptions affect the way in which they manage the pedagogical mode. The results show that teachers’ managing roles influence teachers’ willingness to use group work. Teachers may be unwilling to use group work based on their presumption that it teaches students only collaboration abilities and not subject knowledge. This may be a supplemental yet significant explanation as to why group work continues to decrease in classrooms.

     

  • 9.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    "What's in it for me?" A study on students' accommodation and resistance during group work.2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 60, no 5, p. 500-514Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Elinor
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Wallman, Julia
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    How Simple is the Simple View of Reading?2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 292-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the Simple View of Reading, reading ability can be divided into decoding and language comprehension. In the present study, decoding and comprehension's contribution to reading ability was studied both in children with reading difficulties and in children with typical reading ability. Decoding and comprehension was further divided into sub-components, and the contribution from non-verbal ability and general processing speed was also studied. The results demonstrated that decoding made the largest contribution to reading ability for children with reading difficulties, while language comprehension contributed the most for children with typical reading ability. The contribution of non-verbal ability was not significant, and general processing speed only made a significant contribution to decoding for typical children. The two factors in the Simple View of Reading, decoding and comprehension, together explained less of the variance in reading ability for children with reading difficulties than for children with typical reading ability.

  • 11.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Why Do Some Resist Phonological Intervention?: A Swedish longitudinal study of poor readers in Grade 42000In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 145 -162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n a longitudinal intervention study, 33 Swedish poor readers in Grade 4 received phonological awareness instruction over 1 year. Three control groups were included in the study: Grade 4 controls, Grade 2 controls (both comparable in reading skill) and normal readers. The results showed that the phonological training group made the most progress in phonological awareness but did not improve their reading skills any more than the controls. However, a re-analysis of the results revealed important individual differences within the phonological training group. Some children improved their reading ability considerably, while others seemed resistant to the intervention. One critical difference between improved and resistant readers was identified. For the improved readers, both orthographic and phonological word decoding predicted text reading performance. For the resistant readers, only orthographic decoding skills predicted text reading before, during and after the intervention, in spite of a steady increase in phonological awareness.

  • 12.
    Hegender, Henrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    The Assessment of student teachers’ academic and professional knowledge in school-based teacher education2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 151-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to scrutinize the assessment of teacher knowledge in a school-based course at one Swedish pre-service teacher education (TE) programme. In a General Education school-based course teacher educators visit the student teachers at their school placements and meet them and their school mentors in student-teaching conferences to assess their teacher knowledge. The findings primarily show that the assessment procedures are influenced by teacher educators’ organisation of the school visits and conferences. Secondly, the organisation of the school visits and conferences influences who the potential and actual assessors at the conferences can be and are. Thirdly, the assessed student teacher knowledge at the conferences is described as procedural knowledge in a knowledge-in-practice perspective, almost exclusively in the area of relational, emotional and caring learning objectives and aspects of teaching activities. Fourthly, the findings show that propositional knowledge in a knowledge-for-practice perspective is hardly mentioned or assessed.

  • 13.
    Hultman, Glenn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Educational Science (IUV).
    Managerial Work, Organizational Perspectives, and the Training of Managers.1984In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 199-210Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Hultman, Glenn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Educational Science (IUV).
    The State of the Art of School Administration: a review of facts and theory1989In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 123-162Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Hultén, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Larsson, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The Flipped Classroom: Primary and Secondary Teachers’ Views on an Educational Movement in Schools in Sweden Today2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 433-443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to contribute to an increased understanding of the flipped classroom movement. A total of 7 teachers working in school years 4–9 and who both actively flipped their classrooms and had been early adopters in this movement were interviewed. Two research questions were posed: “What characterizes flipped classroom instruction according to the teachers?” and “What objectives do the flipped classroom meet according to the teachers?” Regarding the first research question, a characteristic of a flipped classroom was “the flip,” a task to be accomplished outside the classroom before class. In relation to the second research question we found three objectives: Student activity in class; Educational change; Being part of a digital learning community.

  • 16.
    Jungert, Tomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Self-efficacy Beliefs in Mathematics, Native Language Literacy and Foreign Language Amongst Boys and Girls with and without Mathematic Difficulties2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to examine achievement and self-efficacy in mathematics and native and foreign language literacy in children with specific mathematic LD (MD-only), children with comorbid mathematic and reading difficulties (MD-RD), and compare them with children without LD (controls), as well as to explore gender differences. Participants were 143 fifth-graders in Sweden who completed National Tests and measures of self-efficacy in mathematics and literacy. The MD-RD children displayed lower self-efficacy in all subjects compared to the controls, even when controlling for achievement. The MD-only children displayed lower self-efficacy in mathematics, completely accounted for by their lower mathematic achievement. The lower self-efficacy for children with learning disabilities may primarily be explained by their history of low achievement interpreted as failures and their emphasis on negative appraisals.

  • 17.
    Kempe, Camilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning and Didactic Science in Education and School (PeDiUS). Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Eriksson Gustavsson, Anna-Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning and Didactic Science in Education and School (PeDiUS). Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning and Didactic Science in Education and School (PeDiUS). Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Are There Any Matthew Effects in Literacy and Cognitive Development?2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, ISSN 0031-3831, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 181-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Matthew effect is often used as a metaphor to describe a widening gap between good

    and poor readers over time. In this study we examined the development of individual

    differences in reading and cognitive functioning in children with reading difficulties and

    normal readers from Grades 1 to 3. Matthew effects were observed for individual

    differences in reading comprehension and vocabulary, but not on tests measuring word

    decoding, word recognition, or spelling, nor on non-verbal ability. However, these

    Matthew effects disappeared when controlling for home literacy activities and parent

    reading behavior, indicating that print exposure is one environmental condition involved

    in mediating Matthew effects. These findings are in line with the idea of the Matthew

    effect by Stanovich and the core assumption that reading comprehension is involved in

    a reciprocal relationship with vocabulary knowledge.

     

  • 18.
    Lidström, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekbladh, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Individual Adjustment Needs for Students in Regular Upper Secondary School2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate student-environment fit and perceived need of adjustments for students in the regular upper secondary school, with and without a diagnosis. The students (n = 419) were interviewed with the assessment School Setting Interview. The results showed that for seven of the 16 items, 60% or more of the students experienced that the demands of the school environment were not consistent with their abilities. Girls had a greater need of adjustments in eight of nine SSI school activities. The findings put an emphasis on the importance of recognizing the students individuals need of adjustments, and on offering flexible support in order to enhance the student-environment-fit and well-being of students in need of special educational support.

  • 19.
    Lindgren, Anne-Li
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stereotypes at Work in Classroom Interactions: Pupils Talk about the Police in School Cinema Activities in Sweden2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 59, no 5, p. 515-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The empirical investigation in this paper develops the perspective of media in education by focusing on how the use of film in education stimulates the production of cultural, societal and social values and norms in school when pupils talk about “the police” in school cinema activities in Sweden. “Police” is regarded as a keyword and stereotype and the analysis focuses on how difference is created and negotiated between pupils and between pupils and teachers. Moreover, the paper highlights how acknowledging or disavowing difference is used by the pupils to position themselves. The result suggests that pupils create the police as negative and positive sign to gain position as: (1) included in a welfare society and (2) as problem solvers in the classroom (and society).

  • 20.
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning.
    Teachers' work with documentation in preschool: Shaping a profession in the per-forming of professional identities2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 59, no 6, p. 638-655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses how the teaching profession takes shape when policy demands on increased documentation in preschool is interpreted and enacted by teachers. The profession and professional identities take shape in the tension between two forms of professionalism: occupational professionalism, based on collegial authority, and organizational professionalism, regulated by policy, bureaucracy, and markets. Interviews with preschool teachers about documentation and parents highlight how different professional identities not only took form in the policy interpretation process, but also worked as arguments for ways of dealing with change. A major conclusion is that it would be a win-win situation for professionals, children/parents, and central/local authorities if the influence of occupational professionalism was strengthened through a revaluation of teachers' experiences and professional standards.

  • 21.
    Markström, Ann-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Alasuutari, Maarit
    Jyväskylä universitet, Finland.
    The making of the ordinary child in preschool.2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 517-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines parent-teacher conferences in Finnish and Swedish preschools. Previous research has shown that the conferences are mostly about the evaluation of the child. Based on qualitative data, the article studies how this evaluation is done. It asks how the institutional order regarding children is constructed in parent-teacher conferences and what the ordinary child is like that this order presumes. The theoretical framework is adopted from social constructionist research on childhood and institutions. The analysis applies a discourse analytic framework. The results suggest that being and becoming social is the key expectation for a child in Finnish and Swedish preschools; formal education and learning are not often mentioned. In addition, the results show that generational and gendered assumptions are important elements in the institutional order of preschool.

  • 22.
    Markström, Ann-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Närvänen, Anna-Liisa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Co-producing Children´s Sociality in Parent-teacher Conferences2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 59, no 5, p. 546-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to describe how parents and preschool teachers talk about children's interactional skills in parent–teacher conferences in the Swedish preschool and how this can be related to socialization processes. The analyses show that children's communicative skills, such as turn-taking in conversation and co-operation, are considered as important for both parents and teachers and talked about in terms of trouble or success. Children's skills are often assessed by using chronological age as a parameter. Our analysis suggests that the talk about children's interactional skills may be interpreted in terms of deficiency discourses founded primarily on theories in developmental psychology, and that parents, and particularly the teachers, present themselves as socializing agents with regard to children.

  • 23.
    Nordvall, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Fridolfsson, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Folk High School: A Contemporary Educational Pathway for Swedish Parliamentarians?2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 347-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore the contemporary role of the folk highschool as an educational pathway for Swedish MPs. Statistics from the folkhigh school register at Statistics Sweden are analysed. In summary, thereare still quite a large number of former folk high school participants inthe Swedish parliament (27%, 2014). The MPs’ folk high schoolparticipation mainly took the form of short courses. Over time, the folkhigh schools have increasingly come to be used by members of partieson the left of the political spectrum. The folk high schools arecommonly used as meeting places during the MPs’ political career, andthus not only as an educational pathway to power, as emphasised inearlier research.

  • 24.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    The Development of Word-decoding Skills in Young Readers1996In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 325-332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of the research on the acquisition of word-decoding skills has almost exclusively focused on the ability to read words in isolation. The purpose of this article is to extend our knowledge to the independent role of phonological and orthographic word-decoding skills in the reading tasks which children encounter in school. The data were quite consistent with the general core of models suggesting that children first become proficient in phonological decoding then gradually shift towards a more direct orthographic-decoding strategy. As such, these findings have helped to generalize models of the acquisition of word-decoding skills to reading comprehension.

  • 25.
    Stolpe, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Björklund, Lars-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Students' long-term memories from an ecology field excursion: Retelling a narrative as an interplay between implicit and explicit memories2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 277-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to investigate the science content remembered by biology students 6 and 12 months after an ecology excursion. The students' memories were tested during a stimulated recall interview. The authors identified three different types of memories: recall, recognition and narratives. The dual memory system model of learning was used to connect recall to the explicit memory system (declarative knowledge), and recognition to the implicit memory system (tacit knowledge). The results show that the students' re-told narratives were scrambled and sometimes distorted. The students used small fragments to create their story and the next fragment of the story primarily depended on the antecedent unit. It is therefore suggested that in telling a narrative there is a constant interplay between the explicit (recall) and implicit (recognition) memory systems. The scientific terms (recall) were often replaced by everyday terms, indicating that the underlying meaning is not connected to the specific terms.

  • 26.
    Szklarski, Andrzej
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Conflict experience: A phenomenological study among young people in Sweden2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 369-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate how young people in Sweden experience conflicts. The study is phenomenological, which means that the focus is on the essence of the investigated experience. Data have been collected by self-reports and analyzed with the help of an empirical phenomenological method. The research process has resulted in delimitation of three constituents which are essential for the conflict experience. The core of this experience consists of anger, mental strain and unfair treatment. Anger is the most predominant in conflict situations and strongly influences the style of conflict management.

  • 27.
    Säljö, Roger
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wyndhamn, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cognitive Operations and Educational Framing of Tasks: School as a Context for Arithmetic Thought1988In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 61-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive Operations and Educational Framing of Tasks. School as a Context for Arithmetic Thought. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 32, 61‐71. The purpose of the present study is to contribute to the understanding of the contextual determination of cognitive activities. In a naturalistic experiment in a primary school setting it is shown how performance at group level on an elementary arithmetic task is influenced by the immediate context in which this problem is presented. Differences in performance between groups at various achievement levels in mathematics are amplified by corresponding differences in discovering and utilizing analogies between problems as heuristic aids. This latter kind of difference reflects – it is argued – variations in abilities in analysing and deciphering cognitive tasks at a linguistic and meta‐communicative level rather than in mastering the specific algorithmic tools. It is also argued that the functional meaning of the task as pedagogical praxis may differ between contexts.

  • 28.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning and Didactic Science in Education and School (PeDiUS). Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Informed grounded theory2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 243-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a widespread idea that in grounded theory (GT) research, the researcher has to delay the literature review until the end of the analysis to avoid contamination - a dictum that might turn educational researchers away from GT. Nevertheless, in this article the author (a) problematizes the dictum of delaying a literature review in classic grounded theory, (b) presents arguments for using extant literature in the substantive field within a constructivist grounded theory, and (c) suggests data sensitizing principles in using literature, which are: theoretical agnosticism, theoretical pluralism, theoretical sampling of literature, staying grounded, theoretical playfulness, memoing extant knowledge associations, and constant reflexivity.

  • 29.
    Wallner, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Gutter Talk: Co-Constructing Narratives Using Comics in the Classroom2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 63, no 6, p. 819-838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article combines theory on comics, narrative, and discursive psychology and analyses how the gutter is co-constructed for storytelling in classroom interaction. Closure of the gutter has previously been treated as a cognitive aspect. Here, interactional video data are analysed, with participants organizing ten separate comic panels. The analysis focuses on participants’ talk about the gutter, and how this constructs social actions. The results show how participants co-construct the gutter as meaningful space, hereby organizing time, actions, and events in narratives. The paper evinces that gutters are co-constructed as too narrow or too broad, relating chronologically and logically to surrounding panels. This contributes to sociocultural perspectives on literacy and use of comics for engaging with narratives in classroom practice.

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