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  • 1.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Professional practice, education and learning: A sociomaterial perspective2018In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 239-241Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Köpsén, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Larson, Anne
    Danish School of Education, Aarhus University.
    Milana, Marcella
    Danish School of Education, Aarhus University.
    Qualification paths of adult educators in Sweden and Denmark2013In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 102-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The qualification of adult educators is a central aspect of the quality of adult education. However, within current policy discourses and adult education research on the professional development of prospective adult educators, little attention is paid to teacher qualification when compared to other fields of education and training. In this study, we analyse the qualification paths, or learning trajectories, of prospective adult educators in Sweden and Denmark. The analysis is based on narrative interviews with 29 students in training to become adult educators. The career paths of adult educators are often long and winding roads. Becoming an adult educator could be their primary desire, but it could also be their ‘Plan B’, a second choice. Individual motives and external demands interact in the professionalisation process. A shift in focus from teaching subject and methods to teaching context and the relation to the learners is part of the professional development. Finally, we argue that both academic studies and hands-on work in the adult education community are crucial parts of the adult educator’s qualification path.

  • 3.
    Bolldén, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Teachers' embodied presence in online teaching practices2016In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 38, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to examine teachers’ embodiments online. The analysis is based ononline ethnographic data from two online courses in higher education settings usingdifferent information and communication technologies. The perspective of practicetheory and the concepts of being a body, having a body and the instrumental body wereused to analyse how teachers step into an embodied presence. The embodied presencedepends on both teacher judgements and what the technology offers. The finding addsto the understanding of the concept of teacher presence online, in showing that teacherembodiment occurs online and furthermore that the body could be understood asmultiple. The result also shows how online and offline bodies hang together,actualising the offline body in the online setting, which in turn raises questions onthe dualism of online and offline. Teachers also deliberately used their embodimentsand bodily traces online in order to sustain presence and to bring about certain teachingpractices. Their bodily positioning signalled what kind of teaching that would takeplace. A deliberate positioning of the online body in a virtual world also helped toreduce the complexity of the arrangements for the students.

  • 4.
    Bredlöv, Eleonor
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Shaping the female student: an analysis of Swedish beauty school recruitment texts2016In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 243-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on the recruitment of adults to the beauty industry in Sweden. It is concerned with a move in (beauty) education away from state and towards private provision in a wider context where education is becoming more heavily marketised. Drawing on a poststructural approach inspired by the work of Foucault and feminist theory, the shaping of student subjectivity in recruitment material for private beauty schools is analysed. A poststructural approach provides analytical tools that make visible the process of how power shapes subjectivities, and the use of feminist theory gives special focus to the gendered aspects of this process. The study includes a textual analysis of website homepages of beauty schools, beauty schools’ Facebook pages and web pages that provide compiled information on educational programs and courses connected to the beauty industry. The analysis shows how consumption is constituted and feminised through specific marketing strategies and thereby becomes both a starting point and a resource for the shaping of student subjectivity. Thus, a particular form of gendered entrepreneurial self is shaped in this femininised educational context, and this study therefore highlights the importance of vocational research that takes into account the shaping of student subjectivity.

  • 5.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Discourses on Employability: Constituting the Responsible Citizen2010In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 89-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last couple of decades, there has been a shift from speaking about employment to speaking about employability. The interest in this article is directed at how discourses on employability are mobilized in the wider discursive terrain of governance. How does governance operate, what subject is produced and, more specifically, who is positioned as responsible for the employability of the citizen through such discourses? These questions are addressed by analysing three different kinds of texts: transnational policy documents on lifelong learning and the labour market; a Swedish policy text on in-service training in the health care sector; interviews with employees at six nursing homes for elderly people. A discourse analysis is performed inspired by the concepts of governmentality and the enabling state. Although the analysis indicate that the individual is constructed as responsible for her/his own employability, and the state and the employer are construed as enablers. This is not clear-cut or deterministic as different kinds of texts produce different kinds of positioning. This kind of analysis might help open up a new space for thought and action.

  • 6.
    Fejes, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nicoll, Katherine
    University of Stirling.
    Activating the worker in elderly care: A technique and tactics of invitation2011In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 333, no 3, p. 235-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relatively little attention has been paid to questions of how language acts in and through the interactions of language in situations where people are encouraged to learn to be active in contexts of work. This paper argues that detailed analysis is needed to understand how activation through language acts in the shaping and governing of workers. By combining resources from Michel Foucault and the conversation analysis of Jonathan Potter, we analyse observational notes and records of conversation from work activities at a nursing home for elderly people in Sweden. A technique and tactics of invitation are identified as operating through language interactions at work in attempts at the shaping of activate and responsibilise workers. This analysis contributes to wider discussions over how attempts are made to shape subjectivities at work.

  • 7.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Managing Mobility for Learning, Health and Innovation (HELIX).
    Facilitating expansive learning in a public sector organization2009In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 245-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to discuss how learning opportunities can be organized to promote expansive learning in work practice. The discussion draws on results from a case study examining local development work and conditions that facilitate processes of expansive learning in a work team within a public sector organization in a Swedish municipality. An interactive research design was used. Data were collected over almost four years through individual and group interviews with 12 workers in a work team and their three managers. In addition data were collected through observations of team meetings. The findings demonstrate that work can be organized as a learning environment to facilitate expansive learning even in a resource-limited public sector organization. Furthermore, patterns of expansive learning were evident in the work team's new work activities and new relationships in the organization. The findings also demonstrate the need to support managers in developing a role to facilitate expansive learning. However, the need for and extent of external support for promoting expansive learning in practice vary in different situations and stages during the development work.

  • 8.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Learning to promote health at an emergency care department: identifying expansive and restrictive conditions2015In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 18-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on the findings of a planned workplace health promotion intervention, and the aim is to identify conditions that facilitated or restricted the learning to promote health at an emergency care department in a Swedish hospital. The study had a longitudinal design, with interviews before and after the intervention and follow-up interviews one year after the intervention. Data were collected through individual interviews with employees and managers, in total 69 interviews. In addition, data were collected from documents. The study provided insight into conditions which were found to act as expansive and restrictive reinforcements for learning to promote health. The conclusion is that the workplace health promotion intervention was shaped by conditions that existed outside the local workplace level which restricted the workplace health promotion. Nevertheless, collective employee-driven activities had the capacity to facilitate learning for change in order to create a health-promoting workplace. The advantage of combining theories of learning and workplace health promotion provided a holistic analytical view of learning to promote health at work and helped to uncover and monitor changed conditions during a planned workplace health promotion intervention.

  • 9.
    Hallqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life.
    Occupational transitions as a relational project2012In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 83-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Looking at ‘biographical learning’ as part of a work transition, the aim of this paper is to investigate how social relations enable and constrain such a learning process in outplacement clients. To examine the process, its character and social conditions, the study draws on interviews with workers who had been made redundant and were enrolled at an outplacement agency. The interviews were analysed using a comparative cross-case analysis. A distinction was made between ‘strong’ (long-term and intimate), ‘weak’ (short-term and non-intimate) and ‘formal’ (e.g., professional counsellors) relations. Findings showed that strong and formal relations were rather influential on people's engagement in biographical learning while weak relations were important to the straightforward career. Since transitions in late modern society has become not only a passage but also a learning option, the different sources and functions of social relations should be considered a vital part of outplacement counselling. Future research should examine more closely both parties in strong relationships and the (joint) process of career decision-making inherent in occupational transitions.

  • 10.
    Hallqvist, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    End of journey, end of story? A longitudinal study of involuntary work transitions among laid-off workers2014In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 201-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to increase knowledge regarding involuntary work transitions among laid-off workers. It is part of an ongoing cooperation with two outplacement agencies enrolling white-collar workers. The particular arrangements, which are based on collective agreements, include relatively generous support, both economically and regarding the educational and counselling arrangements offered. A narrative research approach is used and the analysis is based on interviews with 15 people, conducted on two occasions with about a year in between. Conceptualizing the transition as a biographical learning process, the findings point out a great variety within and between cases. While the basic distinction is drawn between people who have changed their status and those who have not, a number of rhetorical varieties are identified, pointing to different modes of biographical learning. The originality of the paper lies in its narrative approach and the particular conceptual framework showing that biographical learning is a vital part of enforced work transitions.

  • 11.
    Hallqvist, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Work transitions as told: a narrative approach to biographical learning2013In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we introduce a narrative approach to biographical learning; that is, an approach that considers autobiographical storytelling as a practice through which claims about life history are performed and negotiated. Using insights from narrative theory, we highlight evaluations in those narratives and suggest their crucial role in promoting self-reflective thought. The research area is unemployment, more specifically, work transitions following company restructuring and redundancy supported by outplacement services. Recognizing the learning potential in autobiographical storytelling, the article examines job-loss narratives told by people made redundant. The analysis focuses on strategies used in moments of evaluation. Our findings point to a variety of rhetorical strategies, different kinds of reflexivity and, in turn, variation in the potential for biographical learning.

  • 12.
    Hjelmfors, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kärner, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Problem-based learning used in the context of cardiac rehabilitation: different scenes and different roles2014In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 218-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies show that how patients have difficulties in changing lifestyle even though such changes are essential because they are suffering from a life-threatening disease. Coronary artery disease (CAD) patients met 13 times during a year and used problem-based learning (PBL) to improve their empowerment and self-efficacy in making lifestyle changes. District nurses functioned as tutors, helping patients to formulate issues and to state self-care goals. To identify and describe the enactment of PBL, an ethnographic approach was used, including, for example, participant observations and interviews, all derived from six sessions of the education programme. Five different enactments were found, metaphorically expressed as: ‘The study circle’, ‘The classroom’, ‘The expert consultation’, ‘The therapy session’ and ‘The coffee party’. The education programme did not always function as it was supposed to according to the model, but perhaps this should not be seen as a failure of the pedagogical intervention since these enactments as a whole seem to be a way for the patients to be able to make healthy lifestyle changes. The metaphors can broaden the understanding of what can happen when implementing problem-based learning in health care practice.

  • 13.
    Hultman, Glenn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Educational Science (IUV).
    Klasson, Alger
    IPP LIU.
    Paradoxes, Mini-worlds and Learning Processes: the dynamics of change in small companies.1998In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 51-69Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Köpsén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Demands-based and employer-driven curricula: defining knowledge in higher vocational education and training2019In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Access to, and participation in, higher education is expanding. Commonalities in the organisation of this expansion are distinctive vocational pathways, liberal marketisation and significant employer influence. However, whether this expanded access to higher education in vocational pathways is contributing to opportunities of social mobility for the students accessing higher education in this way is questioned. This article explores one way to investigate this by focusing on knowledge in VET curricula – specifically knowledge which students in higher VET get access to. Knowledge in VET curricula can both reproduce existing social divisions and inequalities or support social mobility, as knowledge may both include and exclude from social power. Thus, possible reproduction of stratification may be tracked in formation of curricula. In this article, the Swedish system of higher VET established in 2009 serves as the case for a policy analysis examining what knowledge policy defines for higher VET curricula. The analysis shows a dominant definition of legitimate knowledge as that generated in the production of goods and services and selected by locally involved employers. This is a definition of knowledge for higher VET in line with a global focus on differentiation in higher education rather than on equality of outcomes.

  • 15.
    Köpsén, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The practice of supervision for professional learning: the exampel of future forensic specialists2015In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 30-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supervision intended to support learning is of great interest in professional knowledge development. No single definition governs the implementation and enactment of supervision because of different conditions, intentions, and pedagogical approaches. Uncertainty exists at a time when knowledge and methods are undergoing constant development. This situation affects professions with high demands on precision and safety, and thus supervision and learning. The aim of this article is to explore the practice of supervision for learning professional knowledge of forensic specialists. The context is the Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science internal training program, which focuses on learning in daily work when the forensic trainee is assigned a supervisor. Ethnographic studies of supervisors and trainees in different forensic specialties were conducted. Practice theory is used to understand how supervision is planned and implemented to support professional development. Findings show that supervision by seasoned professional forensic specialists is significant for trainee learning. However, supervision is arranged, and performed differently, indicating various conditions for learning. Furthermore, the material set-ups of the professional practice prefigure the practice of supervision. Supervision is an area of expertise that needs to be cultivated and learned to maintain highly specialized professional knowledge in current time of change and uncertainty.

  • 16.
    Lögdlund, Ulrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Constructing learning spaces? Videoconferencing at local learning centres in Sweden2010In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 183-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores videoconferencing in the context of local learning centres in Sweden. The practice is described as a learning space in which adult learners construct socio-spatial relations. The study goes beyond a sociological apprehension of actors and opposes the idea of the material as neutral, passive and conformed by practice. On the contrary, the classroom layouts and the technical artefacts have a profound impact on interaction, communication and learning. The results of the study concern how human actors have to take on different strategies to escape the influence of material actors. It will be argued that the learning space of videoconferencing is a network of interrelations in which control is handed over from humans to material actors. In terms of learning, we may have to rethink the roles of environments and technical artifacts and reconsider such predetermined and static roles of material objects.

  • 17.
    Mbabazi, Penelope
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlgren, Lars-Owe
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    A phenomenographic study of students' conceptions of quality in learning in higher education in Rwanda2013In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 337-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to understand the different ways that university students conceptualise quality in learning by drawing on a phenomenographic approach. A total of 20 students in higher education in Rwanda were interviewed and analysis of the interviews generated an outcome space of conceptions of quality in learning as transformation, practice, knowledge durability and employability. The findings illustrate the importance of the relationship between education and work as an important aspect of conceptions of quality in learning. This relationship connects to the discourse of employability in which graduates are expected to become flexible and adaptable to changes in context and over the course of time.

  • 18.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rubenson, Kjell
    University of British Columbia, Centre for Policy Studies in Education and Training, Department of Educational Studies.
    On the determinants of employment-related organised education and informal learning2014In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 304-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the distribution of employment-related organised education and informal learning in the Canadian workforce. The paper draws on a large-scale survey, the Changing Nature of Work and Lifelong Learning (WALL), which was based on structured and standardised telephone interviews with a representative sample of 5783 Canadian members of the employed labour force. In exploring the determinants facilitating employment-related informal learning, three analytical categories of factors derived from previous research on learning participation were used: individual-level factors, job characteristics and workplace environment. The analyses focus on differences in individuals, jobs and workplace characteristics among adult workers who acquired or improved their job-related skills through different training pathways. In addition, analyses were performed to compare the extent to which these factors differ in their influence on learning decisions among workers who combine both organised education and informal learning and those who receive only informal learning. The results indicate that important predictors of participation in employment-related organised education and informal learning are age, educational attainment, learning skills, occupational class, education-job relation, degree of autonomy, degree of labour intensity, principal area of production and organisation size.

  • 19.
    Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlgren, Lars Owe
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    A winding road - professional trajectories from higher education to working life: a case study of political science and psychology graduates2008In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 215-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative and longitudinal study focuses on graduate employment and the development of graduate employment paths. The aim of this article is to explore the present professional trajectory from higher education to working life, with particular reference to graduates from two different study programmes at Linko¨ping University in Sweden: Political Science and Psychology. More specifically, the article focuses on how graduates construe their professional trajectories in terms of their envisaged future work as senior students, and later as novice and early-career professionals with 18 and 34 months of work life experience. The results indicate that graduates’ professional identities and vision of their future work change over time. The set of categories, depicting the graduates’ vision and experiences of their professional trajectories, do not seem to follow a specific temporal and logical progression in their career. Rather, they appear in different order and at different points in time after graduation. The results, instead, endorse the discourse of lifelong learning and the need for flexibility and employability on the labour market.

  • 20.
    Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Continuing professional development: pedagogical practices of interprofessional simulation in health care2017In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 303-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing complexity of health care practice makes continuing professional development (CPD) essential for health care professionals. Simulation-based training is a CPD activity that is often applied to improve interprofessional collaboration and the quality of care. The aim of this study is to explore simulation as a pedagogical practice for the CPD of health care professionals. Specifically, the study focuses on how a professional development activity, the simulation, is enacted to support interprofessional collaboration and learning. A practice theory perspective is used as the theoretical framework. In this, the professional practice is conceptualised as being embodied, relational and situated in sociomaterial arrangements. Ten introduction and reflection sessions following interprofessional full-scale manikin-based simulations with professionals were video-recorded. The recordings were analysed following a stepwise qualitative collaborative approach developed for the purpose. The key findings suggest that the professional competence activity is enacted and interconnected with and governed by historical traditions of institutional teaching practices as well as simulation practices. Despite the intentions of team and interprofessional training, the institutional teaching and simulation practices constrain and hinder the intended outcomes of professional development in interprofessional collaboration.

  • 21.
    Reichenpfader, Ursula
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wickström, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Our surgeons want this to be short and simple: practices of in-hospital medication review as coordinated sociomaterial actions2018In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 323-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Medication review, a systematic assessment of a patients medicines by a health care professional, is intended to prevent medication-related harms. A critical element of medication review concerns whether medication review is conducted in a coordinated way. This article draws from a case example of implementing medication review in two surgical wards of a Swedish regional hospital and aims to analyse how medication review is being accomplished with respect to the coordination of its actions. Using a practice-based ethnographic approach, we present several coordination mechanisms by illustrating how practices are connected to materials involved in medication review. Also, we show how common orientations, ends, and understandings expressed in different medication review practices contribute to the coordination of the practices. In conclusion, this article highlights the complexity of establishing and sustaining medication review as a coordinated practice in routine health care. By closely examining sociomaterial connections, this article sheds new light on the neglected issue of artefacts and arrangements in constituting and transforming a highly complex medication practice.

  • 22.
    Sandberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Lund University, Sweden.
    Recognition and adult education: an incongruent opportunity2016In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 265-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on narratives of students in adult education in Sweden, where the majority of the students are young adults, this paper argues that adult education has both negative and positive aspects in helping individuals to be recognised as valuable. Students, often part of the precariat class, have not always been able to survive in the job market and have a history of failing in upper secondary school. By drawing on the recognition theory of Axel Honneth, the results show that municipal adult education has the potential to be a transitory learning platform in which the individual can regain esteem that has been lost due to unemployment, precarious employment and failure in upper secondary school. It provides temporary stability. Yet, most students are in a sense forced to study and it is not patent that adult education can help them in their struggle for self-actualisation.

  • 23.
    Sandberg, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Kubiak, Chris
    Open University.
    Recognition of prior learning, self-realisation and identity within Axel Honneth´s theory of recognition2013In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 351-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper argues for the significance of Axel Honneth's theory of recognition for understanding recognition of prior learning (RPL). Case studies of the experiences of RPL by paraprofessional workers in health and social care in the UK and Sweden are used to explicate this significance. The results maintain that there are varying conditions of recognition. These conditions are often fluid, negotiable and ambivalent. However, RPL appears to support self-realisation and self-awareness, when it co-occurs with individual's identification with associated practices. Workplace salary, affordances for practice and collegial values may shape the esteem and thus the potential for self-realisation. RPL can thus help facilitate the development of a more positive relationship to individuals engaged in RPL processes, enhancing their learning and development.

  • 24.
    Shan, Hongxia
    et al.
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Editorial Material: Skill regime in the context of globalization and migration in STUDIES IN CONTINUING EDUCATION, vol 37, issue 3, pp 227-2352015In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 227-235Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 25.
    Sin, Samantha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Reid, Anna
    Conservatorium of Music, Sydney University, Australia.
    Dahlgren, Lars-Ove
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    The conceptions of work in the accounting profession in the twenty-first century from the experiences of practitioners2011In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 139-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The accounting profession, which has commercialised its services extensively in the past two to three decades, is facing the challenges of change. An early and concerted response to the changes in the scope of work was the emphasis on developing generic skills in accounting higher education. This study recognises the relevance of accounting practitioners’ experiences of the manifestations of change in actual work situations and investigates their conceptions of accounting work. A phenomenographic approach identified practitioners’ focus of awareness on the functional, outcome and ethical aspects of accounting work. In particular, practitioners described the prevalence of ethics in all facets of their work, their autonomous position and ethical tensions. The pressures of commercialism are also reflected in their conceptions. The findings have raised concerns regarding the adequacy of the present curriculum for preparing accounting graduates for the ethical challenges of work in today's accounting profession. The relevance of developing professional values and identities as a trajectory both within and beyond university learning is advanced.

  • 26.
    Sparrhoff, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Social theory and education research: understanding Foucault, Habermas, Bourdieu and Derrida2015In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 118-120Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 27.
    Vesterberg, Viktor
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Learning to be swedish: governing migrants in labour-market projects2015In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 302-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on adult learning in labour-market projects targeting unemployed migrants in Sweden. Drawing on a Foucauldian analysis of governmentality, the results of the study problematize the ways that such projects produce individualizing discourses – targeting individuals, constructing them as responsible for their position as unemployed. The project’s target groups are generally defined not on the basis of ethnicity as such, but rather using terms such as non-Nordic background, foreign born and immigrants. However, two groups considered especially problematic are constructed through ethnicity: Somali and Roma people. The notion of social competency is analysed here as a way of constructing the unemployed migrants as not yet employable. Another significant result concerns the notion of gender equality, which makes migrants governable because it constructs boundaries between Swedishness and Otherness. In line with this rationality, the targeted migrants are governed towards Swedishness through learning gender equality. These results raise a number of issues of great concern for the inclusion of migrants in the labour market, as they highlight a paradoxical relationship between the inclusive ambitions of interventions targeting unemployed migrants and the ethnicized discourses of ‘Othering’ that imbue these learning practices.

  • 28.
    Wieslander, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Learning the (hidden) silence policy within the police2018In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many organisations declare that the ability for employees to speak out about organisational matters is important for organisational development. However, recent literature reports a widespread fear of retaliation among employees if they express themselves – especially within the police. The point of departure of the present article is the tension and discrepancy between official policy and officers’ accounts of the conversational climate within the police. Through empirical examples from data consisting of field studies and 33 interviews with police officers in subordinate ranks, this article describes how employees learn and reproduce informal norms that condition the conversational and working climate within the organisation. In contrast to official guidelines within the police, employees learn the informal cultural norms of keeping a low profile and remaining silent through everyday talk. Theories that stress how discourses, storytelling, and noisy silences accomplish social action are used to explain why these informal norms are given such power within an institutional setting.

  • 29.
    Åkerblom, Erika
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Sweden.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Constructing a healthy, knowledgeable and well-educated citizen: Motivational interviews and physical activity on prescription2017In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 320-332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades education has been suggested as an importantvsolution to current problems of the population’s health. A high level of education in general is construed as essential for the nation’s well-being and competitiveness. In this article we problematise the ways in which discourses on education, learning and health have become interlinked. Drawing on a post-structural theorisation inspired by Michel Foucault, we analyse Swedish policy documents on education and public health and direct our attention to how the healthy citizen is shaped and fostered. We illustrate how the healthy citizen emerges in opposition to the non-healthy, non-desirable and abnormal citizen. Citizens are made responsible for identifying their deficits and suggesting solutions. Governing techniques, such as motivational interviews and physical activity on prescription, operates in order to shape such citizens. Through these techniques, a confessional relation emerges, where citizens are invited to disclose their deficits and problems and in so doing shape themselves in a desired way.

1 - 29 of 29
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