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  • 1.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ahn, Song-Ee
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Recognition of Prior Vocational Learning in Sweden2004In: Studies in the Education of Adults, ISSN 0266-0830, E-ISSN 1478-9833, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 57-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Initiatives in the recognition of prior learning (RPL) have been taken in Sweden in recent years, mainly focusing on prior vocational learning among immigrants. The government started different projects to find methods for recognising a person’s prior learning in the field of vocational competence. This article presents a study of how these projects were organised and their starting points. Differences are identified concerning whether they were integrated with, or parallel to, the school system, and whether the starting point was a few vocations or a number of different vocations (depending on the background of the participants). The article then looks at some problems that arise when trying to recognise prior learning. We find that knowledge of the Swedish language is essential in this process, but that the demands are flexible and the criteria informal. The article also discusses the relationship between RPL and the educational system, where most of the projects had problems in not being too influenced by the school tradition where the main documentation of competence is grades. Finally, the article discusses conditions for the development of trust in RPL.

  • 2.
    Colliander, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Being transformed and transforming oneself in a time of change: A study of teacher identity in second language education for adults2019In: Studies in the Education of Adults, ISSN 0266-0830, E-ISSN 1478-9833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    This paper takes a perspective on professional identity in times of change to explore what societal changes of significance for second language education for adults mean for the teacher’s professional identity. It differs, thus, from many other studies on teacher identity, which concentrate on one educational reform. The study, which applies situated learning theory, is built on semi-structured interviews with 13 teachers in this sector. The results show that migration, marketization and streamlining, and digitalisation imply changes, which have a profound effect on the teachers. Whereas some changes mean that the teachers can develop their teaching or strengthen their position in work-related communities, other changes restrict them. Moreover, the response of the teachers depends on their judgement about what the changes mean for their teaching and the learners. Teachers position themselves by, for example, claiming to possess the competence they see as essential to meet the learners’ needs.

  • 3.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Book review of: Michel Foucault: Materialism and Education by Mark Olssen.2007In: Studies in the Education of Adults, ISSN 0266-0830, E-ISSN 1478-9833, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 245-247Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

          

  • 4.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    What's the use of Foucault in research on lifelong learning and post-compulsory education?: A review of four academic journals2008In: Studies in the Education of Adults, ISSN 0266-0830, E-ISSN 1478-9833, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 7-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to a discussion about the potential use of Foucault in relation to the field of lifelong learning and post-compulsory education. It is based on a qualitative analysis focusing on the uses of Foucault in articles published in four academic journals in this field between 1999 and 2006. Four main uses were construed: an interpretative strategy, an eclectic use, a way to pose an argument and decoration. Based on my findings, I argue that the uses of Foucault in this area of research as represented in these journals are, to a large extent, superficial and, to some extent, more in the nature of a revitalised critical discourse. Further, I argue that uses of Foucault, especially as a main interpretative strategy, help us to make visible our taken-for-granted ideas about adult education and lifelong learning; understand how power operates in these practices; and show the effects of such operations.

  • 5.
    Fejes, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Popular education, migration and a discourse of inclusion2017In: Studies in the Education of Adults, ISSN 0266-0830, E-ISSN 1478-9833, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 214-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we focus on how a discourse on inclusion operates through language learning programmes for migrants. We direct our attention to a new form of activities funded by the Swedish government, Swedish from day 1, organised by popular education institutions. These activities emerged in connection to the migra- tion flows in 2015, receiving large sums in funding from the gov- ernment. They target newly arrived migrants who are waiting for a decision on their resident permit application, and the aim is to provide an introduction to the Swedish language as well as to Swedish society. Drawing on a Foucault-inspired theorization, we direct our attention to how a discourse of inclusion operate through the way these initiatives are spoken about, how these activities are described, what they are intended to attain, and what kind of citizen is shaped through such a way of speaking. We analyse policy documents produced by different actors involved in the process of Swedish from day 1, as well as case study descriptions of courses. We argue that the discourse on inclusion that emerges encompasses a wider as well as an instru- mental notion of inclusion. Migrants are positioned as ‘in deficit’, in need of knowledge in order to become included. Such know- ledge does not limit itself to knowledge of the Swedish language and knowledge about Swedish society, but also knowledge of health issues, and knowledge about how the migrants can market themselves and their competencies. We end the article by relating this discourse on inclusion to a wider discussion on neoliberal rationalities of governing.

  • 6.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Fogelberg Eriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Gendered learning environments in managerial work2010In: Studies in the Education of Adults, ISSN 0266-0830, E-ISSN 1478-9833, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 141-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim is to investigate female and male managers’ learning environments with particular focus on their opportunities for and barriers to learning and career development in the managerial work of a male-dominated industrial company. In the case study 42 managers, 15 women and 27 men in the company were interviewed. The findings demonstrate that the male managers were provided with significantly richer opportunities to participate in activities conducive to learning and career development than were female managers. The opportunities and barriers in terms of horizontal and vertical manager mobility, senior managers’ support, strategic networks, career system, freedom of action and gender stereotypes operated simultaneously as opportunities and barriers to learning and career development for the female and male managers, respectively. The conclusion is that the expansive-restrictive continuum developed by Fuller and Unwin (2004) does not cover the extent to which gender operates as a condition for learning and career development, nor the extent to which the gender order influences the learning environment. Therefore we suggest that the expansive-restrictive model of learning environments would benefit from incorporating or, at least considering, gender dimensions in order to form a gender-sensitive model to analyse learning environments in workplaces.

  • 7.
    Hallqvist, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life.
    Ellström, Per-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The many faces of biographical learning2012In: Studies in the Education of Adults, ISSN 0266-0830, E-ISSN 1478-9833, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 70-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our aim in this article is to look for more diversity within the concept of biographical leaning. As a conceptual tool for investigating learning in life transitions, biographical learning has gained some recognition over recent years. The concept centres on people’s abilities and possibilities to cope with change in a rapidly changing environment. As transitions have become more common, ‘learning processes within transition’ has become an important area for educational research. The development of the concept of biographical learning is related to this trend, since biographical learning processes appear to be more explicitly triggered when a person’s life course is changing and people are faced with transitions in it. In this article, biographical learning will be discussed in relation to research on restructuring, job loss and enforced work transitions. The article will suggest that such transitions may be understood in terms of biographical learning, acknowledging that learning in work transitions is not only about ensuring one’s ‘professional competence’ or ‘employability’ but includes identity issues and decision-making that affect one’s biography.

    Alheit and Dausien portray biographical learning as a certain perspective on lifelong learning, suggesting a ‘shift in analytic perspective’ and a departure from the policy-focused view in which lifelong learning is framed by political and economic precepts. Acknowledging the inner tensions between the ‘instrumentalist’ and ‘emancipative’ power of lifelong learning, the authors place some confidence in the latter, calling for an outlook in which the learning individual ‘is taken more seriously’. There are empirical reasons for such a preference. Although traditional lifeworlds are eroding, people’s responses are not inevitably a ‘panic’ reaction. Instead, people cope with changes rather creatively by using different action strategies that affect both their own biography and the social world in which they live.

    The concept of biographical learning is regarded as useful in this context, firstly because it takes account both of social structures and of the individual’s subjectivity. Hence, it recognizes people’s sense of being able to control their own lives interacting with biographical and structural conditions. Even though life chances are unequally distributed and agency is always ‘bounded’, when people face transitions decisions must be made and actions taken that are affected by and affect their biography. Secondly, biographical learning could be considered valuable because its scope is wider than predominant lifelong learning policies and because its aim extends beyond instrumental skills and ‘employability’. Thirdly, biographical learning can be regarded as helpful because it includes not only formal and organized aspects of learning, but also ‘cognitive and reflexive dimensions of learning as much as the emotional, embodied, pre-reflexive and non-cognitive aspects of everyday learning processes and practices’.

    However, further investigations of the concept are called for, as pointed out by Alheit and Dausien. One possible development concerns challenging its somewhat uniform character. While Alheit has identified three current ‘biographical coping patterns’ (‘patchworking’, ‘networking’ and ‘designing’; Alheit, 1999, p. 75), further analysis will probably reveal new insights and perhaps lead to a more complex description of what biographical learning is. It seems reasonable to assume, for example, that there might be differences between more continuous and more disruptive versions of biographical learning. In order to encompass a wider spectrum of approaches, the aim of this paper is to analyse, explore and expand the notion of biographical learning and to suggest a number of different modes of such learning.

  • 8.
    Sebrant, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings.
    The Impact of Emotion and Power Relations on Workplace Learning.2008In: Studies in the Education of Adults, ISSN 0266-0830, E-ISSN 1478-9833Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 8 of 8
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  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • Other locale
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