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  • 1.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fenwick, Tara
    University of Stirling, Scotland.
    Hopwood, Nick
    University of Technology Sydney, Australia.
    Theorising simulation in higher education: difficulty for learners as an emergent phenomenon2016In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 613-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the widespread interest in using and researching simulation in higher education, little discussion has yet to address a key pedagogical concern: difficulty. A sociomaterial view of learning, explained in this paper, goes beyond cognitive considerations to highlight dimensions of material, situational, representational and relational difficulty confronted by students in experiential learning activities such as simulation. In this paper we explore these dimensions of difficulty through three contrasting scenarios of simulation education. The scenarios are drawn from studies conducted in three international contexts: Australia, Sweden and the UK, which illustrate diverse approaches to simulation and associated differences in the forms of difficulty being produced. For educators using simulation, the key implications are the importance of noting and understanding (1) the effects on students of interaction among multiple forms of difficulty; (2) the emergent and unpredictable nature of difficulty; and (3) the need to teach students strategies for managing emergent difficulty.

  • 2.
    Dahlgren , Lars Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Abrandt-Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Trowald, Nils
    Swedish University of Agriculture.
    Grading systems, features of assessment and students' approaches to learning2009In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 185-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Bologna process aims at harmonising the higher education systems in the Europe. One of the most important tools proposed for such a purpose is the European Credit Transfer System. A significant element of this system is a common seven-step grading scale. It has previously been shown that assessment characteristics impact on students' approaches to learning. Furthermore, there is also empirical evidence that judgement criteria have an effect on students' learning. The focus of this article is on the relationships between grading systems, assessment characteristics and students' learning. Empirical evidence from a Swedish survey study indicates that multi-step grading scales may have detrimental repercussions on the nature of the assessment tasks and thereby indirectly on the students' approaches to learning. We suggest that the effects of grading systems need to be considered in the current discussion in order to support quality in learning.

  • 3.
    Fejes, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Johansson, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Learning to play the seminar game: Some students’ initial encounter with a basic working form in higher education2005In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 29-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates students' initial encounters with the seminar as a working form in higher education. The main interest was to explore how the communication pattern, the aim of the seminar and meaning were negotiated. The results originate from an ethnographic field study where we followed a group of students in a Masters program in Social Science during their first five weeks. Data were analyzed from a socio-cultural perspective and the concepts of participation and reification. We found that there was an implicit negotiation of the communication pattern, what to discuss and the function of the seminar. In these processes, the students and teacher participated in the negotiation of meaning. Different objects were created through a reification process, around which the negotiation of meaning took place.

  • 4.
    Silen, C.
    et al.
    Centre for Teaching and Learning (CUL), Department of Learning Informatics, Management and Ethics, LIME Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uhlin, L.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning and Didactic Science in Education and School (PeDiUS). Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Self-directed learning - A learning issue for students and faculty!2008In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 461-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-directed learning (SDL), is an essential concept in problem-based learning (PBL), and, in a broader sense, student-centred learning. Considering the complex nature of SDL, it has been taken for granted and given a shallow meaning, i.e. self-study. In order to develop a deeper understanding and make use of the potential in SDL, this paper discusses and puts forward a more profound meaning. The importance of regarding becoming a self-directed learner as a learning process, and the need for teachers to take part in the learning, is crucial. Two 'thinking models', one concerning the PBL tutorial work and one the relationship between tutorial work and self-study, are introduced. The unifying idea behind the reasoning is to emphasise the essence of providing opportunities for, as well as stimulating, the students' inquiring approach and responsibility.

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