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  • 1.
    Bolic, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hellberg, Kristina
    Specialpedagogiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Support for learning- goes beyond academic support: voices of students with Asperger’s disorder and ADHD2016In: Autism, ISSN 1362-3613, E-ISSN 1461-7005, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 183-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to describe and explore the experiences of support at school among young adults with Asperger’s disorder (AS) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and also to examine what support they, in retrospect, described as influencing learning. Purposive sampling was used to enroll participants. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with thirteen young adults aged between 20-29 years. A qualitative analysis, based on interpreting people’s experiences was conducted by grouping and searching for patterns in data. The findings indicate that the participants experienced difficulties at school that included academic, social and emotional conditions, all of which could influence learning. Support for learning included small groups, individualized teaching methods, teachers who cared, and practical and emotional support. These clusters together confirm the overall understanding that support for learning aligns academic and psychosocial support. In conclusion, academic support combined with psychosocial support at school seems to be crucial for learning among students with AS and ADHD.

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  • 2.
    Nydén, Agneta
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Gillberg, Christopher
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Hjelmquist, Erland
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Heiman, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Attention and executive functions in children with Asperger syndrome, attention disorders and reading/writing disorder1999In: Autism, ISSN 1362-3613, E-ISSN 1461-7005, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 213-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Executive function/attention deficits were examined in children with Asperger syndrome, attention disorder and reading/ writing disorder and in a group of normal children. Neuropsychological tests as well as cognitive tasks measuring different components in the processing of information were used. The measures were divided into Mirsky’s four components of attention, namely ‘sustain’,‘focus-execute’,‘shift’ and ‘encode’. All abnormal groups differed markedly from the normal group on measures of executive function/attention. The group diagnosed as having attention disorder showed the most consistent difficulties. However, no specific marker of ‘executive function deficits’ that could represent the three different disorders was found.

  • 3.
    Salomone, Erica
    et al.
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Beranova, Stepanka
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; University Hospital Motol, Czech Republic.
    Bonnet-Brilhault, Frederique
    University of Francois Rabelais Tours, France.
    Briciet Lauritsen, Marlene
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Budisteanu, Magdalena
    Titu Maiorescu University, Romania.
    Buitelaar, Jan
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Canal-Bedia, Ricardo
    University of Salamanca, Spain.
    Felhosi, Gabriella
    Budapest and Kispest Child Mental Health Institute, Hungary.
    Fletcher-Watson, Sue
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Freitag, Christine
    Goethe University of Frankfurt, Germany.
    Fuentes, Joaquin
    Policlin Gipuzkoa, Spain.
    Gallagher, Louise
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Ireland.
    Garcia Primo, Patricia
    National Institute Health Spain IIER NIH Carlos III, Spain.
    Gliga, Fotinica
    University of Bucharest, Romania.
    Gomot, Marie
    University of Francois Rabelais Tours, France.
    Green, Jonathan
    Booth Hall Childrens Hospital, England.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Loa Jonsdottir, Sigridur
    State Diagnost and Counselling Centre, Iceland.
    Kaale, Anett
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Kawa, Rafal
    University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Kylliainen, Anneli
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Lemcke, Sanne
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Markovska-Simoska, Silvana
    Macedonian Academic Science and Arts, Macedonia.
    Marschik, Peter B.
    Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    McConachie, Helen
    Newcastle University, England.
    Moilanen, Irma
    Oulu University Hospital, Finland; University of Oulu, Finland.
    Muratori, Filippo
    IRCCS Stella Maris Fdn, Italy.
    Narzisi, Antonio
    IRCCS Stella Maris Fdn, Italy.
    Noterdaeme, Michele
    Josefinum, Germany.
    Oliveira, Guiomar
    Centre Hospital and University of Coimbra, Portugal.
    Oosterling, Iris
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Pijl, Mirjam
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Pop-Jordanova, Nada
    Macedonian Academic Science and Arts, Macedonia.
    Poustka, Luise
    Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Roeyers, Herbert
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Roge, Bernadette
    University of Toulouse Le Mirail, France.
    Sinzig, Judith
    LVR Klin Bonn, Germany.
    Vicente, Astrid
    Institute Nacl Saude Doutor Ricardo Jorge, Portugal.
    Warreyn, Petra
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Charman, Tony
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Use of early intervention for young children with autism spectrum disorder across Europe2016In: Autism, ISSN 1362-3613, E-ISSN 1461-7005, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 233-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about use of early interventions for autism spectrum disorder in Europe. Parents of children with autism spectrum disorder aged 7 years or younger (N = 1680) were recruited through parent organisations in 18 European countries and completed an online survey about the interventions their child received. There was considerable variation in use of interventions, and in some countries more than 20% of children received no intervention at all. The most frequently reported interventions were speech and language therapy (64%) and behavioural, developmental and relationship-based interventions (55%). In some parts of Europe, use of behavioural, developmental and relationship-based interventions was associated with higher parental educational level and time passed since diagnosis, rather than with child characteristics. These findings highlight the need to monitor use of intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder in Europe in order to contrast inequalities.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Tjus, Tomas
    et al.
    Psykologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nelson, Keith E
    Penn State University.
    Gains in literacy through the use of a specially developed multimedia computer strategy: Positive findings from thirteen children with autism1998In: Autism, ISSN 1362-3613, E-ISSN 1461-7005, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 139-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates the use of a specially developed multimedia program for enhancing language and reading development in children with autism. Thirteen children with autism(mean chronological age 9:8 years, mental age 7:3 years and language age 5:2 years) participated in the study. All the children used the program as a supplement to their ordinary reading and language training. A quasi-experimental design that included measures of reading and phonological awareness during baseline, treatment, and follow-up phases was used throughout. Highly significant gains were observed for both reading and phonological awareness during the treatment phase. A significant effect was also observed for phonology at follow-up, but not for reading. A response time index also revealed that reading became more rapid following intervention. It is concluded that the intervention improved reading and language development and that children with autism with various cognitive abilities might benefit from a strategy that combines a motivating multimedia program with focused and positive interactions with the teacher.

  • 5.
    Tjus, Tomas
    et al.
    Psykologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nelson, Keith E
    Penn State University.
    Interaction patterns between children and their teachers when using a specific multimedia and communication strategy: Observations from children with autism and mixed intellectual disabilities.2001In: Autism, ISSN 1362-3613, E-ISSN 1461-7005, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 175-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reports on observed interaction patterns between 20 children with autism and mixed intellectual disabilities (mean chronological age = 11:4 years; language age = 4:7 years) and their nine teachers working with a specially developed multimedia program aiming to increase literacy skills. An increase in verbal expression was found over time for the total group. Children with autism also showed increased enjoyment and willingness to seek help from their teachers. Teachers for both diagnostic groups reduced their instructions on how to handle the computer during the program but the decrease was greater in the teachers for children with autism. When the total group of children was subdivided according to language age (high versus low), it appears that those with a low language age showed an increase in verbal expressiveness from start to end of training. Those with a high language age showed increased enjoyment. It is concluded that more detailed studies of the interaction patterns between teachers and children are needed, and these should be related to children’s language level as well as to diagnostic group.

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