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  • 1.
    Andersson, Sven
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Projection systems and X-ray strategies in children's drawings: A comparative study in three cultures1999In: British Journal of Educational Psychology, ISSN 0007-0998, E-ISSN 2044-8279, Vol. 65, p. 455-464Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Working memory as a predictor of written arithmetical skills in children: The importance of central executive functions2008In: British Journal of Educational Psychology, ISSN 0007-0998, E-ISSN 2044-8279, Vol. 78, no 2, p. 181-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The study was conducted in an attempt to further our understanding of how working memory contributes to written arithmetical skills in children. Aim. The aim was to pinpoint the contribution of different central executive functions and to examine the contribution of the two subcomponents of children's written arithmetical skills. Sample and method. A total of 141 third- and fourth-graders were administered arithmetical tasks and measures of working memory, fluid IQ and reading. Regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between working memory and written arithmetical skills. Results. Three central executive measures (counting span, trail making and verbal fluency) and one phonological loop measure (Digit Span) were significant and predictors of arithmetical performance when the influence of reading, age and IQ was controlled for in the analysis. Conclusions. The present findings demonstrate that working memory, in general, and the central executive, in particular, contribute to children's arithmetical skills. It was hypothesized that monitoring and coordinating multiple processes, and accessing arithmetical knowledge from long-term memory, are important central executive functions during arithmetical performance. The contribution of the phonological loop and the central executive (concurrent processing and storage of numerical information) indicates that children aged 9-10 years primarily utilize verbal coding strategies during written arithmetical performance. © 2008 The British Psychological Society.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Skagerlund, Kenny
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Olsson, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Östergren, Rickard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Pathways to arithmetic fact retrieval and percentage calculation in adolescents2017In: British Journal of Educational Psychology, ISSN 0007-0998, E-ISSN 2044-8279, Vol. 87, no 4, p. 647-663Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Developing sufficient mathematical skills is a prerequisite to function adequately in society today. Given this, an important task is to increase our understanding regarding the cognitive mechanisms underlying young people's acquisition of early number skills and formal mathematical knowledge.

    Aims

    The purpose was to examine whether the pathways to mathematics model provides a valid account of the cognitive mechanisms underlying symbolic-number processing and mathematics in adolescents. The pathways model states that the three pathways should provide independent support to symbolic-number skill. Each pathway's unique contribution to formal mathematics varies depending on the complexity and demand of the tasks.

    Sample

    The study used a sample of 114 adolescents (71 girls). Their mean age was 14.60 years (SD = 1.00).

    Methods

    The adolescents were assessed on tests tapping the three pathways and general cognitive abilities (e.g., working memory). A structural equation path analysis was computed.

    Results

    Symbolic-number comparison was predicted by the linguistic pathway, the quantitative pathway, and processing speed. The linguistic pathway, quantitative pathways, and symbolic-number comparison predicted arithmetic fact retrieval. The linguistic pathway, working memory, visual analogies, and symbolic-number comparison predicted percentage calculation.

    Conclusions

    There are both similarities and differences in the cognitive mechanisms underlying arithmetic fact retrieval and percentage calculation in adolescents. Adolescents’ symbolic-number processing, arithmetic fact retrieval, and percentage calculation continue to rely on the linguistic pathways, whereas the reliance upon the spatial pathway has ceased. The reliance upon the quantitative pathway varies depending on the task.

  • 4.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Holmberg, I.
    Cognitive aspects of speechreading skill in hearing-impaired and normal hearing children2001In: British Journal of Educational Psychology, ISSN 0007-0998, E-ISSN 2044-8279Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Holmberg, I
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Educ & Psychol, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Visual speechreading and cognitive performance in hearing-impaired and normal hearing children (11-14 years)2000In: British Journal of Educational Psychology, ISSN 0007-0998, E-ISSN 2044-8279, Vol. 70, p. 505-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Previous research has demonstrated that parts of the variation in adults speechreading performance can be explained by the characteristics of some cognitive components. However. these results apply to populations of adults and less is known as to how results for populations of adults can be generalised to populations of children. Aim. This study aimed to examine cognitive and visual skills in a group of bilaterally, moderately hearing-impaired children and a group of normal hearing children and how these two skills relate to variability in speechreading of context-embedded sentences. Sample. Twenty-three hearing-impaired children (mean age: 12.7) and 23 normal hearing children (mean age: 12.5) matched for age, sex, verbal ability and school grades. The mean 'better ear auditory threshold for the hearing-impaired was 44.8 dB. Results. The hearing-impaired children outperformed the normal hearing children on a sentence-based speechreading task and on a visual-visual word-decoding task, but not on a word-discrimination task. Differing from the case of adults, most cognitive tasks proved to be significantly related to sentence-based speechreading performance, where working memory capacity and visual word-decoding: skill proved to be the strongest predictors. Conclusions. Speechreading is more cognitively demanding for children than for adults as they have not developed their cognitive abilities to the same extent as adults. Thus, they have to devote more processing capacity, relative to their total cognitive processing capacity, to the speechreading task. Skilled visual word-decoding and cognitive skills, together with everyday exposure to situations where speechreading is required. are some of the candidates for explanation of the hearing-impaired children's superior speechreading skill.

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