liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Cederborg, A-C
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Hultman, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Living with children who have coeliac disease: a parental perspective2012In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 484-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background This study explores how a childs coeliac disease (CD) influences the daily life of families because such knowledge can enhance the understanding of how to support family adjustment to a gluten-free diet (GFD). Methods We used an interpretative phenomenological approach, interviewing 20 parents of 14 children diagnosed with CD about their individual thoughts and beliefs. Results Once parents know, especially when their children are young, they seem to have the capacity to rapidly adapt to GFD, mainly because they notice how quickly their children recover. Parents may have problems controlling how staff at daycare and at school complies with their information about a GFD. Conclusions To ensure that children with CD are given a GFD at daycare and school, it is necessary for municipalities to educate staff about the disease and to give them the prerequisites for serving a GFD. There is also a need of early identification of children who may have CD. When parents express their worries, not just at the hospital but also at the well-baby clinic and primary care units, supporting treatment could prevent children from suffering from inappropriate food.

  • 2.
    Hallin, A-L
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund.
    Bengtsson, H
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund.
    Sepa Frostell, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stjernqvist, K
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund.
    The effect of extremely preterm birth on attachment organization in late adolescence2012In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 196-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Prior studies have examined the impact of preterm birth on the quality of the attachment relationship to the mother in infancy, but few have examined extremely preterm born infants and almost no data have been reported on prematurity and its impact on the attachment organization attained after childhood. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods Thirty-nine adolescents born extremely preterm and 39 full-term born control participants were assessed with the Adult Attachment Interview. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults The prematurely born showed lower scores regarding measures of attachment security and, in particular, a higher proportion of insecure dismissive patterns. This difference seemed to be clear and persistent even when controlled for intelligence and socio-economic variables. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions Because insecure attachment as well as prematurity may be considered as significant risk factors for developing psychopathology, they deserve careful attention in future research and clinical follow-ups.

  • 3.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Borell, Lena
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Environmental barriers in mainstream schools2002In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 57-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on students with disabilities in mainstream schools often focuses on the students' personal abilities rather than on the establishment itself. To promote inclusive education, the environmental prerequisite for participation has to be explored also. The aim of this study was to identify the barriers to participation in Swedish mainstream schools, from the personal perspective of students with physical disabilities. The study also investigated how gender, diagnosis, level of mobility, academic years and availability of an assistant were related to student-environment fit. A total of 34 students with physical disabilities, aged between 10 and 19 years, participated in the study. The students were assessed by 'The school-setting interview'. Results show that two-thirds of the students experienced barriers to participation in both the physical and the social environment. A majority of the barriers originated from the way in which school activities were organized and carried out in schools. Failure to provide adequate environmental adjustments resulted in restricted participation or exclusion from some of the activities in class. Older students experienced significantly more barriers than younger ones because the school organization was less favourable. The results suggest that the way in which activities are organized in school is the area in need of most improvements to promote participation of students with physical disabilities.

  • 4.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Stenhammar, A.M.
    Halmstad University.
    Paulsson, K.
    Stocholm University.
    Sleep problems and the need for parental night-time attention in children with physical disabilities2009In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 89-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background  The aim of the study was to investigate the frequency and predictors of sleep problems and the need for parental night-time attention in children with physical disabilities.

    Methods  A questionnaire on sleep problems and need for parental night-time attention was completed by 505 parents of children with physical disabilities aged 1–16 years (mean 9 years 3 months) with moderate to severe motor disabilities. General characteristics of the children were analysed by frequencies and cross-tabulations. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with sleep problems and the need for parental night-time attention.

    Results  The results showed a high prevalence of sleep problems, which in general were chronic. Currently 48% of the children had sleep problems, of which 23% estimated the problems to be serious. About one-third (37%) needed parental night-time attention every night, and 10% needed help five times or more. No significant differences were found between younger children and school-aged children regarding sleep problems and the need for parental night-time attention. Having pain [odds ratio (OR) = 3.4] was associated with sleep problems, as was having problems eating and drinking (OR = 3) and the diagnosis of cerebral palsy (OR = 2.5) (P < 0.05). Children with muscular dystrophy (OR = 68.5), cerebral palsy (OR = 26.7) and ‘other diagnosis’ (OR = 18.5) were more likely to need support at night than were children with spina bifida, P < 0.001. Pain (OR = 7.6) was also associated with need for support at night, P < 0.001.

    Conclusions  The prevalence of sleep problems and need for parental night-time attention is high among children with physical disabilities. This in turn affects the whole family, and paediatric caregivers must keep this in mind. Besides certain diagnoses, the results suggest that children who have pain should be prioritized.

  • 5.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Parents of children with physical disabilities - perceived health in parents related to the child's sleep problems and need for attention at night2014In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 412-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Approximately half of all children with moderate to severe physical disabilities have persistent sleep problems and many of these children need parental attention at night.

    AIM:

    To study whether sleep problems and need for night-time attention among children with physical disabilities are associated with perceived parental health, headache, psychological exhaustion, pain due to heavy lifting, night-time wakefulness and disrupted sleep.

    METHODS:

    We asked parents of 377 children with physical disabilities aged 1-16 years to complete a questionnaire about their own health. The children all lived at home with both parents.

    RESULTS:

    Both parents reported poor health, psychological exhaustion, more night-time wakefulness and disrupted sleep when the child had sleep problems (P < 0.05). Mothers also reported more headache when the child had sleep problems (P = 0.001). Both parents reported more night-time wakefulness and disrupted sleep when the child needed night-time attention (P < 0.01). In general, mothers reported significantly poorer health, more night-time wakefulness, disrupted sleep, headache and psychological exhaustion than fathers (P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Sleep problems need to be acknowledged within the paediatric setting in order to prevent psychological exhaustion and poor health in mothers and fathers of children with physical disabilities.

     

  • 6.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nelson, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Per A
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Salivary cortisol response in mother-infant dyads at psychosocial high-risk2006In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 128-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the adrenocortical response to diaper change in mother–infant dyads with psychosocial risk factors.

    Material and methods Twenty-two mother–infant pairs with well-defined psychosocial problems were included. The mother–infant pairs were treated for 6 weeks in a daycare programme to improve attachment. Salivary cortisol was measured before and after a diaper change during the first and last weeks of enrolment in the programme. Mothers' sensitivity towards their infants' signals was measured using a scale from 1 (highly insensitive) to 9 (highly sensitive) according to Ainsworth.

    Results Median salivary cortisol increased in 15 out of 22 infants after the first diaper change. The increase was most pronounced in the group of infants below 3 months of age (n = 15) where median salivary cortisol increased 170% after the first diaper change (P < 0.05) and decreased 19% after the last diaper change (not significant). Out of these 15 infants, 11 showed an increase in salivary cortisol in response to the first diaper change while four out of 15 did so in response to the last diaper change (P < 0.05). The salivary cortisol response did not change over time in infants aged 3 months or above. A mother's sensitivity to her child increased significantly (P < 0.001) from the first to the last week. In mothers, median salivary cortisol decreased 38% after the first diaper change (P < 0.05) and 57% after the last diaper change (P = 0.001).

    Discussion A diaper change is normally not perceived as stressful. The stress response caused by a diaper change may illustrate an insufficiency in the mother–infant relationship before treatment. Professional support improved the mothers' sensitivity and stabilized the stress response to diaper change in the youngest infants.

  • 7.
    Proczkowska-Björklund, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Runeson, I.
    Department of Health and Behaviour Sciences, University of Kalmar, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Decision making about pre-medication to children.2008In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 713-720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Inviting the child to participate in medical decisions regarding common medical procedures might influence the child's behaviour during the procedures. We wanted to study nurse decision-making communication regarding pre-medication before ear, nose and throat (ENT) surgery.

    Method: In total, 102 children (3-6 years) signed for ENT surgery were video-filmed during the pre-medication process. The nurse decision-making communication was identified, transcribed and grouped in six main categories dependent on the level of participation (self-determination, compromise, negotiation, questioning, information, lack of communication). Associations between child factors (age, gender, verbal communication and non-verbal communication) and different nurse decision-making communication were studied. Associations between the decision-making communication and verbal hesitation and/or the child's compliance in taking pre-medication were also studied.

    Results: Totally, information was the most frequently used category of decision making communication followed by negotiation and questioning. To the children showing signs of shyness, the nurse used more negotiation, questions and self-determination communication and less information. The nurse used more compromise, negotiation and gave less information to children with less compliance. No specific type of nurse decision-making communication was associated with verbal hesitation. The most important predictors for verbal hesitation were none or hesitant eye contact with nurse (OR = 4.5) and placement nearby or in parent's lap (OR = 4.7). Predictors for less compliance in taking pre-medication were verbal hesitation from the child (OR = 22.7) and children who did not give any verbal answer to nurse initial questions (OR = 5.5).

    Conclusion: Decision-making communication could not predict the child's compliance during pre-medication. Although negotiation, questioning and self-determination communication were associated with more unwillingness to take pre-medication. More knowledge is needed about communication to children in medical settings and how it influences the child's behaviours.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf