liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Grimlund, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Predicting treatment outcome in Internet versus face to face treatment of panic disorder2008In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 1790-1801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the advent of guided self-help via the Internet it has become increasingly important to investigate predictors of treatment outcome. The present study analyzed predictors of outcome using data from a randomized controlled trial on panic disorder [Carlbring, P. et al. (2005). Treatment of panic disorder: Live therapy versus self-help via Internet. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 43, 1321-1333]. Half of the sample received therapist guided Internet treatment (N = 25) and the other half face to face treatment (N = 24) in individual sessions during a 10-week study period. Results showed that agoraphobic avoidance was predictive of outcome in the face to face treatment, but not in the Internet treatment. A self-report screening of personality disorder (anxious cluster) was associated with worse outcome for the Internet treatment, but surprisingly associated with better outcome in face to face treatment. Cognitive capacity as measured by a test of verbal fluency was not predictive of outcome in the Internet group, and neither was a rating of treatment credibility. Overall, we conclude that in relation to face to face treatment different predictors of outcome should be investigated for Internet treatment. Internet treatment might be more suitable for certain clients who might benefit from remote treatment in the early phase of treatment.

  • 2.
    Carlbring, P.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, SE-751 42 Uppsala, PO Box 1225, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Internet and psychological treatment. How well can they be combined?2006In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 545-553Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As evidenced by several trials, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is a highly effective treatment for many conditions including panic disorder with or without agoraphobia. However, therapists are short in supply, and patients with conditions like agoraphobia may not seek therapy due to fear of leaving their homes or traveling certain distances. A major challenge therefore is to increase the accessibility and affordability of empirically supported psychological treatments. The results of randomized controlled trails testing Internet delivered self-help programs generally provide evidence to support the continued use and development for a range of conditions. However, there are special treatment aspects that need to be taken into consideration such as internet access and the idiosyncrasies provided in traditional face to face therapies. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Björnstjerna, Eva
    Uppsala University.
    Norkrans, Anna
    Uppsala University.
    Waara, Johan
    Uppsala University.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Uppsala University.
    Applied Relaxation: an experimental analog study of therapist vs. computer administration2007In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 2-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This experimental analog component study compared two ways of administrating relaxation, either via a computer or by a therapist. The second phase of applied relaxation was used, which is called “release-only relaxation”. Sixty participants from a student population were randomized to one of three groups: computer-administered relaxation, therapist-administered relaxation, or a control group in which participants surfed on the Internet. Outcome was measures using psychophysiological responses and self-report. Objective psychophysiological data and results on the subjective visual analogue scale suggest that there was no difference between the two forms of administration. Both experimental groups became significantly more relaxed than the control group that surfed on the Internet. Practical applications and future directions are discussed.

  • 4.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Brung, Sara
    Bohman, Susanne
    Austin, David
    Richards, Jeff
    Öst, Lars-Göran
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Internet vs. paper and pencil administration of questionnaires commonly used in panic/agoraphobia research2007In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 1421-1434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of Internet administered questionnaires used in panic research. Included were 494 people who had registered for an Internet-based treatment program for panic disorder (PD). Participants were randomly assigned to fill in the questionnaires either on the Internet or the paper-and-pencil versions, and then to fill in the same questionnaires again the next day using the other format. The questionnaires were the body sensations questionnaire [BSQ, Chambless, D. L., Caputo, G. C., Bright, P., & Gallagher, R. (1984). Assessment of fear of fear in agoraphobics: the body sensations questionnaire and the agoraphobic cognitions questionnaire. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 52, 1090-1097], agoraphobic cognitions questionnaire [ACQ, Chambless, D. L., Caputo, G. C., Bright, P., & Gallagher, R. (1984). Assessment of fear of fear in agoraphobics: the body sensations questionnaire and the agoraphobic cognitions questionnaire. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 52, 1090-1097], mobility inventory [MI, Chambless, D. L., Caputo, G., Jasin, S., Gracely, E. J., & Williams, C. (1985). The mobility inventory for agoraphobia. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 23, 35-44], beck anxiety inventory [BAI, Beck, A. T., Epstein, N., Brown, G., & Steer, R. A. (1988). An inventory for measuring clinical anxiety: psychometric properties. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 56, 893-897], beck depression inventory II [Beck, A. T., & Steer, R. A. (1996). Beck Depression Inventory. Manual, Svensk version (Swedish version). Fagernes, Norway: Psykologiförlaget, AB], quality of life inventory [QOLI, Frisch, M. B., Cornell, J., Villanueva, M., & Retzlaff, P. J. (1992). Clinical validation of the quality of life inventory. A measure of life satisfaction for use in treatment planning and outcome assessment. Psychological Assessment, 4, 92-101], and montgomery Åsberg depression rating scale [MADRS, Svanborg, P., & Åsberg, M. (1994). A new self-rating scale for depression and anxiety states based on the comprehensive psychopathological rating scale. ACTA Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 89, 21-28]. Results showed largely equivalent psychometric properties for the two administration formats (Cronbach's α between 0.79 and 0.95). The results also showed high and significant correlations between the Internet and the paper-and-pencil versions. Analyses of order effects showed an interaction effect for the BSQ and the MI (subscale Accompanied), a main effect was identified for ACQ, MI-Alone, BAI and BDI II. However, in contrast to previous research, the Internet version did not consistently generate higher scores and effect sizes for the differences were generally low. Given the presence of an interaction effect, we recommend that the administration format should be stable in research across measurement points. Finally, the findings suggest that Internet versions of questionnaires used in PD research can be used with confidence. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Cooper, Karen
    et al.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Quayle, Ethel
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Jonsson, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Adolescents and self-taken sexual images: A review of the literature2016In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 55, no part B, p. 706-716Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite increasing public interest and concern about young peoples involvement in the self-production of sexual images (or sexting), there remains a dearth of research into their reasons for making and sending images, the processes involved, and the consequences arising from their experiences. This article reviews the motivational, lifestyle and personality factors influencing adolescent sexting practices and explores the research evidence within the wider context of debates around contemporary social and visual media cultures and gender. A systematic search of databases was conducted and eighty-eight records were identified for inclusion in the review. The findings reveal that sexting is remarkably varied in terms of context, meaning and intention, with the potential for consensual and non-consensual aspects of the activity. Whilst sexting can be a means of flirting or enhancing a sexual relationship, it can highlight potential vulnerabilities to victimisation or to participation in risky sexual practices. Sexting is also inextricably linked to social expectations of gendered sexual behaviours, with females often deriving less satisfaction from their experiences and being perceived more negatively by their peers. Further research linking adolescent motivations, well-being, relationships and lifestyles with the broader socio-cultural and media landscape will ultimately help drive understanding about the subject forward. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Jonsson, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Priebe, Gisela
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics UHL.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Voluntary sexual exposure online among Swedish youth - social background, Internet behavior and psychosocial health2014In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 30, p. 181-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies have described the phenomenon of voluntary sexual exposure among youth online but only a few focus on the typical young person who has this experience. The purpose of this study was to investigate Swedish youth with experience of voluntary sexual exposure online, with regard to Internet behavior, social background, and psychosocial health including parent-child relationships. A representative sample of 3503 Swedish youths in their third year of high school completed a survey about Internet behavior, Internet-related sexual harassment, sexuality, health, and sexual abuse. Out of those taking part in the survey, 20.9% (19.2% boys and 22.3% girls) reported experiences of voluntary sexual exposure online. Multivariate analysis showed a significant association between voluntary sexual exposure online and a number of different forms of harassment online. Neither poorer psychosocial health nor problematic relationships with parents remained significant in the final model. The results underlined the fact that voluntary sexual exposure online is associated with vulnerability on the Internet among both boys and girls and that there is a need for parents and professionals to better understand what young people do on the Internet and the risks they may incur.

  • 7.
    Linnman, Clas
    et al.
    Institutionen för Psykologi Uppsala universitet.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Åhman, Åsa
    Department of Psychology Uppsala university.
    Andersson, Håkan
    aDepartment of Psychology Uppsala university.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    The Stroop effect on the internet2006In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 448-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The classical Stroop color-naming task was converted to a Web administered version and tested against a conventional computerized version. In the first experiment, 20 male and 20 female participants were tested individually on both Stroop versions in random order. Both versions resulted in strong Stroop effects, but response times were slower overall for the Web-Stroop. A second experiment with 28 participants showed that the test results on the Web-Stroop could be replicated in a less controlled experimental setting, for example in the participant's own home. In conclusion, findings suggest that administration of the Stroop color-naming test, and response time measurement in milliseconds on a personal computer, is possible via the Internet. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Rosander, Michael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Eriksson, Oskar
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Conformity on the Internet – The role of task difficulty and gender differences2012In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 1587-1595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conformity and the effects of social influence have been studied for a long time in face-to-face situations but have received less attention in contexts of computer-mediated communication (CMC) such as the Internet. The purpose of this study was to investigate conformity behavior in use of the Internet. The social context for the participants was the Internet communities from which they were recruited. Four hypotheses were tested by a survey containing knowledge and logic questions. Half the participants were subjected to conformity manipulations and the result showed a clear conformity to erroneous majority alternatives. Of the participants in the Conformity group (n = 477) 52.6% conformed at least once, with an average 13.0% of participants conforming on each critical question. The conformity increased with higher task difficulty, both subjective and objective. The fourth hypothesis, that women would conform to a higher degree than men, received no support. Instead, the results showed higher conformity for men on both difficult and logical questions. Reasons for conformity on the Internet such as turning to the group for guidance, avoiding social isolation and protecting one’s self-esteem are discussed with reference to theory and earlier research.

  • 9.
    Thorndike, Frances P
    et al.
    University of Virginia.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Smyth, Frederick L
    University of Virginia.
    Magee, Joshua C
    University of Virginia.
    Gonder-Frederick, Linda
    University of Virginia.
    Ost, Lars-Goran
    Stockholm University.
    Ritterband , Lee M
    University of Virginia.
    Web-based measurement: Effect of completing single or multiple items per webpage2009In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 393-401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study was conducted to determine whether participants respond differently to online questionnaires presenting all items on a single webpage versus questionnaires presenting only one item per page, and whether participants prefer one format over the other. Of participants seeking self-help treatment on the Internet (for depression, social phobia, or panic disorder), 710 completed four questionnaires (Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Quality of Life Index, Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale) on the Internet on two occasions. The questionnaires were either presented with one questionnaire on one webpage (e.g., BDI on one webpage) or on multiple webpages (e.g., BDI on 21 webpages with one item each). Results suggest that the four web questionnaires measure the same construct across diagnostic group (depression, social phobia, panic), presentation type (single versus multiple items per page), and order of presentation (which format first). Within each diagnostic group, factor means for all questionnaires were equivalent across presentation method and time. Furthermore. factor means varied as expected across samples (e.g.. depressed group scored higher on BDI), providing evidence of construct validity. The majority of participants in each diagnostic group preferred the single item per page format, even though this format required more time.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf