liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Developmental Psychology.
    Coming of age. Perspective setting in multi-pary problem formulations.1996In: Discourse processes, ISSN 0163-853X, E-ISSN 1532-6950, Vol. 21, p. 191-212Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pro-forms as projective devices in interaction2011In: Discourse processes, ISSN 0163-853X, E-ISSN 1532-6950, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 404-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cataphoric pronouns have been characterized as being co-referential with a word that comes later. Considering that talk is produced in real time, with little benefit of knowing what is yet to come, participants understand cataphoric pro-forms to be projecting more talk. Projection is a crucial interactive resource, as it enables speakers to align with the ongoing talk and to initiate subsequent contributions in a timely manner. The study looks at how Estonian pro-forms are systematically used to project either a word (phrase) or a clause in interaction. The patterns discussed are not universal and it will be suggested that projecting word (phrases) with pro-forms is a characteristic of a nonprepositional language with no articles, and that pro-form projection can be especially useful in a free word order language. As many pro-forms do not end up with a co-referential word, projection provides a better account of their function. The article underlines the necessity of studying grammar as a temporal phenomenon.

  • 3.
    Korolija, Natascha
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Recycling Cotext: The Impact of Prior Conversation on the Emergence of Episodes in a Multiparty Radio Talk Show1998In: Discourse processes, ISSN 0163-853X, E-ISSN 1532-6950, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 99-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores cotext as a topical resource through analysis of a multiparty radio talk show. This article aims at an examination of the cotextual dimensions from which interlocutors proceed when they initiate new conversational episodes. The notion of recontextualization is defined. Recontextualizations build on 4 types of cotextual links involving (a) expressions, forms, and discursive acts, (b) meaning and reference of word tokens, (c) propositions, and (d) leitmotifs. The study shows that cotext is not simply the totality of preceding utterances in a conversation, and it is not a static local microcontext. Rather, relevant cotexts are constructed as actors create or identify cotextual links. These links indicate what actors recycle and also what they keep active in their streams of consciousness. Recycling cotext is an efficient strategy for generating new episodes, thus making conversation progress. It is a strategy central for coherence within the frames of the particular genres or activity types, such as radio talk shows, and also of importance for coherence construction in more ordinary genres.

  • 4.
    St. John, Oliver
    et al.
    Örebro Universitet, Sverige.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Crafting instructions collaboratively: Student questions and dual addressivity in classroom task instructions2016In: Discourse processes, ISSN 0163-853X, E-ISSN 1532-6950, ISSN 0163-853X, Vol. 53, p. 252-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines classroom task instructions—phases traditionally associatedwith noninteractional objectives and operations—and reveals their compositionas interactionally complex and cocrafted. Analyses of video sequences of taskinstructional activity from three different secondary school lessons show thatstudent questions routinely contribute to making task instructions followable. In thisenvironment, student questions set up tensions between the demand to respond tothe individual and responsibility to uphold the general instructional agenda. Datashow that, as addressees of student questions, instructors take great care to meetboth individual and collective accountabilities. To meet obligation to the addresseeand exploit the instructional benefit of the question for the cohort, dualaddressivity—targeting two or more addressees in response to a student question—proves a crucial method for achieving such principled practice. Educationally, itappears vital to recognize student instructed action as integral to task-relatedlearning.

  • 5.
    Tholander, Michael
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cross-gender teasing as a socializing practice2002In: Discourse processes, ISSN 0163-853X, E-ISSN 1532-6950, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 311-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many studies of teasing between boys and girls, researchers have concluded that teasing affirms boundaries and asymmetries between the sexes through so-called borderwork (Thorne, 1993). However, in this study of teasing during student-run group work, teasing was shown to reach far beyond mere cultural reproduction of gender differences. Not only did teasing sometimes seem to contribute to tearing down traditional gender roles, but it was also employed for many other practical purposes. The study adopts a dialogical perspective on gender socialization to illustrate the fine details of how boys and girls orient to gender in teasing practices. However, quantitative analyses also show that gender is oriented to on an aggregate level: cross-gender teasing is far more common than same-gender teasing. This finding supports van Dijk's (1999) hypothesis that gender is a systematic relevance category.

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf