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  • 1. Ekstam, B
    et al.
    Johannesson, R
    Milberg, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology .
    The effect of light and number of diurnal temperature fluctuations on germination of Phragmites australis1999In: Seed Science Research, ISSN 0960-2585, E-ISSN 1475-2735, Vol. 9, p. 165-170Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Karlsson, Laila
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tamado, T.
    Haramaya University.
    Milberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inter-species comparison of seed dormancy and germination of six annual Asteraceae weeds in an ecological context2008In: Seed Science Research, ISSN 0960-2585, E-ISSN 1475-2735, Vol. 18, p. 35-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To understand germination timing in an ecological context, the response to environmental events that affect seed dormancy is central, and has to be combined with knowledge of germination responses to different circumstances. In this study, seed dormancy, germination, and emergence phenology of six annual co-occurring weedy Asteraceae species were investigated. Three pre-treatments (warm and cold stratification, and dry storage) were tested as possible dormancy affecting environmental events. Seeds were also sown outdoors. Species-specific differences were revealed in analyses. To facilitate general descriptions of dormancy patterns and germination preferences separately, condensed responses to the different possible dormancy affecting treatments and relative germination in different environments were plotted, giving species-specific patterns. Most species exhibited decreased dormancy to two or three pre-treatments. Dormancy was most effectively reduced by cold stratification for three species (Guizotia scabra, Parthenium hysterophorus, Verbesina encelioides), by warm stratification for two (Bidens pilosa, Galinsoga parviflora) and by dry storage for one (Tagetes minuta). All species germinated more when provided with light than in continuous darkness. Temperature levels most suitable for germination varied from low (15/5-20/10°C) for Verbesina encelioides to high (25/15-30/20°C) for Bidens pilosa. It is concluded that, even though the species have different dormancy patterns and germination preferences that suggest different possible distribution ranges, the species achieve similar emergence timing in the field in environments with a pronounced dry period after dispersal and small annual temperature fluctuations.

  • 3.
    Leijon, Matti W.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular genetics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hagenblad, Jenny
    Uppsala University.
    Edqvist, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular genetics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson Strese, Else-Marie
    Swedish Museum of Cultural History.
    DNA preservation and utility of a historic seed collection2009In: Seed Science Research, ISSN 0960-2585, E-ISSN 1475-2735, Vol. 19, p. 125-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Historic collections of biological material are important genetic resources for taxonomic, evolutionary and historical research. In this paper we describe a seed collection dating from 1862 to 1918 maintained at the Swedish Museum of Cultural History. The collection contains over 3000 well-documented seed samples of various agricultural crops, mostly cereals. A subset of 100 samples divided over ten species frequently represented in the collection and a range of ages were tested for germinability and DNA preservation. None of these accessions were found to contain viable seeds. DNA extracted from the seeds was degraded, but the amount of degradation varied between species. DNA quality was evaluated by yield, fragment size and size of amplification product. Quality was highest for DNA extracted from Pisum sativum and Vicia sativa. DNA extracted from Brassica napus, Beta vulgaris and Trifolium pratense was more fragmented, and DNA extracted from Triticum aestivum, Secale sereale, Hordeum vulgare, Avena sativa and Phleum pratense was most degraded. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of ribosomal DNA fragments of up to 700 bp was permitted for most samples in all species. To test whether single-copy nuclear genes could be amplified from the extracted DNA, microsatellite markers were used on the Pisum sativum and Hordeum vulgare samples. Polymorphisms of microsatellite markers were detected between samples for both species. The results show that the 19th-century seed collection can be utilized to infer genetic relationships among obsolete cultivars as well as for other types of genetic research based on sequence or marker analysis.

  • 4.
    Milberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology .
    Andersson, L
    Thompson, K
    Large-seeded species are less dependent on light for germination than small-seeded ones2000In: Seed Science Research, ISSN 0960-2585, E-ISSN 1475-2735, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 99-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Germination in light and darkness was compared after cold stratification of seeds of 54 species known or suspected to accumulate persistent seed banks. Germination became less dependent on light with increasing seed mass. This pattern was clear in a direct correlation of individual species data (P <0.0001) as well as when considering phylogenetically independent contrasts (P <0.001). The latter analysis suggests that light response and seed mass coevolved.

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