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  • 1.
    Heimann, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Laberg, Kari E
    Eikelund kompetansesenter, Bergen, Norway.
    Nordøen, Bodil
    Eikelund kompetansesenter, Bergen, Norway.
    Imitative interaction increases social interest and elicited imitation in non-verbal children with autism2006In: Infant and Child Development, ISSN 1522-7227, E-ISSN 1522-7219, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 297-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies indicate that being intensely imitated for a brief period of time increases social interest among children with autism. The aim of this study was to replicate and extend these findings. Twenty children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were randomly assigned to one of two interaction strategies: imitation (n = 10) or contingent (n = 10). The children had little or no functional speech, and their developmental age averaged 25 months (mean chronological age =6:5 years). Both conditions were presented with repeated sessions of a modified version of Nadel's 'still-face' paradigm (still-face/intervention/ still-face/spontaneous play). The analysis revealed a significant increase of both proximal and distal social behaviours (touch and look at person) for the imitation condition, which confirms previous reports. In addition, an increase in elicited imitaticr., as measured with the PEP-R developmental assessment procedure, was also observed for children in the imitation condition, but not in the contingent condition. This finding extends earlier reports in that it suggests that the social expectancies unlocked by imitation also spread to tasks outside the experimental setting. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 2.
    Heimann, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Strid, Karin
    Psykologiska institutionen Göteborgs universitet.
    Smith, Lars
    Psykologisk institutt Universitetet i Oslo.
    Tjus, Tomas
    Psykologiska institutionen Göteborgs universitet.
    Ulvund, Stein Erik
    Institutt for spesialpedagogikk Universitetet i Oslo.
    Meltzoff, Andrew N
    Dept. of Psychology University of Washington, USA.
    Exploring the relation between memory, gestural communication, and the emergence of language in infancy: A longitudinal study2006In: Infant and Child Development, ISSN 1522-7227, E-ISSN 1522-7219, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 233-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between recall memory, visual recognition memory, social communication, and the emergence of language skills was measured in a longitudinal study. Thirty typically developing Swedish children were tested at 6, 9 and 14 months. The result showed that, in combination, visual recognition memory at 6 months, deferred imitation at 9 months and turn-taking skills at 14 months could explain 41% of the variance in the infants' production of communicative gestures as measured by a Swedish variant of the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventories (CDI). In this statistical model, deferred imitation stood out as the strongest predictor. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 3.
    Nyberg, Lilianne
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Psychol, SE-75142 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Henricsson, Lisbeth
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Rydell, Ann-Margret
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Psychol, SE-75142 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Low Social Inclusion in Childhood: Adjustment and Early Predictors2008In: Infant and Child Development, ISSN 1522-7227, E-ISSN 1522-7219, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 639-656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The principal aim of the present study was to obtain a deeper understanding than hitherto of the concurrent correlates and prospective predictors of loneliness and poor peer acceptance, both falling under the umbrella term low social inclusion. Problematic and socially competent behaviours were investigated as possible predictors of low social inclusion in grade 6, as defined by self-rated loneliness and degree of peer non-acceptance, respectively. In grade 6 808 children participated whereof 323 were followed longitudinally from first grade. Loneliness in grade 6 was distinctively associated with high levels of internalizing problems, concurrently as well as prospectively. Peer acceptance, on the other hand, emerged as a complex, multifaceted aspect, with concurrent, independent predictions from both externalizing and internalizing problem behaviours as well as social competence, although prospective analyses found early externalizing problems to be the strongest predictor of peer acceptance. Moderating effects of social competence were sparse, although peer nominated social competence buffered peer acceptance for children with high levels of aggression in the concurrent analyses and social competence boosted peer acceptance for children with low problem levels in the predictive analyses. Social competence did not appear to buffer the negative impact of early problem behaviours on peer relations.

  • 4.
    Sundqvist, Anett
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Holmer, Emil
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Koch, Felix-Sebastian
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Developing theory of mind abilities in Swedish pre-schoolers2018In: Infant and Child Development, ISSN 1522-7227, E-ISSN 1522-7219, Vol. 27, no 4, article id e2090Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the development of theory of mind (ToM) in 80 Swedish-speaking 3- to 5-year-olds, a previously unstudied language and culture. The ToM scale was translated and tested in a Swedish context. The results show that the ToM abilities improve significantly with age. In addition, a gender difference was observed for the whole sample, girls outperformed boys, but follow-up analyses revealed that the difference only remained significant for the 4-year-olds. No gender differences were observed at 3 and 5years of age. When conducting a scalability analysis, the overall Wellman and Liu scale showed less than acceptable scalability. However, when removing the last task of the scale (Real-Apparent Emotion), the fit and scalability was good. The reason for this divergent result is discussed in terms of cultural differences, such as parental and pedagogical practices in Sweden, which might especially focus on developing childrens socio-emotional understanding. Highlights Is the theory of mind (ToM) scale a feasible method to assess preschool-aged children in a Swedish context? The scale shows significant development from 3 to 5 years of age. To achieve a good scalability, the final task of the scale was removed. The scale measures ToM abilities developing in preschoolers. Cultural differences, such as parental and pedagogical practices, may alter the developmental trajectory of ToM abilities.

  • 5.
    Zeedyk, M Suzanne
    et al.
    Dept of psychology Univ of Dundee, Scotland.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Imitation and socio-emotional processes2006In: Infant and Child Development, ISSN 1522-7227, E-ISSN 1522-7219, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 219-221Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Zeedyk, Suzanne M
    et al.
    University of Dundee, UK.
    Heimann, Mikael
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Imitation and socio-emotional processes: Implications for communicative development and interventions2006In: Infant and Child Development, ISSN 1522-7227, E-ISSN 1522-7219, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 219-222Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 6 of 6
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