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  • 1.
    Gren-Landell, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Aho, Nikolas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Social anxiety disorder and victimization in a community sample of adolescents2011In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 569-577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite high prevalence rates of social anxiety disorder (SAD) and high rates of victimization in adolescents, studies on the relationship between these phenomena are missing. In the present study we report associations between SAD and multiple victimization experiences in a community sample of adolescents. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 3211 Swedish high-school students. The prevalence rate of self-reported SAD was 10.6% (n=340). Significantly higher rates of lifetime victimization was found in subjects with self-reported SAD compared to non-cases, on the total score on the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire, and on the subscales maltreatment, sexual victimization and victimization from peer/siblings. Different results emerged due to gender. In females, maltreatment and sexual victimization was associated with an increased risk of SAD and, in males sexual victimization increased the risk of reporting SAD. Further studies are needed to elaborate developmental models on SAD and to add to modification of prevention- and treatment interventions.

  • 2.
    Jungert, Tomas
    et al.
    Lunds universitet, Sweden.
    Piroddi, Barbara
    Università degli Studi di Torino, Italy.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Early adolescents' motivations to defend victims in school bullying and their perceptions of student–teacher relationships: A self-determination theory approach2016In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 53, p. 75-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether various dimensions of student–teacher relationships were associated with different types of motivation to defend victims in bullying and to determine the association between these types of motivations and various bystander behaviors in bullying situations among early adolescents in Italy. Data were collected from 405 Italian adolescents who completed a survey in their classroom. Results showed that warm student–teacher relationships were positively associated with defending victims and autonomous motivation to defend victims. In contrast, conflictual student–teacher relationships were positively associated with passive bystanding and with extrinsic motivation to defend. Different forms of motivation to defend were found to be mediators between student–teacher relationship qualities and bystander behaviors in school bullying. Our findings suggest that teachers should build warm and caring student–teacher relationships to enhance students’ autonomous motivation to defend victims of bullying as well as their inclination to defend the victims in practice.

  • 3.
    Kimber, Birgitta
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Social Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandell, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Prevention of substance use among adolescents through social and emotional training in school: A latent-class analysis of a five-year intervention in Sweden2009In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 1403-1413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study considers the impact of a program for social and emotional learning in Swedish schools on use of drugs, volatile substances, alcohol and tobacco. The program was evaluated in an effectiveness study. Intervention Students were compared longitudinally with non-intervention students using nonparametric latent class analysis to identify subgroups of students with similar use levels and trajectories. Statistically significant intervention-by-duration interactions, with medium to large effect sizes to the advantage of the SET students were found for all Substances in one or more, but not all, of the latent classes. Favorable trajectories were found for non-users/light users of drugs, moderate sniffers, non-users/light users of alcohol, and occasional smokers. Only among heavy smokers was there a possible iatrogenic effect of SET. Such programs, given a duration of two years or more, may dampen increases in use with age and discourage early debut, although they are not specifically targeted at use itself.

  • 4. Lena, Adamson
    et al.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Self-concept and questions of life: Identity development during late adolescence1996In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 19, p. 569-582Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Pozzoli, Tiziana
    et al.
    University of Padua, Italy.
    Gini, Gianluca
    University of Padua, Italy.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Getting angry matters: Going beyond perspective taking and empathic concern to understand bystanders' behavior in bullying2017In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 61, p. 87-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined the relations between different empathic dimensions and bystanders' behavior in bullying. Specifically, the indirect effects of empathic concern and perspective taking via empathic anger on defending and passive bystanding were tested in a sample of Italian young adolescents (N = 398; Mage = 12 years, 3 months, 47.2% girls). Path analysis confirmed the direct and indirect effects, via empathic anger, of empathic concern and perspective taking on bystanders' behavior, with the exception of the direct association between perspective taking and passive bystanding that was not significant. Our findings suggest that considering empathic anger together with empathic concern and perspective taking could help researchers to better understand the links between empathic dispositions and bystanders' behavior in bullying.

  • 6.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerman, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Priebe, Gisela
    Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund.
    Frequent users of pornography. A population based epidemiological study of Swedish male adolescents2011In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 779-788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Frequent use of pornography has not been sufficiently studied before. In a Swedish survey 2015 male students aged 18 years participated. A group of frequent users of pornography (N = 200, 10.5%) were studied with respect to background and psychosocial correlates. The frequent users had a more positive attitude to pornography, were more often "turned on" viewing pornography and viewed more often advanced forms of pornography. Frequent use was also associated with many problem behaviours. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that frequent users of pornography were more likely to be living in a large city, consuming alcohol more often, having greater sexual desire and had more often sold sex than other boys of the same age. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanHigh frequent viewing of pornography may be seen as a problematic behaviour that needs more attention from both parents and teachers and also to be addressed in clinical interviews.

  • 7.
    Thornberg, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Jungert, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bystander behavior in bullying situations: basic moral sensitivity, moral disengagement and defender self-efficacy2013In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 475-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how basic moral sensitivity in bullying, moral disengagement in bullying and defender self-efficacy were related to different bystander behaviors in bullying. Therefore, we examined pathways that linked students' basic moral sensitivity, moral disengagement, and defender self-efficacy to different bystander behaviors in bullying situations. Three hundred and forty-seven teenagers completed a bullying survey. Findings indicated that compared with boys, girls expressed higher basic moral sensitivity in bullying, lower defender self-efficacy and moral disengagement in bullying. Results from the SEM showed that basic moral sensitivity in bullying was negatively related to pro-bully behavior and positively related to outsider and defender behavior, mediated by moral disengagement in bullying, which in turn was positively related to pro-bully behavior and negatively related to outsider and defender behavior. What differed in the relations between outsider and defender behaviors was the degree of defender self-efficacy.

  • 8.
    Wadsby, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Department of Child & Youth Psychiatry, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Children of mothers at psychosocial risk growing up: a follow up at the age of 162007In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 147-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to make a 16-year follow-up of children of psychosocial risk mothers as concerns emotional/behavioural problems, self-esteem, life events, and academic grades. Forty-three teenagers (index group) and 61 reference teenagers were personally interviewed and asked to answer the Youth Self-report (YSR), the Self-image questionnaire I Think I Am, and a Life Event questionnaire. Their final grades from the 9-year compulsory school were studied. The results showed that boys, especially the sons from families with alcohol/drug problems, displayed poorer mental health, a more negative self-image, had experienced more negative life events, and had to a greater extent not successfully completed the 9-year compulsory school. More teenagers in the index group had been placed in foster care, had a less positive outlook about their future, were more often smokers, and more of them (girls) had seriously considered committing suicide than the teenagers in the reference group.

    It was concluded that boys of psychosocial risk mothers are less well off than teenagers of non-risk mothers at the age of 16 as concerns psychosocial well being. It is of great importance to devote attention to these children at an early stage of life in order to be able to provide them with the support that may prevent development of future problems.

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