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  • 1.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Commentary on Berger, Hohl, and Caspar's (2009) Internet-based treatment for social phobia: a randomized controlled trial in Journal of clinical psychology, ISSN 1097-4679, vol 65, issue 10, pp 1036-10382009In: Journal of Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0021-9762, E-ISSN 1097-4679, Vol. 65, no 10, p. 1036-1038Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this commentary, we discuss the implications of the findings by Berger, Hohl, and Casper (this issue) together with the emerging database on the effects of Internet treatment for social anxiety disorder (social phobia). Their article is the third independent replication of guided Internet treatment of social anxiety disorder, and in this article, we comment on future research challenges and if Internet treatment now can be regarded as ready for dissemination into regular clinical settings.

  • 2.
    Holmqvist Larsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Björkman, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nilsson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Alliance and Rupture Observation Scale (AROS): Development and validation of an alliance and rupture measure for repeated observations within psychotherapy sessions2019In: Journal of Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0021-9762, E-ISSN 1097-4679, Vol. 75, no 3, p. 404-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to test a new observer-rated instrument, the Alliance and Rupture Observation Scale (AROS). It was designed for repeated measurements of the alliance within sessions and to detect alliance ruptures.

    Method: Videotaped therapy sessions with depressed adults were analyzed. Reliability was mainly assessed as inter-rater reliability. Convergent, predictive, and discriminant validity of the AROS was assessed by comparing the instrument with both observer-rated and patient-rated measures.

    Results: The AROS exhibited excellent inter-rater reliability. Alliance levels measured with the AROS predicted patients’ ratings of the alliance in the same session and were highly correlated with another observer-rated alliance measure. Alliance patterns (rupture; repair; and no-rupture) based on AROS scores were significantly correlated with patients’ ratings of the alliance.

    Conclusions: Preliminary support for convergent and predictive validity was found. It is yet to be determined whether AROS scores are related to psychotherapy outcomes.

  • 3.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Armelius, K.
    Countertransference feelings and the psychiatric staff's self-image2000In: Journal of Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0021-9762, E-ISSN 1097-4679, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 475-490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study of associations between psychiatric staff's habitual feelings towards their patients and the staff's self-image. At 22 psychiatric treatment homes for psychotic and other severely disturbed patients, 163 male and female staff recurrently rated their feelings towards the individual patients on a feeling checklist. At the beginning of the study period, they also rated different aspects of their self-image (the introject and the mother and father images) using Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB). Over time and over patient, correlations between the individual staff ratings on the feeling checklist and ratings on the SASB were studied for all staff and for male and female staff separately. The analyses showed a number of associations between the staff's feelings and aspects of their self-image. Staff who habitually tended to feel helpful and autonomous towards their patients had a more positive image of mother, whereas staff who tended to feel more rejecting, unhelpful, and controlled had a combination of negative images of mother and father and a protecting introject. Some notable differences between male and female staff were found. Overall, self-image accounted for larger proportions of the male staff's feelings than of the female staff's. Negative feelings for male staff were associated more-with a critical father image, whereas for female staff these feelings were associated more with an image of the father as a freedom giving. (C) 2000 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

  • 4.
    Ivanov, Volen Z.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden.
    Enander, Jesper
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden.
    Mataix-Cols, David
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden.
    Serlachius, Eva
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden.
    Mansson, Kristoffer N. T.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Flygare, Oskar
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Tolin, David
    Yale Univ, CT USA.
    Ruck, Christian
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden.
    Enhancing group cognitive-behavioral therapy for hoarding disorder with between-session Internet-based clinician support: A feasibility study2018In: Journal of Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0021-9762, E-ISSN 1097-4679, Vol. 74, no 7, p. 1092-1105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveHoarding disorder (HD) is difficult to treat. In an effort to increase efficacy and engagement in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), we developed and evaluated a novel intervention comprising group CBT combined with between-session Internet-based clinician support for people with HD. MethodTwenty participants with HD received group CBT combined with an Internet-support system enabling therapist-participant communication between group sessions. ResultsThe treatment was associated with a significant reduction on the Saving InventoryRevised (SI-R) and a large effect size (Cohens d=1.57) was found at posttreatment. Treatment gains were maintained at the 3-month follow-up. Group attendance was high and no participants dropped out from treatment prematurely. Between-session motivational support from the therapist was most frequently mentioned as the main strength of the system. ConclusionThe results of this study support adding Internet-based clinician support to group CBT for HD to increase treatment adherence and, potentially, improve the overall efficacy of CBT.

  • 5.
    Nygren, Tomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Brohede, David
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. ing, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Koshnaw, Kocher
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Osman, Shevan Sherzad
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Robert
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Internet-based treatment of depressive symptoms in a Kurdish population: A randomized controlled trial2019In: Journal of Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0021-9762, E-ISSN 1097-4679, Vol. 75, no 6, p. 985-998Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Kurdish immigrants in Sweden have a doubled risk of mental health problems, and refugee and immigrant populations underutilize mental health services. The present study investigated the efficacy of culturally adapted guided internet-based cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for depressive symptoms in a Kurdish population. Method We included 50 individuals who were randomized to either an 8-week treatment or a wait-list. The Beck Depression Inventory-II was the primary outcome measure, and measures of anxiety and insomnia were secondary outcomes. Results Depressive symptoms were significantly reduced (intention-to-treat analysis) in the treatment group, with a between-group effect size at posttreatment of Cohens d = 1.27. Moderate to large between-group effects were also observed on all secondary outcome measures. Treatment effects were sustained at 11-month follow-up. Conclusion The results provide preliminary support for culturally adapted ICBT as a complement to other treatment formats for treating symptoms of depression in a Kurdish population.

  • 6.
    Philips, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm County Council and Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Werbart, Andrzej
    Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm County Council and Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Schubert, Johan
    Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Young adults' ideas of cure prior to psychoanalytic psychotherapy2007In: Journal of Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0021-9762, E-ISSN 1097-4679, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 213-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aims to explore systematically the ideas of cure among young adults prior to psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Forty-six individuals aged 18 to 25 years who applied for psychotherapy underwent the Private Theories Interview (PTI). Twenty distinct categories of ideas of cure were identified. Based on these categories, a theoretical model was constructed with the dimensions, Approaching-Distancing and Doing-Receiving. Individuals were classified into types using "ideal type analysis." Seven ideal types were formed: Processing and Understanding, Mastering Through Own Will and Action, Talking, Discordant Ideas, Incoherent Ideas, Getting It Out, and Avoiding or Placing the Solution onto Others. New hypotheses emerged concerning ideas of cure as an important factor for psychotherapy matching, thus potentially predicting premature termination, alliance, and outcome.

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