liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Mathematical Competencies in Children With Different Types of Learning Difficulties2008In: Journal of Educational Psychology, ISSN 0022-0663, E-ISSN 1939-2176, Vol. 100, no 1, p. 48-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mathematical performance of 182 third and fourth graders in 8 different areas of mathematics was examined. The children belonged to 4 achievement groups: children with mathematic difficulties (MD only), children with both mathematic and reading difficulties (MD-RD), children with reading difficulties (RD only), and normally achieving children (control group). Both MD groups performed worse than the normally achieving children in all but 1 area, place value knowledge. The MD-only and the MD-RD children performed equally in all areas of mathematics. The RD-only group performed at the same level as the control group on all areas of mathematics. The study provides further evidence that fact retrieval deficits are a cardinal characteristic of children with MD. The MD children's substantial difficulties with mathematic word problem solving can be attributed to several processes involved in problem solving. Besides poor skills in multidigit calculation, arithmetic fact retrieval, and poor understanding of calculation principles, children with MD might have deficits related to specific problem-solving processes such as establishing a problem representation and developing a solution plan. © 2008 American Psychological Association.

  • 2.
    Axelsson, Anton
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Richard
    IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark; Lund University, Sweden.
    Gulz, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Lund University, Sweden.
    Scaffolding Executive Function Capabilities via Play-&-Learn Software for Preschoolers2016In: Journal of Educational Psychology, ISSN 0022-0663, E-ISSN 1939-2176, Vol. 108, no 7, p. 969-981Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Educational software in the form of games or so called "computer assisted intervention" for young children has become increasingly common receiving a growing interest and support. Currently there are, for instance, more than 1,000 iPad apps tagged for preschool. Thus, it has become increasingly important to empirically investigate whether these kinds of software actually provide educational benefits for such young children. The study presented in the present article investigated whether preschoolers have the cognitive capabilities necessary to benefit from a teachable-agent-based game of which pedagogical benefits have been shown for older children. The role of executive functions in childrens attention was explored by letting 36 preschoolers (3;9-6;3 years) play a teachable-agent-based educational game and measure their capabilities to maintain focus on pedagogically relevant screen events in the presence of competing visual stimuli. Even though the participants did not succeed very well in an inhibition pretest, results showed that they nonetheless managed to inhibit distractions during game-play. It is suggested that the game context acts as a motivator that scaffolds more mature cognitive capabilities in young children than they exhibit during a noncontextual standardized test. The results further indicate gender differences in the development of these capabilities.

  • 3.
    Byrne, Brian
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Coventry, William L.
    University of New England.
    Olson, Richard K.
    University of Colorado.
    Wadsworth, Sally J.
    University of Colorado.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Petrill, Stephen A.
    Ohio State University.
    Willcutt, Erik G.
    University of Colorado.
    Corley, Robin
    University of Colorado.
    Teacher Effects in Early Literacy Development: Evidence From a Study of Twins2010In: Journal of Educational Psychology, ISSN 0022-0663, E-ISSN 1939-2176, Vol. 102, no 1, p. 32-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is often assumed that differences in teacher characteristics area major source of variability in childrens educational achievements. We examine this assumption for early literacy achievement by calculating the correlations between pairs of twin children who either shared or did not share a teacher in kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 2. Teacher effects-or, more strictly, classroom effects-would show up as higher correlations for same-class than for different-class twin pairs. Same-class correlations were generally higher than different-class correlations.. though not significantly so on most occasions. On the basis of the results, we estimate that the maximum variance accounted for by being assigned to the same or different classrooms is 8%. This is an upper-bound figure for a teacher effect because factors other than teachers may contribute to variation attributable to classroom assignment. We discuss the limitations of the study and draw out some of its educational implications.

  • 4. Gillström, Å.
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Prediction and calibration accuracy of texts: Reading skill, reading strategies, and effort.1995In: Journal of Educational Psychology, ISSN 0022-0663, E-ISSN 1939-2176, Vol. 87, p. 545-558Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Byrne, Brian
    University of New England, Australia.
    Quain, Peter
    University of New England, Australia.
    Wadsworth, Sally
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Corley, Robin
    University of Colorado, USA.
    DeFries, John. C
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Willcutt, Eric
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Olson, Richard. K
    University of Colorado.
    Environmental and genetic influences on prereading skills in Australia, Scandinavia, and the United States2005In: Journal of Educational Psychology, ISSN 0022-0663, E-ISSN 1939-2176, Vol. 97, no 4, p. 705-722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individual differences in measures of prereading skills and in questionnaire measures of 4-5-year-old twins' print environments in Australia, Scandinavia, and the United States were explored with a behavioral-genetic design. Modest phenotypic correlations were found between environmental measures and the twins' print knowledge, general verbal ability, and phoneme awareness. Lower print knowledge in Scandinavian twins was related to country differences in preschool print environment. Latent-trait behavioral-genetic analyses indicated very strong shared-environment influences on individual differences in Print Knowledge. Genetic influence was also significant. Several other prereading skills varied in their environmental and genetic influence, including a significant contrast between Phonological Awareness and Print Knowledge. Rapid Naming also revealed very strong genetic influence, as did Verbal Memory. Stronger shared-environment influences were found for Vocabulary and Grammar/Morphology. Genetic and environmental correlations among latent traits for General Verbal Ability, Phonological Awareness, and Print Knowledge were high, but there were also significant independent genetic and environmental contributions to each skill. Practical implications include the need for substantial and sustained instructional support for children hampered by genetic constraints on early literacy development. Copyright 2005 by the American Psychological Association.

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf