liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Östergren, Rickard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Number magnitude processing and basic cognitive functions in children with mathematical learning disabilities2012In: Learning and individual differences, ISSN 1041-6080, E-ISSN 1873-3425, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 701-714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study sought out to extend our knowledge regarding the origin ofmathematical learning disabilities (MLD) in children by testing different hypotheses in the same samples of children. Different aspects of cognitive functions and number processing were assessed in fifth- and sixth-graders (1113 years old) withMLD and compared to controls. The MLD group displayed weaknesses withmost aspects of number processing (e.g., subitizing, symbolic number comparison, number-line estimation) and two cognitive functions (e.g., visualspatial working memory). These findings favor the defective approximate number system (ANS) hypothesis, but do not fit well with the access deficit hypothesis. Support is also provided for the defective object-tracking system (OTS) hypothesis, the domain general cognitive deficit hypothesis and to some extent the defective numerosity-coding hypothesis. The study suggests that MLD might be caused by multiple deficits and not a single core deficit.

  • 2.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Deaf signers use phonology to do arithmetic2014In: Learning and individual differences, ISSN 1041-6080, E-ISSN 1873-3425, Vol. 32, p. 246-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deaf students generally lag several years behind hearing peers in arithmetic, but little is known about the mechanisms behind this. In the present study we investigated how phonological skills interact with arithmetic. Eighteen deaf signers and eighteen hearing non-signers took part in an experiment that manipulated arithmetic and phonological knowledge in the language modalities of sign and speech. Independent tests of alphabetical and native language phonological skills were also administered. There was no difference in performance between groups on subtraction, but hearing non-signers performed better than deaf signers on multiplication. For the deaf signers but not the hearing non-signers, multiplicative reasoning was associated with both alphabetical and phonological skills. This indicates that deaf signing adults rely on language processes to solve multiplication tasks, possibly because automatization of multiplication is less well established in deaf adults.

  • 3.
    Fujisawa, Keiko K.
    et al.
    Keio University, Japan .
    Wadsworth, Sally J.
    University of Colorado, CO USA .
    Kakihana, Shinichiro
    Koriyama Womens University, Japan .
    Olson, Richard K.
    University of Colorado, CO USA .
    DeFries, John C.
    University of Colorado, CO USA .
    Byrne, Brian
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. University of New England, Australia .
    Ando, Juko
    Keio University, Japan .
    A multivariate twin study of early literacy in Japanese kana2013In: Learning and individual differences, ISSN 1041-6080, E-ISSN 1873-3425, Vol. 24, p. 160-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This first Japanese twin study of early literacy development investigated the extent to which genetic and environmental factors influence individual differences in prereading skills in 238 pairs of twins at 42 months of age. Twin pairs were individually tested on measures of phonological awareness, kana letter name/sound knowledge, receptive vocabulary, visual perception, nonword repetition, and digit span. Results obtained from univariate behavioral-genetic analyses yielded little evidence for genetic influences, but substantial shared-environmental influences, for all measures. Phenotypic confirmatory factor analysis suggested three correlated factors: phonological awareness, letter name/sound knowledge, and general prereading skills. Multivariate behavioral genetic analyses confirmed relatively small genetic and substantial shared environmental influences on the factors. The correlations among the three factors were mostly attributable to shared environment. Thus, shared environmental influences play an important role in the early reading development of Japanese children.

  • 4.
    Furnes, Bjarte
    et al.
    Stavanger university.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Phonological awareness and rapid automatized naming predicting early development in reading and spelling: Results from a cross-linguistic longutudinal study.2011In: Learning and individual differences, ISSN 1041-6080, E-ISSN 1873-3425, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 85-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the relationship between latent constructs of phonological awareness (PA) and rapid automatized naming (RAN) was investigated and related to later measures of reading and spelling in children learning to read in different alphabetic writing systems (i.e., Norwegian/Swedish vs. English). 750 U.S./Australian children and 230 Scandinavian children were followed longitudinally between kindergarten and 2nd grade. PA and RAN were measured in kindergarten and Grade 1, while word recognition, phonological decoding, and spelling were measured in kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 2. In general, high stability was observed for the various reading and spelling measures, such that little additional variance was left open for PA and RAN. However, results demonstrated that RAN was more related to reading than spelling across orthographies, with the opposite pattern shown for PA. In addition, tests of measurement invariance show that the factor loadings of each observed indicator on the latent PA factor was the same across U.S./Australia and Scandinavia. Similar findings were obtained for RAN. In general, tests of structural invariance show that models of early literacy development are highly transferable across languages.

  • 5.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Byrne, Brian
    University of New England, Australia.
    Olson, Richard K.
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Hulslander, Jacqueline
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Wadsworth, Sally
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Corley, Robin
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Willcutt, Erik G.
    University of Colorado, USA.
    DeFries, John C.
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Response to early literacy instruction in the United States, Australia, and Scandinavia: A behavioral-genetic analysis2008In: Learning and individual differences, ISSN 1041-6080, E-ISSN 1873-3425, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 289-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetic and environmental influences on early reading and spelling at the end of kindergarten and Grade 1 were compared across three twin samples tested in the United States, Australia, and Scandinavia. Proportions of variance due to genetic influences on kindergarten reading were estimated at .84 in Australia, .68 in the U.S., and .33 in Scandinavia. The effects of shared environment on kindergarten reading were estimated at .09 in Australia, .25 in the U.S., and .52 in Scandinavia. A similar pattern of genetic and environmental influences was obtained for kindergarten spelling. One year later when twins in all three samples had received formal literacy instruction for at least one full school year, heritability was similarly high across country, with estimated genetic influences varying between .79 and .83 for reading and between .62 and .79 for spelling. These findings indicate that the pattern of genetic and environmental influences on early reading and spelling development varies according to educational context, with genetic influence increasing as a function of increasing intensity of early instruction. Longitudinal analyses revealed genetic continuity for both reading and spelling between kindergarten and Grade 1 across country. However, a new genetic factor comes into play accounting for independent variance in reading at Grade 1 in the U.S. and Scandinavia, suggesting a change in genetic influences on reading. Implications for response-to-instruction are discussed.

  • 6.
    Träff, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Chiara Passolunghi, Maria
    University of Trieste, Italy.
    Mathematical skills in children with dyslexia2015In: Learning and individual differences, ISSN 1041-6080, E-ISSN 1873-3425, Vol. 40, p. 108-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mathematical performance of 17 children with developmental dyslexia (DD) was assessed and compared to a control group to examine whether difficulties related to reading and phonological processing affect the development of mathematical skills. The DD group performed worse than the controls on number fact retrieval, multi-step arithmetic problem solving, and multi-digit calculation, whereas their scores on tasks tapping approximate arithmetic and conceptual understanding (i.e., place value, calculation principles) were equal to the controls. In view of the Triple-code model, the findings demonstrate that children with DD have problems with tasks depending on verbal phonological number codes but have no problems with tasks depending on analogue magnitude representations or visual-Arabic number codes. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Träff, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Desoete, Annemie
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Chiara Passolunghi, Maria
    University of Trieste, Italy.
    Symbolic and non-symbolic number processing in children with developmental dyslexia2017In: Learning and individual differences, ISSN 1041-6080, E-ISSN 1873-3425, Vol. 56, p. 105-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined number processing in 10-year-olds with developmental dyslexia (DD). The, phonological deficit and double deficit hypotheses imply that children with DD might have a connection deficit that affects their ability to establish links between number symbols and magnitude representations. The double deficit hypothesis also posits that symbolic number difficulties may emerge due to difficulties with processes underlying rapid automatic naming (RAN). The DD group displayed difficulties with symbolic number processing but not with non-symbolic number processing. However, the underlying processes of this access or connection deficit appeared not to be related to phonological awareness or RAN. The DD group displayed impaired arithmetic fluency and calculation that were accounted for by defective processes. underlying RAN. In view of the triple-code model, children with DD have impaired-verbal number codes or defective access to verbal number codes but an intact core magnitude representation. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf