liu.seSök publikationer i DiVA
Ändra sökning
Avgränsa sökresultatet
1 - 20 av 20
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Träffar per sida
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
Markera
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Blomberg, J
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Stockholm Cty Council Inst Psychotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lazar, A
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Stockholm Cty Council Inst Psychotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandell, Rolf
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap.
    Long-term outcome of long-term psychoanalytically oriented therapies: First findings of the Stockholm outcome of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis study2001Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 11, nr 4, s. 361-382Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The scarcity of findings on the effectiveness of psychodynamic long-term psychotherapy and psychoanalysis is a problem, at least in countries where these treatments are the general treatment of choice. In this study, a sample of 105 patients in various stages before, during, and after treatment was drawn froth a population of 1,200 patients who had received or were on a waiting list for public subsidized long-term psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy or psychoanalysis. The average duration was 40 months for the psychotherapies and 51 months for the psychoanalyses. All patients completed a questionnaire, including the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90), Sense of Coherence Scale (SOCS), and Social Adjustment Scale (SAS), on 3 occasions with 12-month intervals. Using a partly within- and between-subjects design, group means were regressed on an ordinal time scale covering 7 stages in the treatment process: before, early during, during, late during, soon after, after, and late after treatment. The slopes indicated small to moderate effect sizes (d = 0.4-0.6) for psychotherapy and moderate to very large effect sizes (d = 0.4-1.5) for psychoanalysis. The largest effect sizes were on the SCL-90 and the lowest on the SAS for both groups. The proportions of patients with more "healthy" scores compared, with the worst scoring 10% in a nonclinical norm group increased from roughly 30% to 55% in the psychotherapy group and from 10% to 75% in the psychoanalysis group. The results underscore the importance of long-terns follow-up when evaluation of long-term treatments is concerned.

  • 2.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Samtalscentrum Unga Vuxna, Nyköping, Sweden .
    Does psychotherapy for young adults in routine practice show similar results as therapy in randomized clinical trials?2010Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 20, nr 2, s. 181-192Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research indicates that patients treated with psychotherapy in the community do not stay in treatment long enough to achieve clinically significant change. Because the average patient seeking treatment at a community center may not be as informed and motivated for change as the average patient participating in a research trial, the authors compared outcome among all patients presenting to a mental health clinic (n=416) and a subgroup of patients who started psychotherapy at the same clinic (n=101). Outcome was assessing using the Symptom Checklist-90, Inventory of Interpersonal Problems, and Global Assessment of Functioning. Results confirmed that outcome among all patients seeking the centre was worse than in an average clinical trial. However, patients who started psychotherapy after assessment achieved results comparable to those in RCT studies.

  • 3.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    et al.
    Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Granström, Fredrik
    Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Working alliance predicts psychotherapy outcome even while controlling for prior symptom improvement2014Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 24, nr 2, s. 146-159Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Although the working alliance as been found to be a robust predictor of psychotherapy outcome, critics have questioned the causal status of this effect. Specifically, the effect of the alliance may be confounded with the effect of prior symptom improvement. The objective of the present study was to test this possibility. Method: A large dataset from primary care psychotherapy was used to study relationships between alliance and outcome using piecewise multilevel path analysis. Results: Initial symptom level and symptom change up to session three predicted the alliance at session three. Working alliance significantly predicted symptom change rate from session three to termination, even while controlling for several possible confounds. Conclusions: The alliance predicts outcome over and above the effect of prior symptom improvement, supporting a reciprocal influence model of the relationship between alliance and symptom change.

  • 4.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Grant, Johan
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Review of organizational effects on the outcome of mental health treatments2018Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 28, nr 1, s. 76-90Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: As there are theoretical, clinical, and "common sense" reasons to expect a relationship between organizational factors and outcome in clinics providing psychotherapy and other mental health treatments, a review of empirical research in this area was undertaken with the aim of finding empirical evidence for organizational effects. Methods: A structured search for studies on organizational differences in patient mental health outcomes was performed using EBSCO host, Cochrane Library Database, and the Health Systems Evidence database at McMasters University. Finished studies published in English were included if they presented data from more than one mental health service and used change in symptom, level of functioning, or quality of life as outcome. Results: The search yielded not more than 19 studies fulfilling inclusion criteria. All studies showed some evidence for organization effects, and there was some evidence for organizational climate and culture explaining differences in outcome. Conclusion: Given that mental health treatments are likely to be especially susceptive to organizational effects, it is remarkable that not more research has been devoted to this. Clearly, more research is needed to study the consequences of work organization for the outcome of psychotherapy. Methodological issues in organizational studies are discussed.

  • 5.
    Hatcher, Robert L.
    et al.
    CUNY, NY 10016 USA.
    Lindqvist, Karin
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Psychometric evaluation of the Working Alliance Inventory?Therapist version: Current and new short forms2019Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Working Alliance Inventory (WAI) and its short forms are widely used, although the properties of the therapists? versions have been little studied. Method: We examined the psychometric properties of two short forms (WAI-S-T, WAI-SR-T), and explored the creation of a psychometrically stronger short form using contemporary measure development techniques. Well-fitting items from the full 36-item WAI were identified in a development sample (131 therapists, 688 patients) using multi-level Bayesian Structural Equation Modeling, accounting for therapist rated effects. Multi-level Item Response Theory (IRT) methods aided creation of a revised short form (WAI-S-T-IRT). Factor structures of the three forms were assessed using multi-level ML estimation with robust standard errors. Results: Collinearity problems for the Goal and Task dimensions led to testing a two-factor model (Goal?Task, Bond). All three measures showed satisfactory fit; the WAI-S-T-IRT fit slightly better but differences were minor. Testing the structures in an independent sample (N?=?1117) yielded essentially the same results. No version showed strong measurement invariance. Discussion: Continued use of current therapist forms is supported; differentiation of theoretical dimensions is difficult with current measures, and may not be possible with self-report forms.

  • 6.
    Holmqvist Larsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Center for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Alliance ruptures and repairs in psychotherapy in primary care2018Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 28, nr 1, s. 123-136Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The association between alliance level and outcome in psychotherapy has been extensively studied. One way to expand this knowledge is to study alliance patterns. The main aims of this study were to examine how frequent alliance patterns with ruptures or rupture-repair episodes were in a naturalistic sample of psychotherapies in primary care, and if three alliance patterns (a Rupture pattern, a Repair pattern, and a No Rupture pattern) were differentially associated with treatment outcome.

    METHOD: The psychotherapies (N = 605) included a wide range of different treatment orientations and patient diagnoses. Alliance patterns were studied at session-to-session level, using patient-rated alliance scores. Outcome data were analyzed using longitudinal multilevel modeling with a slopes-as-outcomes model.

    RESULTS: The Repair pattern accounted for 14.7% (n = 89) of the treatments, 10.7% (n = 65) exhibited a Rupture pattern, and 74.5% (n = 451) contained no ruptures. The Rupture pattern was associated with inferior treatment outcomes. The Repair pattern was, in longer treatments, associated with better outcomes than the No Rupture pattern.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results support theory about the importance of ruptures in the therapeutic alliance and suggest that identification of alliance ruptures is important in alliance-outcome research, for feedback purposes in clinical practice, and in training of therapists.

  • 7.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Philips, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Barkham, Michael
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Developing practice-based evidence: Benefits, challenges, and tensions2015Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 25, nr 1, s. 20-31Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Attempts to regulate service delivery in line with results from randomized trials have been vigorously debated. In this paper, results from practice-based studies using the CORE System illustrate the potential to enrich knowledge about the actual outcome of psychological therapy in routine care. These studies also provide data for important questions in psychotherapy research, like orientation differences, the importance of the therapist factor, number of sessions needed for clinical effect, and the alliance-outcome question. Obstacles and challenges in making such studies are illustrated. In conclusion, arguments are put forward for introducing a common measurement system that strikes a balance between clinicians' questions and the need for comparable data, and that encompasses the complexities of patients' reasons for seeking psychological help.

  • 8.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Philips, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Barkham, Michael
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Implementing routine outcome monitoring in clinical practice: Benefits, challenges, and solutions2015Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 25, nr 1, s. 20-31Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reviews the benefits, obstacles, and challenges that can hinder (and have hindered) implementation of routine outcome monitoring in clinical practice. Recommendations for future routine outcome assessment efforts are also provided. Spanning three generations, as well as multiple developed tools and approaches, the four authors of this article have spent much of their careers working to address these issues and attempt to consolidate this learning and experience briefly here. Potential "elephants in the room" are brought into the discussion wherever relevant, rather than leaving them to obstruct silently the fields efforts. Some of these topics have been largely ignored, yet must be addressed if we are to fulfill our promise of integrating science and practice. This article is an attempt to identify these important issues and start an honest and open dialogue.

  • 9.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Philips, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Mellor-Clark, John
    CORE Informat Management Syst, England.
    Client and therapist agreement about the clients problemsAssociations with treatment alliance and outcome2016Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 26, nr 4, s. 399-409Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: A shared understanding of the patients symptoms and problems is seen by most theories as a crucial aspect of the collaboration in therapy, presumably influencing alliance and outcome. The empirical ground for this argument is not solid, however. Several studies have found weak associations between a common view of the patients problems and outcome. The purpose of the present study was to analyze whether agreement in the understanding of the patients depression and anxiety problems was important for alliance and outcome. Method: The study used data from a practice-based study using the CORE system with 846 patients who received psychological treatment in primary care. Results: The analyses indicated that although patients who were assessed by their therapists as having depression and anxiety problems scored higher on these subscales than other patients, about half of the patients reported such problems when the therapists did not, and vice versa. Agreement was not associated with better alliance or outcome. Conclusions: Productive collaboration in psychotherapy may be based on other factors than agreement about symptoms.

  • 10.
    Keselman, Henrich
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Osvaldsson Cromdal, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Kullgard, Niclas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Responding to mentalization invitations in psychotherapy sessions: A conversation analysis approach2018Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Increase in the capacity to mentalize has been proposed to be an important mechanism of change in psychotherapy. However, mentalization has primarily been studied as an individual skill that people either possess or lack, rather than as an interactional phenomenon. 

    Method: In this study, excerpts from three different sessions in a therapy that aimed at increasing the patients mentalizing capacity were identified and studied using conversation analysis. 

    Results: The analysis indicated that resistance to mentalizing may not only be due to lack of capacity but also may be seen as a linguistic resource in which this resistance demonstrates precisely the ability to mentalize. 

    Conclusions: Consequences for psychotherapy practice and process research are discussed.

  • 11.
    Lazar, A.
    et al.
    Stockholm County Council Institute of Psychotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandell, R.
    Stockholm County Council Institute of Psychotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grant, J.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    An individual differences perspective on change in psychotherapy: The case of health care utilization2007Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 17, nr 6, s. 690-705Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to explore systematic interindividual variation in change of a number of health care utilization variables (HCUVs) during psychotherapy and identify patient characteristics associated with this variation. Three-wave panel data from 420 patients were analyzed with nonparametric latent class regression followed by chi-square interaction analyses among patient variables. For the various HCUVs, three to six classes were identified, with widely different patterns of change during treatment. Axis I diagnosis, chronicity, functional impairment, gender, and level of education were among the patient characteristics that differentiated the classes. It was concluded that main effects analyses seriously distort heterogeneity of change and that health care utilization, unless it is a specific therapeutic aim, may be irrelevant as an indication of outcome of psychotherapy.

  • 12.
    Lazar, A.
    et al.
    Stockholm County Council, Institute of Psychotherapy, Linköping University, Björngårdsgatan 25, SE 118 52 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandell, Rolf
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap.
    Grant, J.
    Do psychoanalytic treatments have positive effects on health and health care utilization? Further findings of the Stockholm Outcome of Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis Project (STOPPP)2006Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 16, nr 1, s. 51-66Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Effects of psychoanalytic treatment on subjective health and health care utilization were studied in a sample of 420 patients in various stages of psychotherapeutic treatment. Outcome measures, based on a self-report questionnaire taken for three consecutive years, included the Self-Rated Health Scale (SRH), General Symptom Index (GSI) from the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90), and Sense of Coherence Scale (SOCS) as well as self-reports on health care utilization during the past 12 months. The study had a quasi-experimental, accelerated longitudinal design. Individual raw scores of the dependent variables were regressed, one by one, on an eight-step treatment stage scale. Sex, age, and education level were entered in a first block to partial out their possible effects. In contrast to the significant positive developments found on the subjective health measures (SRH, GSI, and SOCS), no significant change was found on the health care utilization variables. The complications in interpreting psychotherapy effects on health and health care utilization are discussed. © 2006 Society for Psychotherapy Research.

  • 13.
    Möller, Clara
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Karlgren, Linda
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Sandell, Anton
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Philips, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Stockholm County Council, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Mentalization-based therapy adherence and competence stimulates in-session mentalization in psychotherapy for borderline personality disorder with co-morbid substance dependence2017Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 27, nr 6, s. 749-765Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To test whether adherence to mentalization-based treatment (MBT) principles predict better patient in-session mentalizing. Methods: Two sessions for each of 15 patients with borderline personality disorder and comorbid substance abuse disorder were rated for MBT adherence and competence. Individual patient statements were rated for Reflective Functioning (RF), therapist statements were rated as demanding RF or not. Data were analysed using multilevel modelling. Results: MBT adherence and competence predicted higher session RF (=.58-.75), even while controlling for pre-treatment RF. In addition, therapist interventions directed toward exploring mental states predicted higher RF of subsequent patient responses (=.11-.12). Conclusions: MBT adherence and competence were significantly related to patient in-session mentalizing, supporting the validity of MBT principles. Results point to the importance of supervision for therapists to become adherent to MBT principles. The small number of patients and sessions limits generalizability of results.

  • 14.
    Nilsson, T.
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, Hospital of Trelleborg, Trelleborg, Sweden.
    Svensson, M.
    Primary Health Care Halland, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Sandell, Rolf
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap.
    Clinton, D.
    Psychiatric Research and Development Unit, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Patients' experiences of change in cognitive-behavioral therapy and psychodynamic therapy: A qualitative comparative study2007Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 17, nr 5, s. 553-566Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Research suggests that different therapeutic approaches produce roughly equivalent outcomes despite their theoretical and technical differences. This study explores whether the quantitative equivalence may conceal differences in patients' experiences of the quality of change. Thirty-two patients who had terminated cognitive - Behavioral therapy or psychodynamic therapy were interviewed about their experiences in psychotherapy. The cases were clustered in four groups depending on type of therapy and whether outcome was judged as satisfactory or not. An outcome narrative was reconstructed for each type. Even though the ratio of satisfactory to unsatisfactory cases was roughly equal in the two types of treatments, there were obvious differences in the kinds or quality of outcome that were reported as well as some experiences common to the two groups of patients. The narratives of the dissatisfied patients underscored the importance of matching the approach to the patient.

  • 15.
    Sandell, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap.
    Blomberg, J.
    Blomberg, J..
    Lazar, A.
    Lazar, A..
    Time matters: On temporal interactions in long-term follow-up of long-term psychotherapies2002Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 12, nr 1, s. 39-58Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The roles of treatment duration, session frequency, and their interaction were studied in a sample of 156 patients who had terminated psychotherapy or psychoanalysis. The outcome parameters were treatment end-state and posttreatment change with respect to symptom distress, measured by the General Symptom Index from the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90), morale, as indicated by the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOCS) overall mean, and the quality of social functioning, according to the Social Adjustment Scale overall mean, all of them taken for 3 consecutive years after termination of treatment. Growth curve modeling on the basis of covariance and mean structures yielded 5 principal results. First, outcome changed significantly after treatment termination. Second, end-state and posttreatment changes were influenced by duration and frequency but primarily in interaction. Thus, the effects of duration and frequency were conditional on each other. Third, the joint effects on end-state were small and on posttreatment change, small to moderate. Fourth, on the SCL-90 and the SOCS, there were outcome reversals during the posttreatment period such that good end-states deteriorated in the long run, whereas modest end-states improved considerably. Fifth, generally, the findings seemed to favor low-duration/low-frequency and high-duration/high-frequency treatments in this sample.

  • 16.
    Sandell, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap.
    Carlsson, J.
    Stockholm County Council, Institute of Psychotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Schubert, J.
    Stockholm County Council, Institute of Psychotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Broberg, J.
    Stockholm County Council, Institute of Psychotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lazar, A.
    Linköping University, S-581 83 Linköping, Sweden, Stockholm County Council, Institute of Psychotherapy, Stockholm, SwedenStockholm County Council, Institute of Psychotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden, .
    Grant, J.
    Therapist attitudes and patient outcomes: I. Development and validation of the therapeutic attitudes scales (TASC-2)2004Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 14, nr 4, s. 469-484Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the study were to develop and standardize, using a random sample of licensed psychotherapists in Sweden, an instrument to explore therapeutic attitudes. Nine factors were extracted and cross-validated from Therapeutic Identity, a comprehensive questionnaire. The factor scales predicted with considerable accuracy self-designated theoretical orientations of the therapists and were associated with therapists' level of experience. A cluster analysis of the therapists on the basis of the factor scales revealed interesting variations, particularly within the psychodynamic and eclectic parts of the spectrum of therapeutic attitudes. © 2004 Society for Psychotherapy Research.

  • 17.
    Sandell, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap.
    Carlsson, J.
    Stockholm County Council Institute of Psychotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Schubert, J.
    Stockholm County Council Institute of Psychotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grant, J.
    Lazar, A.
    Linköping University, Linkoping, Sweden, Stockholm County Council Institute of Psychotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Broberg, J.
    Stockholm County Council Institute of Psychotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Therapists' therapies: The relation between training therapy and patient change in long-term psychotherapy and psychoanalysis2006Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 16, nr 3, s. 306-316Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients' development across stages in long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy or psychoanalysis was studied in relation to various parameters of their therapists' training, or personal, therapies. The change variable was symptom distress, the General Symptom Index, according to the Symptom Checklist-90. A series of latent class regression analyses revealed that one class of therapists (16% of the sample) whose patients had the least change in treatment, and in fact had nonsignificant deterioration, was significantly overrepresented by psychotherapists with long psychoanalyses for their training therapies. Alternative interpretations of the findings are discussed. © 2006 Society for Psychotherapy Research.

  • 18.
    Sandell, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap.
    Lazar, A.
    Linköping University, Stockholm County Council Institute of Psychotherapy, Linköping, United Kingdom.
    Grant, J.
    Carlsson, J.
    Stockholm County Council Institute of Psychotherapy.
    Schubert, J.
    Stockholm County Council Institute of Psychotherapy.
    Broberg, J.
    Stockholm County Council Institute of Psychotherapy.
    Therapist attitudes and patient outcomes: II. Therapist attitudes influence change during treatment2007Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 17, nr 2, s. 201-211Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychotherapists' beliefs and attitudes in therapeutic matters, according to the Therapist Attitudes Scales (TASC-2) (Sandell et al., 2004), were related to symptom distress, as measured by the Symptom Checklist-90, in 2 groups of patients: one in ongoing psychoanalytical psychotherapy and the other posttreatment. In the posttreatment group, the zero-order correlations with symptom distress were significant for the therapist's attitudes toward kindness and insight as curative factors and supportiveness as a therapeutic style and his or her views on the nature of psychotherapy as a form of artistry, however, they were all near zero and nonsignificant in the in-treatment group. To account for correlations among the attitude variables, multiple regression analyses were compared between the groups. The multiple correlation was essentially zero in the latter group, whereas there was a significant multiple correlation of .51 in the former group. Thus Posttreatment outcome was significantly related to the therapist's position on the TASC-2 scales. Kindness and Artistry had particularly strong relations with the posttreatment results, with Neutrality acting like a suppressor. The pattern of relations suggested that therapist attitudes functioned as moderators rather than as mediators.

  • 19.
    Söderberg, Anna Karin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Elfors, Caroline
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Holmqvist Larsson, Mattias
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Emotional availability in psychotherapy: The usefulness and validity of the Emotional Availability Scales for analyzing the psychotherapeutic relationship2014Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 24, nr 1, s. 91-102Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to assess whether a modified version of the Emotional Availability Scales (EAS), created to assess interaction quality between parents and children, could be applied to psychotherapy sessions and whether emotional availability (EA), as assessed by the modified EAS-T, was associated with client- and therapist-rated working alliance. EAS-T was used to assess 42 sessions from 16 therapies. The therapies came from the LURIPP project, comparing IPT with BRT for depressed clients. The results showed that sessions could be reliably rated with EAS-T. Most rating scales had acceptable variance. The clients perception of task alliance was associated with several of the EA subscales (sensitivity, nonhostility, responsiveness) assessed over therapies, whereas the perception of bond was associated with Structure on EAS.

  • 20.
    Viklund, Erika
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för klinisk och socialpsykologi (CS). Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Holmquist, Rolf
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för klinisk och socialpsykologi (CS). Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Zetterqvist Nelson, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Client-identified important events in psychotherapy: Interactional structures and practices2010Ingår i: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 20, nr 2, s. 151-164Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes interactional structures and practices in client-identified important events in psychotherapy sessions. Twelve of 16 events from seven client-therapist dyads were found to contain disagreement. A turn-by-turn investigation using conversation analysis displayed three different ways that therapists used to handle disagreement. The first was to orient to the client's disagreement cues by inviting the client to elaborate his or her point and to establish a shared understanding. The second was to orient to the client's disagreement cues but define the therapist's point of view as more relevant to the project at hand. The third was a single case where the therapist did not orient to the client's disagreement cues. The results suggest that disagreement patterns may be an interesting focus for further exploration of microprocesses within therapy sessions.

1 - 20 av 20
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf