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  • 1.
    Alm, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Role of Shyness and Self–Focused Attention for Attribution of Reactions in Social Situations to Internal and External Causes2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 519-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hypothesis that shyness would be associated with attribution of emotional reactions to stable internal causes rather than to less stable internal and external causes was tested in Study 1 (N = 60). In Study 2 (N= 112) the hypothesis that the explanatory power of shyness would decrease once the effect of self-focused attention on attribution to stable internal causes had been controlled for was tested. The results confirmed both hypotheses. Shyness correlated positively with attribution to stable internal causes, but non-significant with attribution to less stable internal and external causes. Shyness explained a lesser portion of the variance in attribution to both of the internal causes when controlling for self-focus. Even though the findings indicate that self-focus is central to the social cognitive processes of shy individuals, they also suggest that self-focus cannot fully explain attribution to internal causes in general and shy individuals' attributional pattern in particular.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Net effect of memory collaboration: How is collaboration affected by factors such as friendship, gender and age?2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 367-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to investigate explicit spatial and verbal collaborative memory performance. Factors such as friendship, age and gender were chosen for ecological and theoretical reasons. In Experiment I friendship and age were studied. The task was to retrieve the location of 25 pictures, which were presented in a 5 x 5-matrix grid. All participants retrieved once individually and once dyadically. Dyads were compared to the predicted base line, i.e., the pooled score from two participants working on their own (the same participants as in the dyad). Based on cognitive development aspects and collaboration data, it was predicted that the young collaborating dyads would not be able to reduce the net negative effects of collaboration to the same extent as older dyads. The findings revealed that, (1) dyadic collaboration affected spatial memory performance negatively, i.e., net negative effects of collaboration; (2) older (15-years-old), as opposed to young (7-years-old) dyads, reduced the net negative effects of collaboration and; (3) friend dyads, regardless of age, were able to reduce the net negative effect. In experiment 2, gender differences were studied in two explicit memory tasks. The purpose was to investigate if earlier findings of collaboration can be generalised to another ecological aspect of group composition, i.e., gender. Gender differences were studied at individual and group level. The results suggest that gender related memory differences exist on an individual and dyadic level in terms of absolute scores. Women remember explicit memory tasks to a greater degree than men. No main effect was found for gender in collaboration. i.e., both genders suffered compared to predicted potential.

  • 3. Armelius, K.
    et al.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Staff members' feelings toward psychiatric patients related to their own and the patient's self-image and gender2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 69-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relation between staff members' feelings toward a patient and their own and the patient's self-image in different gender combination groups was studied. Staff at 16 psychiatric treatment homes for patients with severe psychopathology reported their feelings toward their patients on a number of occasions. At the start of treatment, both staff members and patients rated their self-images using the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB). Male staff seemed less influenced by the patient, with their feelings relating mainly to aspects of their own self-image, while the feelings of the female staff were more related to the patient's self-image. The patient's diagnosis was less important for a staff member's feelings than that member's self-image. Generally, the relation between feelings and self-image was stronger for negative feelings. The results point to the importance of understanding more about the influence of staff members' self-structure on their negative feelings toward their patients and how this relates to both the staff member's and patient's gender.

  • 4.
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Danderyd University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Maroti, Daniel
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet; and ME/CFS-rehabilitation, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyd University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bejerot, Susanne
    Department of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome do not score higher on the autism-spectrum quotient than healthy controls: Comparison with autism spectrum disorder2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 59, no 4, p. 428-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinically, there is an overlap of several symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including fatigue; brain "fog"; cognitive impairments; increased sensitivity to sound, light, and odour; increased pain and tenderness; and impaired emotional contact. Adults with CFS (n = 59) or ASD (n = 50) and healthy controls (HC; n = 53) were assessed with the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) in a cross-sectional study. Non-parametric analysis was used to compare AQ scores among the groups. Univariate analysis of variance (ANCOVA) was used to identify if age, sex, or diagnostic group influenced the differences in scores. Patients with ASD scored significantly higher on the AQ than the CFS group and the HC group. No differences in AQ scores were found between the CFS and HC groups. AQ results were influenced by the diagnostic group but not by age or sex, according to ANCOVA. Despite clinical observations of symptom overlap between ASD and CFS, adult patients with CFS report few autistic traits in the self-report instrument, the AQ. The choice of instrument to assess autistic traits may influence the results.

  • 5. Bäckman, L.
    et al.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Episodic remembering in young adults, 73 year olds, and 82 year olds1986In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 27, p. 320-325Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Bäckman, L.
    et al.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    The relation between level of general knowledge and feeling-of-knowing: An adult age-study1985In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 26, p. 249-258Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Campbell, Ruth
    et al.
    University College London.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cognitive Hearing Science: The view from hearing impairment and deafness.: Editorial in Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, vol 50, issue 5, pp 367-3692009In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 367-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 8.
    Caravita, Simona C. S.
    et al.
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Italy.
    Stefanelli, Sara
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Italy.
    Mazzone, Angela
    Dublin City Univ, Ireland.
    Cadel, Livia
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Italy.
    Farkas, Ildiko
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ambrosini, Barbara
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Italy.
    When the bullied peer is native-born vs. immigrant: A mixed-method study with a sample of native-born and immigrant adolescents2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing number of immigrant students attend Italian schools, with the possibility of being involved in bullying episodes. A few studies have investigated this phenomenon, providing some evidence that immigrant students may face an increased risk of being bullied compared to native-born students. The present study adopted a mixed-method design, which may better detect the dynamics of bullying towards immigrant peers. Participants were 692 native-born and immigrant students (20.5% with immigrant background; 54.8% females) who filled in self-report measures about their bullying experiences, popularity, acceptance of diversity at school, and prejudice. Thirty-five pupils (54% with immigrant background) were also interviewed. Two hypothetical bullying scenarios were presented: one depicting a native-born victim and one depicting an immigrant victim. After each scenario, adolescents were encouraged to reason about the motives for bullying. Quantitative data showed that general bullying was associated with perceived popularity status among peers, while racial bullying was associated with prejudice but not peer status. The relevance of anti-immigrant prejudices in driving racial bullying emerged also from adolescents interviews. The qualitative data indicated that among the reasons for bullying, adolescents mentioned a desire for dominance and popularity, in particular when the victim was non-immigrant. Findings suggest that, in addition to individual and peer group-related risk factors, prejudice also needs to be addressed in anti-bullying interventions aimed to counteract racial bullying.

  • 9.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Factors influencing child witnesses2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 197-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study elucidates how professional intervention can influence children's abilities to report accurately about abuse experiences. Based on knowledge acquired through previous research and the present case study, the study shows how methods of information acquisition used during preliminary investigations can negatively affect child reports. The case study emanates from a larger study of 193 allegedly sexually abused children. Examination of these police interviews shows that 55 children were interviewed more than once and their reports were exposed to possible professional influences before and during the preliminary investigation. The case study reveals the inadequate management of a child witness. The findings indicate that police officers and psychologists should avoid suggestive interventions and co-ordinate their efforts during the preliminary investigation in order to safeguard the children's as well as the suspects' legal interests. This paper points out the need for implementing interview interventions that can enhance children's abilities to report accurately about abuse experiences.

  • 10.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Developmental Psychology.
    The hidden meanings of metaphors in family therapy2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 217-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates how two therapists' beliefs and practices influence the therapeutic process when they organize social interaction according to a metaphor of a royal family. The therapeutic process is described through the case of a boy called Pelle. He comes to therapy together with his family. It is shown how the therapists collaborate in the process of implementing the worldview of the predefined normative standard for family life. In the short term the therapists' use of the metaphor can be seen as an intervention to accomplish immediate change in a non-threatening way. In the long term the cost of using the metaphor was that the mother got a confirmation about herself as a less powerful parent and the child got an image of being a failure. This study points out that metaphors as therapeutic tools have to be analyzed critically before they are used or more specifically the therapists have to examine what kind of values and meanings are hidden in the metaphor and who will gain and loose if it is used as an intervention.

  • 11.
    Dahlgren, Lars-Ove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Dahlgren, Lars-Ove
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Marton, F.
    Marton, F.
    On non-verbatim learning. III: The outcome space of some basic concepts in economics.1976In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 17, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Levén, Anna
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Jan
    The Swedish Defence Research Agency, Linköping, Sweden .
    Andersson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The face you recognize may not be the one you saw: Memory conjunction errors in individuals with or without learning disability2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 177-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Memory conjunction errors, that is, when a combination of two previously presented stimuli is erroneously recognized as previously having been seen, were investigated in a face recognition task with drawings and photographs in 23 individuals with learning disability, and 18 chronologically age-matched controls without learning disability. Compared to the controls, individuals with learning disability committed significantly more conjunction errors, feature errors (one old and one new component), but had lower correct recognition, when the results were adjusted for different guessing levels. A dual-processing approach gained more support than a binding approach. However, neither of the approaches could explain all of the results. The results of the learning disability group were only partly related to non-verbal intelligence.

  • 13. Dubuc, S.
    et al.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Lalonde, R.
    Department of Psychology, Rouen University, France.
    Determinants of capacious memory: A process-dissociation and experiential approach2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 217-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to delineate some important circumstances where exceptionally good memory performance, or capacious memory occurs. A further aim is to study memory processes involved in this memory phenomenon. In a first experiment, participants looked through two series of pictures differing in number and were evaluated in two-alternative forced-choice and yes-no recognition memory tasks combined in a process-dissociation procedure. Moreover, participants were asked to provide remember and know responses to tap recollective experience. The results as to forced-choice recognition task accuracy and according to process-dissociation procedure estimates were replicated in a second experiment with a more intrinsic contextual manipulation, and in a third, forgetting experiment. In addition to replicating previous findings, the results show (a) that capacious memory is associated with strong feelings of recollection, and (b) that familiarity (in terms of the process-dissociation framework) contributes to this phenomenon. © 2005 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 14.
    Eisele, P
    Univ Lund, Dept Psychol, S-22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Post-decision consolidation: Group members in different social settings compared to individual decision makers2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 275-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two experiments were conducted to examine how making decisions in a 3-member group affects the degree of post-decision consolidation, defined as attractiveness changes in favor of the chosen alternative. Both experiments were conducted in two sessions one week apart. In the first session (decision phase), participants estimated the importance of each of four different attributes describing two decision alternatives. They were then shown predetermined attractiveness ratings on each of the attributes and were to decide on the two alternatives, either individually or as a group. In the second session (post-decision phase), the participants were to attempt to recall the attractiveness ratings for the attributes as presented to them in session one. In both experiments, significant post-decision consolidation was found for individual decision makers but not for group members. In experiment 2, this result was replicated, no difference in consolidation being found between group members with face-to-face interaction and without.

  • 15.
    Elwér, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Byrne, Brian
    University of New England, Australia.
    Olson, Richard K.
    University of Colorado, CO 80309 USA.
    Keenan, Janice M.
    University of Denver, CO 80208 USA.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    A retrospective longitudinal study of cognitive and language skills in poor reading comprehension2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 157-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifty-six specific poor reading comprehenders (SPRC) were selected in Grade 4 and retrospectively compared to good comprehenders at preschool (age 5) and at the end of kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 2. The results revealed deficits in vocabulary, grammar, verbal memory and early deficits in phonological awareness in most of the SPRC sample, beginning in preschool. The reading comprehension deficits in children with SPRC were not as marked in earlier assessments in Grade 1 and 2, probably because of the greater dependence on word decoding in reading comprehension in the early grades.

  • 16.
    Frankl, My
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm Centre Dependency Disorders, Sweden.
    Philips, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm Centre Dependency Disorders, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Berggraf, Lene
    Research Institute, Norway.
    Ulvenes, Pal
    Research Institute, Norway.
    Johansson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Psychometric properties of the Affect Phobia Test2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 57, no 5, p. 482-488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to make the first evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Affect Phobia Test, using the Swedish translation - a test developed to screen the ability to experience, express and regulate emotions. Data was collected from a clinical sample (N=82) of patients with depression and/or anxiety participating in randomized controlled trial of Internet-based affect-focused treatment, and a university student sample (N=197). The internal consistency for the total score was satisfactory (Clinical sample =0.88/Student sample =0.84) as well as for all the affective domains, except Anger/Assertion (=0.44/0.36), Sadness/Grief (=0.24/0.46) and Attachment/Closeness (=0.67/0.69). Test retest reliability was satisfactory (ICCamp;gt;0.77) for the total score and for all the affective domains except for Sadness/Grief (ICC=0.04). The exploratory factor analysis resulted in a six-factor solution and did only moderately match the tests original affective domains. An empirical cut-off between the clinical and the university student sample were calculated and yielded a cut-off of 72 points. As expected, the Affect Phobia test showed negative significant correlations in the clinical group with measures on depression (r(xy)=-0.229; pamp;lt;0.01) and anxiety (r(xy)=-0.315; pamp;lt;0.05). The conclusion is that the psychometric properties are satisfactory for the total score of the Affect Phobia Test but not for some of the tests affective domains. Consequently the domains should not be used as subscales. The test can discriminate between individuals who seek help for psychological problems and those who do not.

  • 17. Gillström, Å.
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Prediction accuracy of text recall: Ease, effort, and familiarity.1994In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 35, p. 367-386Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Intelligence and dyslexia: Implications for diagnosis and intervention1999In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 127-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we critically examine theoretical issues and practical consequences of including IQ in the definition of dyslexia. According to the discrepancy criterion individuals are classified as dyslexic if their reading skills are below what would be expected from their IQ scores. However, we argue that intelligence is a fuzzy concept and that there is no clear causal relationship between intelligence level and word decoding skills. Also, high and low IQ poor readers show the same reading performance patterns, indicating that both groups might benefit from the same remedial activities. Evidence for the critical role of phonological skills in dyslexia is presented and a more recent definition of dyslexia is discussed in relation to these findings. Finally, two alternative, more outcome-based classifications of poor readers are suggested and some critical consequences for individual interventions are outlined.

  • 19.
    Heimann, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Herbert, Jane S
    Depart,emt of Psychology, University of Sheffield.
    Tjus, Tomas
    Psykologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Recent advances in early memory development: Research on typical and atypical children2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 1-3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Heimann, Mikael
    et al.
    Pennsylvania State University.
    Nelson, Keith E
    Pennsylvania State University.
    Schaller, Joseph
    Götebors Universitet.
    Neonatal imitation of tongue protrusion and mouth opening: Methodological aspects and evidence of early individual differences1989In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 90-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present work examines imitation of mouth opening and tongue protrusion in 32 full-terminfants at three different occasions: When the infants are two to three days, three weeks. and three months old. The analysis focuses (1) on individual differences in imitative behaviour and (2) on how to operationalize the infants' responses. The overall group analysis revealed that imitation of tongue protrusion was statistically significant for both two- to three-day-old and three-week-old infants but not when the children had become three months old. Nostatistically significant effect was observed for imitation of mouth opening. Two differentimitation indexes were constructed in order to assess individual differences in early imitativebehaviour. Results show that short-term stability in imitative tendencies cxists between thefirst and second observation. The results further reveal that methodological factors must beseriously considered when studying neonatal imitation: the overall imitation found for tongueprotrusion is demonstrated to be dependent on how the infants' responses are coded.

  • 21.
    Heimann, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nordqvist, Emelie
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Institutionen för psykologi, Lunds universitet.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Institutionen för psykologi, Lunds universitet.
    Associative learning measured with ERP predicts deferred imitation using a strict observation only design in 14 to 15 month old children2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 33-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deferred imitation is an established procedure for behavioural measurement of early declarative-like memories in infancy and previous work has indicated a link between this type of memory and brain potentials in infants. The present study compared infants’ memory performance in this paradigm with electrophysiological indices of associative learning. Thirty children (mean age: 14.5 months) participated, of which 15 (9 boys) had acceptable ERP recordings that could be included in the final analysis. Deferred imitation was measured with an observation-only procedure using three actions and a 30 min delay. ERP was recorded with a High Density Net (128 electrodes) during associative learning. Change scores based on Nc, a middle latency component associated with attentional processes, predicted deferred imitation performance. Thus, associative learning measured with ERP predicts deferred imitation using a strict observation only design in 14 to15 month old children.

  • 22.
    Johansen Lundervold, Astri
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Norway .
    Beate Walhovd, Kristine
    University of Oslo, Norway .
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sundet, Kjetil
    University of Oslo, Norway .
    Editorial Material: New perspectives in neuropsychology2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 187-188Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 23. Johansson, K.
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Speech gestures and facial expression in speechreading.1996In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 37, p. 132-139Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24. Johansson, K.
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    The role of emotionality and typicality in speechreading1995In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 36, p. 189-200Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Johansson, L.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Ghaderi, A.
    Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Emotional Stroop via Internet among individuals with eating disorders: Personality and social sciences2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 69-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated whether Stroop interference in eating disordered individuals for food - and body-related words, as repeatedly found previously using standard emotional Stroop tasks, would also be demonstrated when using an Internet based emotional Stroop task. Participants were anorexic women (n = 13), bulimic women (n = 20), non-clinically eating disordered women nevertheless over-concerned about eating and body appearance (n = 27) and normal control women (n = 31). Bulimic individuals showed Stroop interference for body-related words whereas anorexic individuals showed Stroop interference for food-related words. The present results thus suggest that administration of the emotional Stroop task is possible via the Internet. Furthermore, it is possible that the time consuming response delivery, relative to previous studies, could lead to Stroop interference only for the most emotionally significant information, in turn, differentiating between the core concerns of anorexic and bulimic individuals. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations.

  • 26. Johansson, Olof
    et al.
    Andersson, J
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Compensating strategies in collaborative remembering in very old couples2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 349-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates collaborative memory performance in very old married couples working in two types of participant constellations, and with two types of memory tasks, i.e. working as couples, or as individuals in episodic or semantic memory tasks. Sixty-two old married couples were a priori classified as high or low on two dimensions suggested to be important for successful collaboration, i.e. responsibility (how division of responsibility was organized) and agreement (how they mutually agreed on each other's view). The episodic memory task was immediate recall of short stories. The semantic memory tasks were to answer questions about names, places, and concepts. The results suggested that: (1) groups outperformed a single individual, but (2) groups in general suffered from collaboration relative to the predicted potential in episodic tasks only, thus replicating earlier results. Nevertheless, (3) the couples scoring high on division of responsibility achieved the same productivity as nominal pairs (i.e. the predicted potential), (4) the couples scoring high on the agreement dimension showed that they were not as affected by collaboration, but then performed less well in "absolute" performance. Finally, the results were discussed in terms of optimal compensation strategies, especially for elderly couples. © 2005 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 27.
    Jungert, Tomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Träff, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Contrasting two models of academic self-efficacy - domain-specific versus cross-domain - in children receiving and not receiving special instruction in mathematics2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 440-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In social cognitive theory, self-efficacy is domain-specific. An alternative model, the cross-domain influence model, would predict that self-efficacy beliefs in one domain might influence performance in other domains. Research has also found that children who receive special instruction are not good at estimating their performance. The aim was to test two models of how self-efficacy beliefs influence achievement, and to contrast children receiving special instruction in mathematics with normally-achieving children. The participants were 73 fifth-grade children who receive special instruction and 70 children who do not receive any special instruction. In year four and five, the childrens skills in mathematics and reading were assessed by national curriculum tests, and in their fifth year, self-efficacy in mathematics and reading were measured. Structural equation modeling showed that in domains where children do not receive special instruction in mathematics, self-efficacy is a mediating variable between earlier and later achievement in the same domain. Achievement in mathematics was not mediated by self-efficacy in mathematics for children who receive special instruction. For normal achieving children, earlier achievement in the language domain had an influence on later self-efficacy in the mathematics domain, and self-efficacy beliefs in different domains were correlated. Self-efficacy is mostly domain specific, but may play a different role in academic performance depending on whether children receive special instruction. The results of the present study provided some support of the Cross-Domain Influence Model for normal achieving children.

  • 28.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Adolfsson, R.
    Borjesson, A.
    Nilsson, L.G.
    Primed word-fragment completion and successive memory test performance in normal aging2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 355-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Young and old subjects were investigated to examine whether: the effects of priming are influenced by aging there is independence between primed word-fragment completion and recognition performances, and the dependence between different tests is influenced by aging. A successive test paradigm was employed involving repeated assessment of to-be-remembered words by means of recognition and primed word-fragment completion. The results show that implicit memory declines with increasing age, and that correlations between different memory tests decrease with age. The outcome suggests that age-related memory decline involves several forms of memory, including primed word-fragment completion, and is reflected in correlations between measures of implicit and explicit memory.

  • 29.
    Kempe, Camilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    A longitudinal study of early reading difficulties and subsequent problem behaviors2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 242-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is generally believed that early academic failure in school develops into a downward spiral of negative motivational and behavioral consequences. In this study, children with reading difficulties were compared with typical readers on questionnaires measuring ADHD symptoms and other behavior problems such as withdrawn symptoms, somatic complaints, anxiety/depression, social problems, and aggression. The results revealed that reading difficulties and problem behaviors appear more independent of each other rather than problem behaviors being a consequence of reading failure. In addition, gender differenceswere negligible when examining the relationship between reading difficulties and subsequent problem behavior. Some implications for special educationand intervention are suggested.

  • 30. L., Adamson
    et al.
    S.G., Hartman
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Adolescent identity - a qualitative approach: Self-concept, existential questions and adult contacts1999In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 40, p. 21-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Lech, Börje
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Holmqvist , Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Consciousness about own and others affects: A study of the validity of a revised version of the Affect Consciousness Interview2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 515-521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consciousness about own and others affects: A study of the validity of a revised version of the Affect Consciousness Interview.

    This study presents a modified version of the affect consciousness interview (Monsen, Eilertsen, Melgard & Odegard, 1996), intended to capture the individuals affective consciousness. The aim of the modified version - The Affect Consciousness Interview - Revised (ACI-R) - is to measure consciousness about own and others affects. Three groups of patients (with eating disorder, relational and social problems or stress-related problems), and one non-clinical group were included in the study (N = 95). The results indicated that it was possible to achieve adequate interrater reliability, that the scores correlated meaningfully with other measures of mental functioning, and that the interview discriminated between different clinical groups and non-clinical participants. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that the ACI-R is a promising instrument and that it should be explored further in order to study the organization of self-experiences and the ability to be emotionally present in interactions with others.

  • 32.
    Lidestam, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Beskow, Jonas
    TMH KTH.
    Motivation and appraisal in perception of poorly specified speech2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 93-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Normal-hearing students (n=72) performed sentence, consonant, and word identification in either A (auditory), V (visual), or AV (audiovisual) modality. The auditory signal had difficult speech-to-noise relations. Talker (human vs. synthetic), topic (no cue vs. cue-words), and emotion (no cue vs. facially displayed vs. cue-words) were varied within groups. After the first block, effects of modality, face, topic, and emotion on initial appraisal and motivation were assessed. After the entire session, effects of modality on longer-term appraisal and motivation were assessed. The results from both assessments showed that V identification was more positively appraised than A identification. Correlations were tentatively interpreted such that evaluation of self-rated performance possibly depends on subjective standard and is reflected on motivation (if below subjective standard, AV group), or on appraisal (if above subjective standard, A group). Suggestions for further research are presented. © 2006 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 33.
    Lindner, Philip
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden.
    Miloff, Alexander
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Reuterskiold, Lena
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    What is so frightening about spiders? Self-rated and self-disclosed impact of different characteristics and associations with phobia symptoms2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 60, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spider phobia is a common and impairing mental disorder, yet little is known about what characteristics of spiders that spider phobic individuals find frightening. Using screening data from a clinical trial, we explored which characteristics that spider-fearful individuals (n=194) rated as having the greatest impact on fear, used factor analysis to group specific characteristics, and explored linear associations with self-reported phobia symptoms. Second, a guided text-mining approach was used to extract the most common words in free-text responses to the question: What is it about spiders that you find frightening? Both analysis types suggested that movement-related characteristics of spiders were the most important, followed by appearance characteristics. There were, however, no linear associations with degree of phobia symptoms. Our findings reveal the importance of targeting movement-related fears in in-vivo exposure therapy for spider phobia and using realistically animated spider stimuli in computer-based experimental paradigms and clinical interventions such as Virtual Reality exposure therapy.

  • 34.
    Lundberg, C.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden, Huddinge University Hospital, Traffic Medicine Centre, SE-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Caneman, G.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, S.-M.
    Samuelsson, S.-M..
    Hakamies-Blomqvist, L.
    Almkvist, O.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The assessment of fitness to drive after a stroke: The Nordic Stroke Driver Screening Assessment2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 23-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The British Stroke Driver Screening Assessment (SDSA) is a set of four simple cognitive tests to evaluate driving fitness in stroke patients. To evaluate its usefulness in a Scandinavian context, we adapted the tests and assessed a group of 97 stroke patients from Sweden and Norway, using a driving test as the criterion. When results were calculated according to the original method, based on a discriminant function, less than 70% of the participants were correctly classified. To improve the predictive potential, a new discriminant analysis was performed, using the scores of a subsample of 49 patients, and validated on the remaining 48 participants. In total, 78% of the patients were correctly classified, but specificity was superior to sensitivity. We conclude that the Nordic version of the SDSA is a useful instrument, provided that test scores are interpreted in a balanced manner, taking into account the possibility of compensatory traffic behavior.

  • 35.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon A/S, Research Centre Eriksholm, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cognition and hearing aids.2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 395-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The perceptual information transmitted from a damaged cochlea to the brain is more poorly specified than information from an intact cochlea and requires more processing in working memory before language content can be decoded. In addition to making sounds audible, current hearing aids include several technologies that are intended to facilitate language understanding for persons with hearing impairment in challenging listening situations. These include directional microphones, noise reduction, and fast-acting amplitude compression systems. However, the processed signal itself may challenge listening to the extent that with specific types of technology, and in certain listening situations, individual differences in cognitive processing resources may determine listening success. Here, current and developing digital hearing aid signal processing schemes are reviewed in the light of individual working memory (WM) differences. It is argued that signal processing designed to improve speech understanding may have both positive and negative consequences, and that these may depend on individual WM capacity.

  • 36.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Skilled speechreading: A single-case study1994In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 35, p. 212-219Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Visual speech processing: Word decoding and word discrimination related to sentence-based speechreading and hearing-impairment.1991In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 32Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Löfkvist, Ulrika
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almkvist, Ove
    Stockholm University, Sweden and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Tallberg, Ing-Mari
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Word fluency performance and strategies in children with cochlear implants: age-dependent effects?2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 467-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lofkvist, U., Almkvist, O., Lyxell, B. andamp; Tallberg, I.-M. (2012). Word fluency performance and strategies in children with cochlear implants: age-dependent effects? Scandinavian Journal of Psychology 53, 467-474. Word fluency was examined in 73 Swedish children aged 69 years divided into two age groups, 67 and 89 years; 34 deaf children with cochlear implants (CI) (15 girls/19 boys) and 39 age-matched children with normal hearing (NH) (20 girls/19 boys). One purpose was to compare the ability to retrieve words in two different word fluency tasks; one phonemically based (FAS letter fluency) and one semantically based (animal fluency). A second purpose was to examine retrieval strategies in the two tasks by conducting an analysis of clustering and switching of word sequences. In general we found that age was an important factor for word fluency ability, in both the CI and the NH groups. It was also demonstrated that children with CI aged 89 years retrieved significantly fewer words and used less efficient strategies in the retrieval process, especially on the phonemically based task compared to children with NH of the same ages, whereas children 67 years performed similarly in both groups regarding number of retrieved words and use of strategies. The results are discussed with respect to factors such as age differences in performance for children with CI, especially for the phonemically based task.

  • 39.
    Maroti, Daniel
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Molander, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet and Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Differences in alexithymia and emotional awareness in exhaustion syndrome and chronic fatigue syndrome2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 52-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Symptoms of Exhaustion Syndrome (ES) and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) are overlapping and create difficulties of differential diagnosis. Empirical studies comparing ES and CFS are scarce. This study aims to investigate if there are any emotional differences between ES and CFS. This cross-sectional study compared self-reported alexithymia and observer-rated emotional awareness in patients with ES (n = 31), CFS (n = 38) and healthy controls (HC) (n = 30). Self-reported alexithymia was measured with the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 (TAS-20) and emotional awareness with an observer-rated performance test, the Level of Emotional Awareness Scale (LEAS). Additionally, depression and anxiety were scored by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Results show that patients with ES expressed higher self-reported alexithymia in the TAS-20 compared to HC, but had similar emotional awareness capacity in the observer-rated performance test, the LEAS. Patients with CFS expressed more difficulties in identifying emotions compared to HCs, and performed significantly worse in the LEAS-total and spent more time completing the LEAS as compared to HC. Correlation and multiple regressions analyses revealed that depression and anxiety positively correlated with and explained part of the variances in alexithymia scores, while age and group explained the major part of the variance in LEAS. Findings of this study indicate that emotional status is different in patients with ES and CFS with respect to both self-reported alexithymia and observer-rated emotional awareness. Emotional parameters should be approached both in clinical investigation and psychotherapy for patients with ES and CFS.

  • 40.
    Marsh, John E.
    et al.
    University of Central Lancashire, England; University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Crawford, Jessica C.
    University of Central Lancashire, England.
    Pilgrim, Lea K.
    University of Central Lancashire, England.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Hughes, Robert W.
    Royal Holloway University of London, England.
    Trouble articulating the right words: Evidence for a response-exclusion account of distraction during semantic fluency2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 58, no 5, p. 367-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is widely held that single-word lexical access is a competitive process, a view based largely on the observation that naming a picture is slowed in the presence of a distractor-word. However, problematic for this view is that a low-frequency distractor-word slows the naming of a picture more than does a high-frequency word. This supports an alternative, response-exclusion, account in which a distractor-word interferes because it must be excluded from an articulatory output buffer before the right word can be articulated (the picture name): A high, compared to low, frequency word accesses the buffer more quickly and, as such, can also be excluded more quickly. Here we studied the respective roles of competition and response-exclusion for the first time in the context of semantic verbal fluency, a setting requiring the accessing of, and production of, multiple words from long-term memory in response to a single semantic cue. We show that disruption to semantic fluency by a sequence of to-be-ignored spoken distractors is also greater when those distractors are low in frequency, thereby extending the explanatory compass of the response-exclusion account to a multiple-word production setting and casting further doubt on the lexical-selection-by-competition view. The results can be understood as reflecting the contribution of speech output processes to semantic fluency.

  • 41.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Ors, Marianne
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Rosenlunds sjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach for children using cochlear implants or hearing aids2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 448-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach for deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children in Sweden using cochlear implants or hearing aids, or a combination of both. The study included forty-eight children, 5, 6 and 7 years of age. Sixteen children with normal hearing (NH) served as a reference group. The first purpose of the study was to compare NH and DHH children’s reading ability at pre and post intervention. The second purpose was to investigate effects of the intervention. Cognitive and demographic factors were analyzed in relation to reading improvement. Results showed no statistically significant difference for reading ability at the group level, although NH children showed overall higher reading scores at both test points. Age comparisons revealed a statistically significant higher reading ability in the NH 7-year olds compared to the DHH 7-year olds. The intervention proved successful for word decoding accuracy, passage comprehension and as a reduction of nonword decoding errors in both NH and DHH children. Reading improvement was associated with complex working memory and phonological processing skills in NH children. Correspondent associations were observed with visual working memory and letter knowledge in the DHH children. Age was the only demographic factor that was significantly correlated with reading improvement. The results suggest that DHH children’s beginning reading may be influenced by visual strategies that might explain the reading delay in the older children.

  • 42.
    Parris, Leandra
    et al.
    Illinois State Univ, IL 61790 USA.
    Jungert, Tomas
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Varjas, Kris
    Georgia State Univ, GA 30303 USA.
    Meyers, Joel
    Georgia State Univ, GA 30303 USA.
    Grunewald, Stephanie
    Restorat Counseling, IL USA.
    Shriberg, David
    Indiana Univ, IN USA.
    Bullying bystander behaviors: The role of coping effectiveness and the moderating effect of gender2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers have suggested that bystander behaviors and victim coping play an important role in counteracting the negative effects of bullying. The current study investigated the relationship between students ratings of coping effectiveness when addressing bullying and their behaviors as bystanders when witnessing bullying. Surveys were administered in a Midwestern, suburban school district. Some associations between perceptions of coping effectiveness and bystander behavior supported our hypotheses (e.g., constructive coping associated with defending bystander behaviors, externalizing associated with pro-bullying behaviors). However, some findings did not support hypothesized relationships. For example, higher ratings of effectiveness for cognitive distancing as a coping strategy were associated with increased defending behaviors as a bystander. Gender moderated some of these relationships. Pro-bullying bystander behavior was associated with increased ratings of cognitive distancing and decreased reports of constructive coping effectiveness for girls. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.

  • 43.
    Rosander, Michael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stiwne, Dan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Granström, Kjell
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Bipolar groupthink: Assessing groupthink tendencies in authentic work groups1998In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 10, p. 10-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    A framework for reproductive memory tasks.1983In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 24, p. 45-56Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cognitive ability and communicative disability.1998In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 39, p. 125-129Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cognitive Psychology in Scandinavia: Attention, memory, learning and memory dysfunction (Review)1986In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 27, p. 95-149Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Editorial2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 367-369Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Editorial statement2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 91-92Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    On the distinction between perception and cognition.1990In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 31, p. 154-156Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    On the tracing of auditory and visual support systems for remembering.1982In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 23, p. 113-117Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf