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  • 1.
    Beukes, E. W.
    et al.
    Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA; Audiology India, Mysore, India; Department of Speech and Hearing, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University, Karnataka, India.
    Valien, T. E.
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA.
    Baguley, D. M.
    Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK; National Institute for Health Research, Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, Ropewalk House, The Ropewalk, Nottingham, UK; Otology and Hearing Group, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
    Allen, P. M.
    Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK; Vision and Eye Research Unit, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Positive experiences related to living with tinnitus: A cross-sectional survey2018In: Clinical Otolaryngology, ISSN 1749-4478, E-ISSN 1365-2273, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 489-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The aim of this study was to gain insights related to positive experiences reported by adults with tinnitus living in the United Kingdom.

    Design

    A cross‐sectional survey design was used in a sample of adults with tinnitus who were interested in undertaking an Internet‐based intervention for tinnitus.

    Setting

    The study was UK wide and data collection was online.

    Participants

    Participants consisted of 240 adults (137 males, 103 females), with an average age of 48.16 years and average tinnitus duration of 11.52 years (SD: 11.88).

    Main outcome measures

    Tinnitus severity was measured by means of the Tinnitus Functional Index. To evaluate the secondary effects of tinnitus, the Insomnia Severity Index, the Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults‐Screening Version and the Cognitive Failures Questionnaires were administered. Positive experiences related to tinnitus were explored using an open‐ended question format.

    Results

    Around a third of participants (32.5%) reported positive experiences associated with tinnitus. The number of positive responses ranged from one to eight responses per participant, although there were fewer participants with more than one positive response. The predominant themes concerned for (i) coping; (ii) personal development; (iii) support, and to a lesser extent (iv) outlook. Younger participants, those with a lower hearing disability and those with fewer cognitive failures were more likely to report positive experiences associated with having tinnitus.

    Conclusions

    This study has identified that personal development and a positive outlook are possible despite experiencing tinnitus. Ways to facilitate positive experiences related to tinnitus should be promoted, as these may reduce the negative consequences associated with tinnitus. The most prevalent positive theme was the ability to cope with tinnitus. Positive experiences were also drawn from having clinical and other support networks. This highlights the importance of providing tinnitus interventions that can assist people in coping with tinnitus, particularly to those less likely to relate tinnitus to any positive experiences. Those most likely to be helped include those who are older with greater cognitive difficulties and a greater hearing disability.

  • 2.
    Durisala, N.
    et al.
    Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya Kumar Channapatna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Granberg, S.
    Örebro University, Sweden; Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Moeller, K.
    Örebro University, Sweden; Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Determination and classification of the problems experienced by adults with single-sided deafness using ICF classification: an exploratory study using 26 participants2017In: Clinical Otolaryngology, ISSN 1749-4478, E-ISSN 1365-2273, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 748-752Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 3.
    Hessen Soderman, A.-C.
    et al.
    Aleris Sabbatsberg, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Odhagen, E.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ericsson, E.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Hemlin, C.
    Sollentuna Specialist Clin, Sweden.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sunnergren, O.
    Ryhov County Hospital and Futurum, Sweden.
    Stalfors, J.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage rates are related to technique for dissection and for haemostasis. An analysis of 15734 patients in the National Tonsil Surgery Register in Sweden2015In: Clinical Otolaryngology, ISSN 1749-4478, E-ISSN 1365-2273, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 248-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesTo analyse post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage (PTH) rates related to technique for dissection and haemostasis. Study DesignRegister study from the National Tonsil Surgery Register in Sweden (NTSRS). MethodsAll patients, subjected to tonsillectomy (TE) without adenoidectomy from 1 March 2009 to 26 April 2013, were included in the study. The surgeon reports data about technique and early PTH, while late PTH is reported by the patient in a questionnaire 30days after surgery. Results15734 patients with complete data concerning technique for dissection and for haemostasis were identified in the NTSRS. Techniques used were cold steel dissection with uni- or bipolar diathermy haemostasis (65.3%), diathermy scissors (15.7%), coblation (9.1%), cold steel dissection with cold haemostasis (7.4%) and ultrascision (2.5%). Early and late PTH were reported in 3.2% and 9.4% of the cases, respectively, and return to theatre (RTT) in 2.7%. The rates for PTH and RTT related to technique were analysed. Compared with cold dissection+ cold haemostasis, late PTH rate was 2.8 times higher after cold dissection + hot haemostasis, 3.2 times higher after coblation, 4.3 times higher after diathermy scissors and 5.6 times higher after ultrascision. The risk for RTT was higher for all hot techniques except for coblation, while ultrascision resulted in a lower risk for early PTH. ConclusionsAll hot techniques resulted in a higher risk for late PTH compared with cold steel dissection +cold haemostasis. The risk for RTT was higher for all hot techniques except for coblation, while ultrascision resulted in a lower risk for early PTH. An early PTH was associated with an increased risk for late PTH.

  • 4.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Role of self-reported hearing disability and measured hearing sensitivity in understanding participation restrictions and health-related quality of life: a study with hundred and three older adults with hearing loss2017In: Clinical Otolaryngology, ISSN 1749-4478, E-ISSN 1365-2273, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 924-926Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 5.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    et al.
    Swansea University, UK.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Meredith, Rhys
    Singleton Hospital, ABM University Health Board, Swansea, UK.
    The patient journey of adults with hearing impairment: the patients’ views2011In: Clinical Otolaryngology, ISSN 1749-4478, E-ISSN 1365-2273, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 227-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:  The term ‘patient journey’ refers to the experiences and processes the patient goes through during the course of a disease and its treatment. The study explores the perspectives of adults with acquired hearing impairment and to further develop the patient journey template based on the Ida model. Design:  Qualitative approach using thematic analysis and process mapping. Setting:  Support groups of people with hearing impairment. Participants:  Thirty-two adults with acquired hearing impairment from two hearing impaired groups in Wales. All were hearing aid users. Main outcome measure:  Participants worked in small groups to describe their experiences through hearing loss. These data were used to develop a template of the patients’ perspective of the journey. This was then compared with the perspective of professionals, and a ‘patient journey template for adults with acquired hearing impairment’ was developed. Results:  This template identifies seven main phases as follows: (i) pre-awareness; (ii) awareness; (iii) movement; (iv) diagnostics; (v) rehabilitation; (vi) self-evaluation; and (vii) resolution. The study identified a number of new components. The self-evaluation component was not defined by professionals and reflects the need for patients to consider the costs, benefits and alternatives to the approach provided by audiologists. It is important for audiologists to be aware of this. Conclusion:  The study highlighted the differences and commonalities in perspectives of professionals and patients. Use of the patient journey can help clinicians to understand the unique experiences their patients go through help them to develop patient-centred treatment.

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