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  • 1.
    Ahmed, Ali
    Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study, Uppsala University, Sweden and Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Women are not always less competitive than men: evidence from Come Dine with Me2011In: Applied Economics Letters, ISSN 1350-4851, E-ISSN 1466-4291, Vol. 18, no 12, p. 1099-1101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Are women less competitive than men? Many experimental and nonexperimental studies have documented gender differences in competitiveness. This article presents the results from a study that examines gender differences in competitiveness in the television show Come Dine with Me. It is a cooking show in which amateur chefs compete against each other for a cash prize. The show provides an unusual opportunity to study gender differences in a high-stakes game environment. The results demonstrate that there are no gender differences in competitiveness.

  • 2.
    Ahmed, Ali
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden and Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, Lina
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Hammarstedt, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Does age matter for employability? A field experiment on ageism in the Swedish labor market2012In: Applied Economics Letters, ISSN 1350-4851, E-ISSN 1466-4291, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 403-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the findings of the first field experiment on age discrimination in the Swedish labour market. Pairs of matched applications, one from a fictitious 31-year-old male applicant and one from a fictitious 46-year-old male applicant, were sent to employers with job openings for restaurant workers and sales assistants. Employers' responses to the applicants were then recorded. The experimental data provide clear and strong evidence of significant ageism in the Swedish labour market. On average, the younger applicant received over 3 times more responses from employers looking to hire a restaurant worker and over 4 times more responses from employers looking to hire a sales assistant than the older applicant. Therefore, the older applicant received significantly fewer invitations for interviews and job offers than the younger applicant in both occupations examined.

  • 3.
    Ahmed, Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Granberg, Mark
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics.
    Lång, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Does having ones own place to live make someone more employable?2017In: Applied Economics Letters, ISSN 1350-4851, E-ISSN 1466-4291, Vol. 24, no 18, p. 1327-1330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article encapsulates the findings of a randomized correspondence test field experiment investigating whether job candidates home status influences their employability. More than 2000 employers with vacancies in the Swedish labour market received a job application from a fictitious candidate. A job candidates home status (his or her own place to live or temporary housing with a friend) was randomized across employers. Results show that home status indeed affected the number of positive employer responses received by job candidates, mainly in low-skilled occupations. Not having a place to live at the time of the application proved a disadvantage when applying for positions within but an advantage when applying for positions outside the city of residence at the time of the application.

  • 4.
    Ahmed, Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hammarstedt, Mats
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Res Inst Ind Econ IFN Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ethnic discrimination in contacts with public authorities: a correspondence test among swedish municipalities2020In: Applied Economics Letters, ISSN 1350-4851, E-ISSN 1466-4291, Vol. 27, no 17, p. 1391-1394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a field experiment conducted in order to explore the existence of ethnic discrimination in contact with public authorities. Two fictitious parents, one with a Swedish-sounding name and one with an Arabic-sounding name, sent email inquiries to all Swedish municipalities asking for information about preschool admission for their children. Results show that the parents were treated differently by the municipalities since the individual with the Swedish-sounding name received significantly more responses that answered the question in the inquiry than the individual with the Arabic-sounding name. Also, the individual with the Swedish-sounding name received more warm answers than the individual with the Arabic-sounding name in the sense that the answer from the municipality started with a personal salutation. We conclude that ethnic discrimination is prevalent in public sector contacts and that this discrimination has implications for the integration of immigrants and their children.

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  • 5.
    Bandick, Roger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Koch, Michael
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Domestic and foreign acquisitions, plant survival and employment effects2023In: Applied Economics Letters, ISSN 1350-4851, E-ISSN 1466-4291, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 923-926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We estimate causal treatment effects of domestic and foreign acquisitions on plant survival, employment (growth) and the skill composition within acquired plants. To do so, we look at takeovers of private firms in Danish manufacturing and service sectors during the period 2002-2015. We use plant-, firm-, and industry-level information to control for the non-random selection of the acquisition targets, differentiated for domestic and foreign acquirers, by combining a difference-in-differences approach with a propensity score weighting estimator. Our results reveal positive effects on plant survival, employment (growth) and the skill intensity for domestic targets, while foreign targets reduce their skill intensity following an acquisition.

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  • 6.
    Nguyen, Hoang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics.
    Nguyen, Trong-Nghia
    Discipline of Business Analytics, The University of Sydney Business School and ACEMS, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Tran, Minh-Ngoc
    Discipline of Business Analytics, The University of Sydney Business School and ACEMS, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    A dynamic leverage stochastic volatility model2021In: Applied Economics Letters, ISSN 1350-4851, E-ISSN 1466-4291, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 97-102Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 7.
    Nguyen, Hoang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Osterholm, Par
    Orebro Univ, Sweden; Natl Inst Econ Res, Sweden; Univ Sydney, Australia.
    A note on the dynamic effects of supply and demand shocks in the crude oil market2024In: Applied Economics Letters, ISSN 1350-4851, E-ISSN 1466-4291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we investigate whether key relations in the crude oil market have been stable over time. This is done by estimating hybrid time-varying parameter structural Bayesian VAR models using monthly data ranging from February 1973 to May 2023. Model selection suggests that while stochastic volatility is preferred over homoscedasticity, the dynamics of the model are best described by constant parameters in all equations.

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