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  • 1.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Informal Recruitment Methods and Disadvantages of Immigrants in the Swedish Labour Market2008In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 411-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the probability of success for different methods of finding employment in the Swedish labour market, in times of both economic growth and decline. Existing West European studies on hiring processes have not allowed researchers to examine the relationship between job contacts and wage income among various groups of immigrants. Since our dataset is sufficiently large, this article examines job-finding strategies and labour market outcomes for individuals within two large groups, immigrants and natives. By studying those who have been in their current jobs for one year or less, the paper investigates to what extent both natives and immigrants use their social networks to find a job, and how informal job-finding methods are related to the rate of return in the Swedish labour market for the job secured, in terms of hourly wage. The findings show that immigrants, compared to natives, are less likely to be able to find jobs through informal methods and that jobs found through informal methods do not pay as well for immigrants as for natives.

  • 2.
    Chase, Elaine
    et al.
    International Development Centre, University College London, London, UK.
    Otto, Laura
    Institut für Ethnologie und Kulturwissenschaft, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Belloni, Milena
    Department of Sociology, University of Trento, Trento, Italy.
    Lems, Annika
    Max-Planck Institute for Social Anthropology, Halle/ Saale, Germany; Institute of Social Anthropology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Wernesjö, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Methodological innovations, reflections and dilemmas: The hidden sides of research with migrant young people classified as unaccompanied minors2019In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper offers some behind-the-scenes insights drawn from the collective fieldwork experiences of the contributors to this Special Issue. These include reflections on: how decisions about modes of accessing research participants fundamentally shape the research process and outcomes; the pitfalls of only focusing on young people’s migratory experiences while ignoring the multiple other dimensions to their lives; how we can best capture and represent young people’s often paradoxical vulnerability and agency; the relative merits of methodological innovations increasingly integrated into work with marginalised and hard to reach communities; and, finally, our own positionality when conducting research with migrant young people and the importance of taking account of how our own subjective, political, philosophical and ethical standpoints influence our interactions throughout our research endeavours. These contributions seek to promote greater reflexivity and transparency among academics conducting ethnographically driven research with young people in the context of forced migration.

  • 3.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Umeå universitet, Umeå centrum för genusstudier (UCGS).
    Complying With Colonialism: Gender, Race and Ethnicity in the Nordic Region2012In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 187-188Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Schirmer, Werner
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Weidenstedt, Linda
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Reich, Wendelin
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    From Tolerance to Respect in Inter-Ethnic Contexts2012In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 1049-1065Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When advocates of multiculturalism promote democratic values, they often call for tolerance and respect. The pairwise usage of these concepts wrongly presumes a similar, if not the same, positively connoted meaning. This article depicts an important difference between respect and tolerance, not only in terms of semantics but also regarding the concepts impact on social interactions. Being tolerated often means to be put up with or to be grudgingly ignored. Multicultural approaches that are based on tolerance, then, may send misleading signals, as they implicitly state that members of ethnic and racial minorities are actually not welcome. We argue that respect conveys a more suitable message for successful multicultural policy programmes. Drawing on a sociological theory of respect that connects respect with the agency of the target person, we show that respect means treating people as autonomous agents whose will and interests are taken seriously and who are not looked down on.

  • 5.
    Torres, Sandra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Book review (Naina P. (ed)) Minority elderly care in Europe2005In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 214-214Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Torres, Sandra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Elderly immigrants in Sweden: "Otherness" under construction2006In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 1341-1358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Informed by a social constructionist approach, this article reviews and evaluates the research literature on elderly immigrants in Sweden, shedding light on how a specific category is created and comes to be regarded as a social problem. There is a pervasive 'problematisation' of elderly immigrants in Sweden. The paper argues that a social category of 'elderly immigrants' has been constructed among those concerned with elderly care and policy, even though there is ample evidence that the elderly group is exceptionally diverse and that, apart from a non-Swedish background, the various constituent groups have little in common. They have nonetheless been consistently approached as if they were an easily identifiable and homogeneous social category posing an unusual challenge for elderly-care planners and providers. Thus, as a socially constructed 'problem', these elders seem to have become yet another 'Other' in Swedish society.

  • 7.
    Wernesjö, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Across the threshold: Negotiations of deservingness among unaccompanied young refugees in Sweden2019In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the aftermath of the so-called ‘refugee crisis’ in 2015, unaccompanied minors have been depicted as potential threats and challenges to receiving countries in the Swedish public debate. Through narratives of unaccompanied youngsters from 2011 to 2012, this article will illustrate that these youngsters were already struggling with the ambiguous refugee figures of the ‘deserving’ and ‘undeserving’ prior to the events of 2015. By studying their narratives, I analyse how deservingness comes into play in how they constitute themselves as subjects. In their narratives, they describe themselves as responsible, hard-working youngsters in relation to education and future working life. Moreover, their narratives also illustrate how descriptions of diligence and agency are used in order to oppose the discourse figures of unaccompanied minors as threats or victims. I conclude by suggesting that these narratives can be seen as manifestations of conditional belonging centred on deservingness, which the youngsters negotiate also after they have been granted protection.

  • 8.
    Wernesjö, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Across the threshold: Negotiations of deservingness among unaccompanied young refugees in Sweden2020In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 389-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the aftermath of the so-called ‘refugee crisis’ in 2015, unaccompanied minors have been depicted as potential threats and challenges to receiving countries in the Swedish public debate. Through narratives of unaccompanied youngsters from 2011 to 2012, this article will illustrate that these youngsters were already struggling with the ambiguous refugee figures of the ‘deserving’ and ‘undeserving’ prior to the events of 2015. By studying their narratives, I analyse how deservingness comes into play in how they constitute themselves as subjects. In their narratives, they describe themselves as responsible, hard-working youngsters in relation to education and future working life. Moreover, their narratives also illustrate how descriptions of diligence and agency are used in order to oppose the discourse figures of unaccompanied minors as threats or victims. I conclude by suggesting that these narratives can be seen as manifestations of conditional belonging centred on deservingness, which the youngsters negotiate also after they have been granted protection.

1 - 8 of 8
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