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  • 1.
    Fenton, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The role of port cities and transnational municipal networks in efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions on land and at sea from shipping - an assessment of the World Ports Climate Initiative2017In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 75, p. 271-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2008, 55 of the world's largest ports voluntarily adopted the World Ports Climate Declaration (WPCD) and the International Association of Ports and Harbours committed to long-term work on implementation through the World Ports Climate Initiative (WPCI). This article assesses the work of WPCI since 2008 and makes five recommendations that, if implemented, could support efforts to reduce the climate and environmental impacts of port operations and international shipping. In particular, as the impetus for the WPCD came from a port city – Rotterdam – and their engagement with a transnational municipal network – the C40 Large Cities Climate Leadership Group – the paper considers the role of cities and transnational municipal networks in governance, and the potential for cities to play a more active and influential role in the maritime sector. The article presents an overview of literature on the role and function of transnational municipal networks, the background and development of the WPCD, analysis of the work of WPCI, and a discussion concerning the potential of cities and transnational municipal networks to support and add value to WPCI or similar initiatives in the maritime sector. This informs the conclusions and recommendations to marine policy-makers and port stakeholders.

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  • 2. Pereira, Laura M.
    et al.
    Ortuño Crespo, Guillermo
    Amon, Diva J.
    Badhe, Renuka
    Bandeira, Salomão
    Bengtsson, Frida
    Boettcher, Miranda
    Carmine, Gabrielle
    Cheung, William W.L.
    Chibwe, Bwalya
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change.
    Dunn, Daniel
    Gasalla, Maria A.
    Halouani, Ghassen
    Johnson, David E.
    Jouffray, Jean-Baptiste
    Juri, Silvana
    Keys, Patrick W.
    Lübker, Hannah M.
    Merrie, Andrew S.
    Obaidullah, Farah
    Palacios-Abrantes, Juliano
    Shannon, Lynne J.
    Sumaila, U. Rashid
    Superchi, Edoardo
    Terry, Naomi
    Wabnitz, Colette C.C.
    Yasuhara, Moriaki
    Zhou, Wei
    The living infinite: Envisioning futures for transformed human-nature relationships on the high seas2023In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 153, p. 105644-105644, article id 105644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We find ourselves at a critical crossroads for the future governance of the high seas, but the perceived remoteness of the global ocean creates a psychological barrier for people to engage with it. Given challenges of overexploitation, inequitable access and other sustainability and equity concerns, current ocean governance mechanisms are not fit-for-purpose. This decade offers opportunities for direct impact on ocean governance, however, triggering a global transformation on how we use and protect the half of our planet requires a concerted effort that is guided by shared values and principles across regions and sectors. The aim of the series of workshops outlined in this paper, was to undertake a futures thinking process that could use the Nature Futures Framework as a mechanism to bring more transformative energy into how humans conceptualise the high seas and therefore how we aim to govern the ocean. We found that engaging with the future through science fiction narratives allowed a more radical appreciation of what could be and infusing science with artistic elements can inspire audiences beyond academia. Thus, creative endeavours of co-production that promote and encourage imagination to address current challenges should be considered as important tools in the science-policy interface, also as a way to elicit empathetic responses. This workshop series was a first, and hopefully promising, step towards generating a more creative praxis in how we imagine and then act for a better future for the high seas.

  • 3.
    Pereira, Laura M.
    et al.
    Global Change Institute, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa; Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Ortuño Crespo, Guillermo
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Sweden; Keystone Ocean S.L., Spain .
    Amon, Diva J.
    SpeSeas, D’Abadie, Trinidad and Tobago; Marine Science Institute, University of California Santa Barbara, USA.
    Badhe, Renuka
    European Polar Board, NWO, The Hague, the Netherlands.
    Bandeira, Salomão
    Department of Biological Sciences, Eduardo Mondlane Universidade, Mozambique.
    Bengtsson, Frida
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Boettcher, Miranda
    German Institute for International and Security Affairs, Germany; Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, the Netherlands.
    Carmine, Gabrielle
    Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab, Division of Marine Science and Conservation, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, USA.
    Cheung, William W.L.
    Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, The University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Chibwe, Bwalya
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University.
    Dunn, Daniel
    Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation Science, University of Queensland, Australia.
    Gasalla, Maria A.
    Oceanographic Institute, University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Halouani, Ghassen
    IFREMER, Unité halieutique Manche-Mer du Nord Ifremer, France.
    Johnson, David E.
    Global Ocean Biodiversity Inititive, UK; School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Jouffray, Jean-Baptiste
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Sweden; Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions, Stanford University, USA.
    Juri, Silvana
    School of Design, Carnegie Mellon University, USA; SARAS Institute, Uruguay.
    Keys, Patrick W.
    Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, USA.
    Lübker, Hannah M.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Merrie, Andrew S.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Obaidullah, Farah
    Women4Oceans, the Netherlands.
    Palacios-Abrantes, Juliano
    Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, The University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Shannon, Lynne J.
    Sumaila, U. Rashid
    Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, The University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Superchi, Edoardo
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Terry, Naomi
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Wabnitz, Colette C.C.
    Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, The University of British Columbia, Canada; Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions, Stanford University, USA.
    Yasuhara, Moriaki
    Swire Institute of Marine Science, Institute for Climate and Carbon Neutrality, and Musketeers Foundation Institute of Data Science, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China; State Key Laboratory of Marine Pollution, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China.
    Zhou, Wei
    Greenpeace East Asia, China.
    The living infinite: Envisioning futures for transformed human-nature relationships on the high seas2023In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 153, article id 105644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We find ourselves at a critical crossroads for the future governance of the high seas, but the perceived remoteness of the global ocean creates a psychological barrier for people to engage with it. Given challenges of overexploitation, inequitable access and other sustainability and equity concerns, current ocean governance mechanisms are not fit-for-purpose. This decade offers opportunities for direct impact on ocean governance, however, triggering a global transformation on how we use and protect the half of our planet requires a concerted effort that is guided by shared values and principles across regions and sectors. The aim of the series of workshops outlined in this paper, was to undertake a futures thinking process that could use the Nature Futures Framework as a mechanism to bring more transformative energy into how humans conceptualise the high seas and therefore how we aim to govern the ocean. We found that engaging with the future through science fiction narratives allowed a more radical appreciation of what could be and infusing science with artistic elements can inspire audiences beyond academia. Thus, creative endeavours of co-production that promote and encourage imagination to address current challenges should be considered as important tools in the science-policy interface, also as a way to elicit empathetic responses. This workshop series was a first, and hopefully promising, step towards generating a more creative praxis in how we imagine and then act for a better future for the high seas.

  • 4.
    Wilewska-Bien, Magda
    et al.
    Department of Mechanics and Maritime Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Reception of sewage in the Baltic Sea: The port's role in the sustainable management of ship wastes2018In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 93, p. 207-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2019, the special area requirements under MARPOL 73/78 Annex IV will come into effect in the Baltic Sea.This puts pressure on ports to develop reception facilities for sewage from passenger ships. This paper is built ona review of published information about the ports´ work to update sewage reception facilities and the results ofan e-mail questionnaire that was sent to a number of ports in the region, and interviews with environmentalmanagers from two major ports in the region. During the last 15 years, major investments have been made inport reception facilities in many passenger ports. However, there are still diverging views on the question if theport waste reception capacity in the region is sufficient. A few ports have for a long time been dominant asregards the reception of sewage in the Baltic Sea region, but recent increases in the ports´ waste receptioncapacity have predominantly occurred in smaller ports. This has been brought about by a replacement of mobilemeans for sewage collection with fixed connection systems or an increase of capacity of existing fixed connectionsystems. Following HELCOM recommendation, the majority of the ports have introduced a no-special-fee systembut there are differences in how this is applied.

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    fulltext
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