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  • 1.
    Janné, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Construction logistics governing guidelines in urban development projects2019In: Construction Innovation, ISSN 1471-4175, E-ISSN 1477-0857, Vol. 19, no 1, p. -109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Construction logistics centres (CLC) is one possible solution to manage logistics flows in urban construction projects. The aim of CLC’s are to decrease disturbances to the surrounding environment and to improve logistics flows and the planning of the same to construction sites. However, as CLC’s is a new phenomenon, there is a lack of research with regards to how CLC’s are experienced by stakeholders utilising and/or running them. Therefore, the paper answers two research questions relating to the experiences of three

    different stakeholder groups using a CLC in a large development project.

    Design/methodology/approach: An exploratory single case research design was chosen to explain how the utilisation and governance of a CLC has been experienced by three main contractors, the CLC operator and the municipality initiating the CLC. Case study methodology is a valid choice when the context and experiences are critical to understanding the phenomenon comprehensively.

    Data has been collected through interviews, site visits, observations and documentation. 

    Findings: There is potential in utilising CLC’s in development projects, and positive aspects such as consolidation effects and enhanced planning efforts were found. What is evident however, is that the design and implementation of CLC’s must be based on comprehensive stakeholder analysis and clear governance strategies to lay the foundation for a good construction process for the main contractors. Aspects to consider when designing a CLC governance strategy identified were: customer clarification, multi-stakeholder logistics analysis, and information.

    Research implications: Problems and possibilities in utilising CLC’s are explored and future research directions are presented. Further research is needed to verify the findings from SRS. With the novelty of CLC’s, it would be useful to study other CLC projects and different solutions as well. 

    Practical implications: Contractors, TPL providers, and municipalities can find inspiration for how to design and implement CLC governance strategies based on experiences from the SRS case.

    Originality/value: This paper contributes by highlighting contextual aspects affecting the experiences of using and operating CLC’s from different stakeholder perspectives.

  • 2.
    Jonsson, Henric
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rudberg, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    KPIs for measuring performance of production systems for residential building: A production strategy perspective2017In: Construction Innovation, ISSN 1471-4175, E-ISSN 1477-0857, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 381-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    This paper aims to define key performance indicators (KPIs) for measuring performance of production systems for residential building from a production strategy perspective.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A literature review is done to identify suitable competitive priorities and to provide grounds for developing KPIs to measure them. The KPIs are evaluated and validated through interviews with industry experts from five case companies producing multifamily residences. Furthermore, two of the case companies are used to illustrate how the KPIs can be employed for analysing different production systems from a manufacturing strategy perspective.

    Findings

    Defined, and empirically validated, KPIs for measuring the competitive priorities quality, cost (level and dependability), delivery (speed and dependability) and flexibility (volume and mix) of different production systems.

    Research limitations/implications

    To further validate the KPIs, more empirical tests need to be done and further research also needs to address mix flexibility, which better needs to account for product range to provide a trustworthy KPI.

    Practical implications

    The defined KPIs can be used to evaluate and monitor the performance of different production systems’ ability to meet market demands, hence focusing on the link between the market and the firm’s production function. The KPIs can also be used to track a production systems’ ability to perform over time.

    Originality/value

    Most research that evaluate and compare production systems for residential building is based on qualitative estimations of manufacturing outputs. There is a lack of quantitative KPIs to measure performance at a strategic level. This research does this, identifying what to measure, but also how to measure four competitive priorities through 14 defined KPIs.

  • 3.
    Sandberg, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bildsten, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Coordination and waste in industrialised housing2011In: Construction Innovation, ISSN 1471-4175, E-ISSN 1477-0857, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 77-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This study maintains that there is a need for proper execution of coordination mechanisms as a means to reduce waste. The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between the coordination of activities and resources on the one hand, and the occurrence of different types of waste on the other.

    Design/methodology/approach – The empirical context of this paper is a case study at a Swedish construction company that has applied the industrialised housing concept; a concept which has increased in popularity in recent years. The core concept of industrialised housing means that houses are (more or less) pre-manufactured in specific production units, i.e. factories, and thereafter assembled on-site.

    Findings – The analysis highlights the importance of having the right type as well as the right amount of coordination. In addition, obstacles and challenges for proper coordination are discussed.

    Originality/value – Even if not all waste can be explained and eliminated by appropriate coordination, this research shows that coordination theory provides lean researchers with a new tool for analysis of the supply chain and how waste can be eliminated.

  • 4.
    Thunberg, Micael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rudberg, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Categorising on-site problems: A supply chain management perspective on construction projects2017In: Construction Innovation, ISSN 1471-4175, E-ISSN 1477-0857, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 90-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This study aims to identify and categorise common on-site problems from a supply chain management (SCM) perspective and to trace the origin of these problems in the construction project process, the supply chain or in the intersection between these processes. This allows for identification of how on-site problems affect SCM in construction projects and how they can be mitigated.

    Design/methodology/approach – A literature review in combination with semi-structured interviews was used to identify on-site problems. This enabled triangulation and strengthened both construct validity and internal validity.

    Findings – On-site problems can be categorised in one of the four following categories: material flows, internal communication, external communication or complexity. The first category has its origin in the supply chain, the second in the construction project process, the third in the supply chain-construction process intersection on site and the fourth in the construction project as a whole. The findings conclude that on-site problems often originate from construction companies’ lack of supply chain orientation.

    Research limitations/implications – It is suggested that supply chain planning (SCP) can facilitate on-site problem mitigation in construction project management. This extends the body of knowledge of SCP in construction project management and supports the development of effective on-site construction project management.

    Practical implications – The results show that SCP can aid construction project management in handling on-site problems earlier in the project process.

    Originality/value – The main value lies in extending the body of knowledge in construction project management research by applying an SCM perspective and by introducing SCP to support more effective construction project management

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