liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Björnsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonsson, Marie
    Swerea Sicomp, Compraser Labs, Bröderna Ugglas Gata hus 208B, 58188 Linköping, Sweden.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Automated material handling in compostie manufacturing using pick-and-place systems - a review2018In: Robotics and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, ISSN 0736-5845, E-ISSN 1879-2537, Vol. 51, p. 222-229Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With increasing use of fiber reinforced polymer composites follows a natural pursuit for more rational and effective manufacturing. Robotic pick-and-place systems can be used to automate handling of a multitude of materials used in the manufacturing of composite parts. There are systems developed for automated layup of prepreg, dry fibers and thermoplastic blanks as well as to handle auxiliary materials used in manufacturing. The aim of this paper is to highlight the challenges associated with automated handling of these materials and to analyze the main design principles that have been employed for pick-and-place systems in terms of handling strategy, reconfigurability, gripping technology and distribution of gripping points etc. The review shows that it is hard to find generic solutions for automated material handling due to the great variety in material properties. Few cases of industrial applications in full-scale manufacturing could be identified.

  • 2.
    Olsson, Tomas
    et al.
    Department of Automatic Control, Lund University, Lund and ABB Robotics, Department RC and ABB Corporate Research, Västerås, Sweden.
    Haage, Mathias
    Department of Computer Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Kihlman, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. DELFOi, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Rolf
    Department of Automatic Control, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Klas
    Department of Computer Science, Lund University, Sweden.
    Robertsson, Anders
    Department of Automatic Control, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Isaksson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ossbahr, Gilbert
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Brogardh, Torgny
    ABB Robotics, Department RC and ABB Corporate Research, Västerås, Sweden.
    Cost-efficient drilling using industrial robots with high-bandwidth force feedback2010In: Robotics and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, ISSN 0736-5845, E-ISSN 1879-2537, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 24-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we present a method for high-precision drilling using an industrial robot with high-bandwidth force feedback which is used for building up pressure to clamp-up an end-effector to the work-piece surface prior to drilling, The focus is to eliminate the sliding movement (skating) of the end-effector during the clamp-up of the end-effector to the work-piece surface, an undesired effect that is due to the comparatively low mechanical stiffness of typical serial industrial robots. This compliance also makes the robot deflect due to the cutting forces, resulting in poor hole position accuracy and to some extent in poor hole quality. Recently, functionality for high-bandwidth force control has found its way into industrial robot control systems. This could potentially open up the possibility for robotic drilling systems with improved performance, using only standard systems without excessive extra hardware and calibration techniques. Instead of automation with expensive fixtures and precise machinery, our approach was to make use of standard low-cost robot equipment in combination with sensor feedback. The resulting sliding suppression control results in greatly improved hole positioning and quality. The conceptual idea behind the force control is useful also in many other robotic applications requiring external sensor feedback control.

  • 3.
    Persson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Production Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The impact of different levels of detail in manufacturing systems simulation models2002In: Robotics and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, ISSN 0736-5845, E-ISSN 1879-2537, Vol. 18, no 3-4, p. 319-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modelling and simulating manufacturing systems often involves several different organisational units. This can make data collection difficult and it can be hard to obtain data that allows for the model to be built with a consistent level of detail. To investigate the impact of a varying level of detail, a manufacturing system was modelled using different levels of detail. The first model was modelled at a high level of detail containing all elements in the system. The second model was an aggregation of some of the processes in the system and the third model consisted only of the main processes. The experiments performed with the models, aimed at finding differences between models' outputs that originated from the choice of the level of detail. The results show that there are significant differences between the models. The simulation models used for this paper are made in collaboration with a company in the mobile communications industry and deals with supply chain problems.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf