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  • 1.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Scott Kim, Woojin
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Chan, Sharon
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute.
    Cheng, Danni
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute.
    Agholme, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Geriatrics.
    Barnham, Kevin
    University of Melbourne.
    McCann, Heather
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute.
    Halliday, Glenda
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute.
    Garner, Brett
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute.
    Increased expression of the lysosomal cholesterol transporter NPC1 in Alzheimers disease2010In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids, ISSN 1388-1981, E-ISSN 1879-2618, Vol. 1801, no 8, p. 831-838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Niemann-Pick type Cl (NPC1) protein mediates the trafficking of cholesterol from lysosomes to other organelles. Mutations in the NPC1 gene lead to the retention of cholesterol and other lipids in the lysosomal compartment, and such defects are the basis of NPC disease. Several parallels exist between NPC disease and Alzheimers disease (AD), including altered cholesterol homeostasis, changes in the lysosomal system, neurofibrillary tangles, and increased amyloid-beta generation. How the expression of NPC1 in the human brain is affected in AD has not been investigated so far. In the present study, we measured NPC1 mRNA and protein expression in three distinct regions of the human brain, and we revealed that NPC1 expression is upregulated at both mRNA and protein levels in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of AD patients compared to control individuals. In the cerebellum, a brain region that is relatively spared in AD, no difference in NPC1 expression was detected. Similarly, murine NPC1 mRNA levels were increased in the hippocampus of 12-month-old transgenic mice expressing a familial AD form of human amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP) and presenilin-1 (APP/PS1tg) compared to 12-month-old wild type mice, whereas no change in NPC1 was detected in mouse cerebellum. Immunohistochemical analysis of human hippocampus indicated that NPC1 expression was strongest in neurons. However, in vitro studies revealed that NPC1 expression was not induced by transfecting SK-N-SH neurons with human APP or by treating them with oligomeric amyloid-beta peptide. Total cholesterol levels were reduced in hippocampus from AD patients compared to control individuals, and it is therefore possible that the increased expression of NPC1 is linked to perturbed cholesterol homeostasis in AD.

  • 2.
    Ljunggren, Stefan A
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Levels, Johannes H M
    Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Hovingh, Kees
    Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Holleboom, Adriaan G
    Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Vergeer, Menno
    Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Argyri, Letta
    National Center for Scientific Research "Demokritos", Athens, Greece.
    Gkolfinopoulou, Christina
    National Center for Scientific Research "Demokritos", Athens, Greece.
    Chroni, Angeliki
    National Center for Scientific Research "Demokritos", Athens, Greece.
    Sierts, Jeroen A
    Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Kastelein, John J
    Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert
    University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Lipoprotein profiles in human heterozygote carriers of a functional mutation P297S in scavenger receptor class B1.2015In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids, ISSN 1388-1981, E-ISSN 1879-2618, Vol. 1851, no 12, p. 1587-1595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) is an important HDL receptor involved in cholesterol uptake and efflux, but its physiological role in human lipoprotein metabolism is not fully understood. Heterozygous carriers of the SR-B1P297S mutation are characterized by increased HDL cholesterol levels, impaired cholesterol efflux from macrophages and attenuated adrenal function. Here, the composition and function of lipoproteins were studied in SR-B1P297S heterozygotes.

    Lipoproteins from six SR-B1P297S carriers and six family controls were investigated. HDL and LDL/VLDL were isolated by ultracentrifugation and proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. HDL antioxidant properties, paraoxonase 1 activities, apoA-I methionine oxidations and HDL cholesterol efflux capacity were assessed.

    Multivariate modeling separated carriers from controls based on lipoprotein composition. Protein analyses showed a significant enrichment of apoE in LDL/VLDL and of apoL-1 in HDL from heterozygotes compared to controls. The relative distribution of plasma apoE was increased in LDL and in lipid-free form. There were no significant differences in paraoxonase 1 activities, HDL antioxidant properties or HDL cholesterol efflux capacity but heterozygotes showed a significant increase of oxidized methionines in apoA-I.

    The SR-B1P297S mutation affects both HDL and LDL/VLDL protein compositions. The increase of apoE in carriers suggests a compensatory mechanism for attenuated SR-B1 mediated cholesterol uptake by HDL. Increased methionine oxidation may affect HDL function by reducing apoA-I binding to its targets. The results illustrate the complexity of lipoprotein metabolism that has to be taken into account in future therapeutic strategies aiming at targeting SR-B1.

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  • 3.
    Patanapirunhakit, Patamat
    et al.
    Mahidol Univ, Thailand; Univ Glasgow, Scotland; Univ Glasgow, Scotland.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Mulder, Monique
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Ljunggren, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Graham, Delyth
    Univ Glasgow, Scotland.
    Freeman, Dilys
    Univ Glasgow, Scotland.
    Sphingolipids in HDL - Potential markers for adaptation to pregnancy?2021In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids, ISSN 1388-1981, E-ISSN 1879-2618, Vol. 1866, no 8, article id 158955Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) exhibits many functions that render it an effective endothelial protective agent and may underlie its potential role in protecting the maternal vascular endothelium during pregnancy. In non-pregnant individuals, the HDL lipidome is altered in metabolic disease compared to healthy individuals and is linked to reduced cholesterol efflux, an effect that can be reversed by lifestyle management. Specific sphingolipids such as sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) have been shown to mediate the vaso-dilatory effects of plasma HDL via interaction with the endothelial nitric oxide synthase pathway. This review describes the relationship between plasma HDL and vascular function during healthy pregnancy and details how this is lost in preeclampsia, a disorder of pregnancy associated with widespread endothelial dysfunction. Evidence of a role for HDL sphingolipids, in particular S1P and ceramide, in cardiovascular disease and in healthy pregnancy and pre-eclampsia is discussed. Available data suggest that HDL-S1P and HDL-ceramide can mediate vascular protection in healthy pregnancy but not in preeclampsia. HDL sphingolipids thus are of potential importance in the healthy maternal adaptation to pregnancy.

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  • 4.
    Svartz, Jesper
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomgran, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammarström, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderström, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leukotriene C4 synthase homo-oligomers detected in living cells by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer2003In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids, ISSN 1388-1981, E-ISSN 1879-2618, Vol. 1633, no 2, p. 90-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are biologically active compounds derived from arachidonic acid which have important pathophysiological roles in asthma and inflammation. The cysteinyl leukotriene LTC4 and its metabolites LTD4 and LTE4 stimulate bronchoconstriction, airway mucous formation and generalized edema formation. LTC4 is formed by addition of glutathione to LTA4, catalyzed by the integral membrane protein, LTC4 synthase (LTCS). We now report the use of bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) to demonstrate that LTCS forms homo-oligomers in living cells. Fusion proteins of LTCS and Renilla luciferase (Rluc) and a variant of green fluorescent protein (GFP), respectively, were prepared. High BRET signals were recorded in transiently transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells co-expressing Rluc/LTCS and GFP/LTCS. Homo-oligomer formation in living cells was verified by co-transfection of a plasmid expressing non-chimeric LTCS. This resulted in dose-dependent attenuation of the BRET signal. Additional evidence for oligomer formation was obtained in cell-free assays using glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assay. To map interaction domains for oligomerization, GFP/LTCS fusion proteins were prepared with truncated variants of LTCS. The results obtained identified a C-terminal domain (amino acids 114–150) sufficient for oligomerization of LTCS. Another, centrally located, interaction domain appeared to exist between amino acids 57–88. The functional significance of LTCS homo-oligomer formation is currently being investigated.

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