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  • 1.
    Athalye, Akshay
    et al.
    Stony Brook University, USA.
    Savic, Vladimir
    Signal Processing Application Group, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Bolic, Miodrag
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Djuric, Petar M.
    Stony Brook University, USA.
    Novel Semi-Passive RFID System for Indoor Localization2013In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 528-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present a novel semi-passive radio-frequency identification (RFID) system for accurate indoor localization. The system is composed of a standard ultra high frequency (UHF) ISO-18000-6C compliant RFID reader, a set of standard passive RFID tags whose locations are known, and a newly developed tag-like RFID component, which is attached to the items that need to be localized. The new semi-passive component, referred to as sensatag (sense-a-tag), has a dual functionality: it can sense and decode communication between the reader and standard tags in its proximity, and can communicate with the reader like standard tags using backscatter modulation. Based on the information conveyed by the sensatags to the reader, localization algorithms based on binary sensor principles can be developed. We conduct a number of experiments in a laboratory to quantify the performance of our system, including two real applications, one finding the exact placement of items on shelves, and the other estimating the direction of item movement.

  • 2.
    Bur, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Saarland University, Saarbruecken, Germany.
    Andersson, Mike
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schütze, Andreas
    Saarland University, Saarbruecken, Germany.
    Detecting Volatile Organic Compounds in the ppb Range with Gas Sensitive Platinum gate SiC-Field Effect Transistors2014In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 14, no 9, p. 3221-3228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the use of a platinum gate gas-sensitive SiC field-effect transistor (SiC-FET) was studied for the detection of low concentrations of hazardous volatile organic compounds (VOCs). For this purpose, a new gas mixing system was realized providing VOCs down to sub-parts per billion levels with permeation ovens and gas predilution. Benzene, naphthalene, and formaldehyde were chosen as major indoor air pollutants and their characteristics are briefly reviewed. Measurements have shown that the selected VOCs can be detected by the SiC-FET in the parts per billion range and indicate a detection limit of ~1 ppb for benzene and naphthalene and ~10 ppb for formaldehyde in humid atmospheres. For 10-ppb naphthalene at 20% r.h., the sensor response is high with 12 mV, respectively, a relative response of 1.4%. Even in a background of 2-ppm ethanol, the relative response is still 0.3%. Quantification independent of the humidity level can be achieved using temperature cycled operation combined with pattern recognition, here linear discriminant analysis. Discrimination of benzene, naphthalene, and formaldehyde is also possible.

  • 3.
    Bur, Christian
    et al.
    University of Saarland.
    Reimann, Peter
    Dillinger Hutte GTS.
    Andersson, Mike
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schuetze, Andreas
    University of Saarland.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Increasing the Selectivity of Pt-Gate SiC Field Effect Gas Sensors by Dynamic Temperature Modulation2012In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 12, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a diode coupled silicon carbide field effect transistor (FET) with platinum as catalytic gate material, the influence of dynamic temperature modulation on the selectivity of gas analysis sensors FETs has been investigated. This operating mode, studied intensively for semiconductor gas sensors, has only recently been applied to FETs. A suitable temperature cycle for detection of typical exhaust gases (CO, NO, C3H6, H-2, NH3) was developed and combined with appropriate signal processing. The sensor data were evaluated using multivariate statistics, e.g., linear discriminant analysis. Measurements have proven that typical exhaust gases can be discriminated in backgrounds with 0, 10, and 20% oxygen. Furthermore, we are able to quantify the mentioned gases and to determine unknown concentrations based on training data. Very low levels of relative humidity below a few percent influence the sensor response considerably but for higher levels the cross interference of humidity is negligible. In addition, experiments regarding stability and reproducibility were performed.

  • 4.
    Cai, Haibin
    et al.
    Univ Portsmouth, England.
    Fang, Yinfeng
    Univ Portsmouth, England.
    Jue, Zhaojie
    Univ Portsmouth, England.
    Costescu, Cristina
    Babes Bolyai Univ, Romania.
    David, Daniel
    Babes Bolyai Univ, Romania.
    Billing, Erik
    Univ Skovde, Sweden.
    Ziemke, Tom
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Skovde, Sweden.
    Thill, Serge
    Univ Plymouth, England.
    Belpaeme, Tony
    Univ Plymouth, England.
    Vanderborght, Bram
    Vrije Univ Brussel, Belgium; Flanders Make, Belgium.
    Vernon, David
    Carnegie Mellon Univ Africa, Rwanda.
    Richardson, Kathleen
    De Montfort Univ, England.
    Liu, Honghai
    Univ Portsmouth, England.
    Sensing-Enhanced Therapy System for Assessing Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Feasibility Study2019In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 1508-1518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is evident that recently reported robot-assisted therapy systems for assessment of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) lack autonomous interaction abilities and require significant human resources. This paper proposes a sensing system that automatically extracts and fuses sensory features, such as body motion features, facial expressions, and gaze features, further assessing the children behaviors by mapping them to therapist-specified behavioral classes. Experimental results show that the developed system has a capability of interpreting characteristic data of children with ASD, thus has the potential to increase the autonomy of robots under the supervision of a therapist and enhance the quality of the digital description of children with ASD. The research outcomes pave the way to a feasible machine-assisted system for their behavior assessment.

  • 5.
    D. Black, Robert
    et al.
    Sicel Technology Inc, Morrisville, NC 27560 USA;.
    M. Reichert, William
    Duke University, Department Biomed Engn, Durham, NC 27708 USA.
    P. F. Turner, Anthony
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Introduction for the special issue of the sensors journal: In vivo sensors for medicine2008In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 8, no 02-jan, p. 3-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Davide, F.
    et al.
    IEEE, Telecom Italia S.p.A, D1 Forraazione, I-00148 Rome, Italy.
    Andersson, Mike
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Holmberg, Martin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Chaotic chemical sensing2002In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 2, no 6, p. 656-662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we have examined the behavior of a chaotic circuit where one of the components has been replaced by a chemical sensor. The response of the sensor is manifested as a change in the attractor of the circuit. Furthermore, with a proper operating point, a small response of the sensor causes a change in the attractor of the circuit within a time much shorter than the normally defined response time of the sensor. This technique unites sensors and data processing as one combined unit in a unique fashion. © 2002 IEEE.

  • 7.
    Hassanli, Kourosh
    et al.
    Shiraz University of Technology, Iran.
    Masoud Sayedi, Sayed
    Isfahan University of Technology, Iran.
    Wikner, Jacob
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Circuits and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    High Resolution Digital Imager Based on Time Multiplexing Algorithm2017In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 17, no 9, p. 2831-2840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a new high-resolution digital imager based on a time multiplexing scheme is proposed. The imager produces a 256-grayscale image through capturing 256 successive frames that each belongs to a specific luminance range. Each pixel includes a 1-b analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and a single bit static memory to improve the fill factor. The in-pixel ADC is designed as a compact and fast converter to achieve a high-resolution and video-rate image sensor. The proposed sensor is designed and implemented in a standard 180-nm CMOS technology. The imager achieves an overall dynamic range of over 140 dB at video rate imaging. The pixel pitch is 18.3 mu m and the fill factor is about 48%. The circuit operates at a supply voltage as low as 800 mV. At this supply voltage and at video rate imaging, its power consumption is about 4.33 nW. The proposed imager can directly perform some pre-processing algorithms, such as image segmentation and binarization. Additionally, the proposed method transfers the memory and process units of the pixels to the external of the sensor array so it provides a suitable structure for designing high-resolution, wide dynamic range, and fast general-purpose image sensors.

  • 8.
    Kaushik, K.
    et al.
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Bharti School of Telecom, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi, India.
    Mishra, Deepak
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Bharti School of Telecom, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi, India.
    De, Swades
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Bharti School of Telecom, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi, India.
    Chowdhury, Kaushik Roy
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA.
    Heinzelman, Wendi
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.
    Low-cost wake-up receiver for RF energy harvesting wireless sensor networks2016In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 16, no 16, p. 6270-6278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The existing passive wake-up receivers (WuRxs) are radio frequency identification (RFID) tag based, which incur high cost and complexity. In this paper, we study cost-effective and long-range WuRx solutions for range-based wake-up (RW) as well as directed wake-up (DW). In particular, we consider the case of an RF energy harvesting wireless sensor node and investigate how a low-cost WuRx can be built using an RF energy harvester available at the node. Experimental results show that our developed prototype can achieve a wake-up range of 1.16 m with +13 dBm transmit power. Furthermore, our empirical study shows that at +30 dBm transmit power the wake-up distance of our developed RW module is >9 m. High accuracy of DW is demonstrated by sending a 5-bit ID from a transmitter at a bit rate up to 33.33 kbps. Finally, we present optimized WuRx designs for RW and DW using Agilent advanced design system, which offer up to 5.69 times higher wake-up range for RW and energy savings per bit of about 0.41 mJ and 21.40 nJ, respectively, at the transmitter and the sensor node in DW.

  • 9.
    Klingvall, Roger
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    UV-SLPT for gas sensor research on MISiC devices2007In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 7, no 03-Apr, p. 592-599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A modified Scanning Light Pulse Technique (SLPT) setup that can be used to evaluate SiC-based gas-sensitive field-effect devices is introduced. This is exemplified with measurements on a Pt-MISiC capacitor that has a metal thickness gradient. The device shows large responses to hydrogen and ammonia in air. The H-2 and NH3 responses show a complementary dependence on the Pt film thickness at 140 degrees C. The temperature dependence differs however for the two gases. The measurement setup uses UV transparent optics together with mechanical chopping of light from a short wavelength light source. The spatial resolution of the system is found to be approximately 50 mu m.

  • 10.
    Klingvall, Roger
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Sub ppm detection of hydrogen2008In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 8, no 03-Apr, p. 301-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A light pulse technique and a field-effect device were used to detect small concentration steps of hydrogen in air. The detection limit was lower than 40 ppb, which is at least one order of magnitude lower than previously reported measurements (with field-effect devices) of hydrogen concentration in air. The device structure was a metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor with a metal double layer with 17.5 nm Pd (upper layer) and 7.5 nm Pt on a SiO2 insulator and a Si substrate.

  • 11.
    Klingvall, Roger
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Löfdahl, Mikael
    AppliedSensor AB.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    A combinatorial approach for field-effect gas sensor research and development2005In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 5, no 5, p. 995-1003Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Kok, Manon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schön, Thomas B.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Magnetometer calibration using inertial sensors2016In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 16, no 14, p. 5679-5689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work we present a practical calibration algorithm that calibrates a magnetometer using inertial sensors. The calibration corrects for magnetometer sensor errors, for the presence of magnetic disturbances and for misalignment between the magnetometer and the inertial sensor axes. It is based on a maximum likelihood formulation and is formulated as an offline method. It is shown to give good results using data from two different commercially available sensor units. Using the calibrated magnetometer measurements in combination with the inertial sensors to determine orientation, is shown to lead to significantly improved heading estimates.

  • 13.
    Kumar, Pardeep
    et al.
    UiT Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Gurtov, Andrei
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. ITMO University, Russia.
    Iinatti, Jari
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Sain, Mangal
    Dongseo University, South Korea.
    Ha, Phuong H.
    UiT Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Access Control Protocol With Node Privacy in Wireless Sensor Networks2016In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 16, no 22, p. 8142-8150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For preventing malicious nodes joining wireless sensor networks (WSNs), an access control mechanism is necessary for the trustworthy cooperation between the nodes. In addition to access control, recently, privacy has been an important topic regarding how to achieve privacy without disclosing the real identity of communicating entities in the WSNs. Based on elliptic curve cryptography, in this paper, we present an access control protocol with node privacy (called ACP) for the WSN. The proposed scheme not only accomplishes the node authentication but also provides the identity privacy (i.e., source to destination and vice-versa) for the communicating entities. Compared with the current state of the art, the proposed solution can defend actively against attacks. The efficacy and the efficiency of the proposed ACP are confirmed through the test bed analysis and performance evaluations.

  • 14.
    Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    SINTEF ICT.
    Storstrom, Olav
    SINTEF ICT.
    Tollefsen Seip, Torleif
    SINTEF ICT.
    Hjelstuen, Magnus
    SINTEF ICT.
    Bjorklund, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansson, Mats L
    Institute Volvo Car Corp.
    Grant, Ann
    Volvo Technology Corp.
    Jozsa, Peter
    Volvo Technology Corp.
    Faegerman, Per-Erik
    Mandalon Technol AB.
    Paaso, Jaska
    Selm Oy.
    Hammarlund, Lars
    SenSiC.
    Thermal Management System for Particle Sensors Design, Performance and Verification2012In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 2299-2305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the thermal performance of a proposed thermal management device (patented in 2009) intended for a thermophoresis-based soot sensor. The performance was studied for temperatures ranging from 50 to 400 degrees C and for exhaust speeds up to 10 m/s. It also presents the design and basic concepts. The performance study and design development were performed with finite element analysis (FEA). The FEA results were then verified with experiments in a heated wind tunnel. The relative performance of the device was found to increase for higher temperatures and lower wind speeds. The main conclusion drawn from this paper was that it is feasible to cool a sensor surface enough for a thermophoresis-based soot sensor in a diesel exhaust system.

  • 15.
    Lindgren, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Spångeus, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Novel Feature Extraction Algorithm for Asymmetric Classification2004In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 4, p. 643-650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A linear feature extraction technique for asymmetric distributions is introduced, the asymmetric class projection (ACP). By emph {asymmetric classification} is understood discrimination among distributions with different covariance matrices. Two distributions with unequal covariance matrices do not in general have a symmetry plane, a fact that makes the analysis more difficult compared to the symmetric case. The ACP is similar to linear discriminant analysis (LDA) in the respect that both aim at extracting discriminating features (linear combinations or projections) from many variables. However, the drawback of the well known LDA is the assumption of symmetric classes with separated centroids. The ACP, incontrast, works on (two) possibly concentric distributions with unequal covariance matrices. The ACP is tested on data from anarray of semiconductor gas sensors with the purpose of distinguish bad grain from good.

  • 16.
    Nakagomi, S.
    et al.
    School of Science and Engineering, Ishinomaki Senshu University, Ishinomaki, Japan.
    Lloyd-Spets, Anita
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Tobias, P.
    Center for Sensor Materials, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-2320, United States.
    Electrical characterization of carbon monoxide sensitive high temperature sensor diode based on catalytic metal gate - Insulator - Silicon carbide structure2002In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 379-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Field-effect gas sensors based on catalytic metal-insulator-silicon carbide (MISiC) devices are investigated. For the evaluation of the barrier height, the temperature dependence of the current-voltage (I-V) and the capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics of MISiC Schottky diodes were investigated in CO and O2 atmospheres. Four methods were used to evaluate how a change in gas ambient influences the barrier height of the diode: a change of the intersection current at zero voltage in the forward direction of the I-V curve, a change of the temperature dependence in the forward direction and the reverse direction, respectively, of the I-V curve, and a change of the intersection voltage of 1/C2 versus V plot. The four methods gave similar changes in the barrier height for the device in 8000 ppm CO and 4000 ppm O2. The values of barrier height obtained from the I-V curves were here normalized by the ideality factor calculated from I-V measurements. The correlation between the barrier height change obtained from the I-V and the C-V measurements, respectively, is discussed regarding the ideality factor. It is proposed that absolute value of the barrier height under flat-band condition is the most important for the evaluation of the barrier height. In the mixture of CO and O2, the change of barrier height obtained from the C-V curve had roughly the same values as that from the I-V curve when normalized by the ideality factors. © 2002 IEEE.

  • 17.
    Sodhro, Ali Hassan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Electrical Engineering Department Sukkur IBA, Pakistan.
    Pirbhulal, Sandeep
    CAS, SIAT, Shenzhen, China .
    Sodhro, Gul Hassan
    Physics Shah Abdul Latif, Pakistan .
    Gurtov, Andrei
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Muzamal, Muhammad
    Department of Computer Science Bahria University, Pakistan.
    Luo, Zongwei
    Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Computational Intelligence, China .
    A Joint Transmission Power Control and Duty-Cycle Approach for Smart Healthcare System2019In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 19, no 19, p. 8479-8486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging revolution in the healthcare has caught the attention of both the industry and academia due to the rapid proliferation in the wearable devices and innovative techniques. In the mean-time, Body Sensor Networks (BSNs) have become the potential candidate in transforming the entire landscape of the medical world. However, large battery lifetime and less power drain are very vital for these resource-constrained sensor devices while collecting the bio-signals. Hence, minimizing their charge and energy depletions are still very challenging tasks. It is examined through large real-time data sets that due to the dynamic nature of the wireless channel, the traditional predictive transmission power control (PTPC) and a constant transmission power techniques are no more supportive and potential candidates for BSNs. Thus this paper first, proposes a novel joint transmission power control (TPC) and duty-cycle adaptation based framework for pervasive healthcare. Second, adaptive energy-efficient transmission power control (AETPC) algorithm is developed by adapting the temporal variation in the on-body wireless channel amid static (i.e., standing and walking at a constant speed) and dynamic (i.e., running) body postures. Third, a Feedback Control-based duty-cycle algorithm is proposed for adjusting the execution period of tasks (i.e., sensing and transmission). Fourth, system-level battery and energy harvesting models are proposed for body sensor nodes by examining the energy depletion of sensing and transmission tasks. It is validated through Monte Carlo experimental analysis that proposed algorithm saves more energy of 11.5% with reasonable packet loss ratio (PLR) by adjusting both transmission power and duty-cycle unlike the conventional constant TPC and PTPC methods.

  • 18.
    Unéus, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Artursson, Tom
    AppliedSensor AB.
    Mattsson, Mattias
    Vattenfall Utveckling AB.
    Ljung, Per
    Vattenfall Utveckling AB.
    Wigren, Roger
    AppliedSensor AB.
    Mårtensson, Per
    Proxedra AB.
    Holmberg, Martin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Lloyd-Spets, Anita
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Evaluation of on-line flue gas measurements by MISiCFET and metal-oxide sensors in boilers2005In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 75-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal insulator silicon carbide field-effect transistor sensors, metal-oxide sensors, and a linear Lambda sensor in an electronic nose was used to measure on-line in hot flue gases from a boiler. Flue gas from a 100-MW pellets-fuelled boiler has been used to feed the experimental setup. Several reference instruments, which measure the flue gases in parallel to the sensor array, are connected to the electronic nose. Data was collected during six weeks and then evaluated. Using principal component analysis as the data evaluation method, different operating modes for the boiler have been identified in the data set. The different modes could be described in terms of high or low O 2 and CO concentration. Furthermore, we have shown that it seems possible to use a sensor array to determine the operating mode of the boiler and, by partial least-squares models, measure the CO concentration when the boiler operates in its optimum mode.

  • 19.
    Viter, Roman
    et al.
    Odessa National II Mechnikov University, Ukraine.
    Khranovskyy, Volodymyr
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Starodub, Nikolay
    National University of Life and Environm Science, Ukraine.
    Ogorodniichuk, Yulia
    National University of Life and Environm Science, Ukraine.
    Gevelyuk, Sergey
    Odessa National II Mechnikov University, Ukraine.
    Gertnere, Zanda
    University of Latvia, Latvia.
    Poletaev, Nicolay
    Odessa National II Mechnikov University, Ukraine.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Erts, Donats
    University of Latvia, Latvia.
    Smyntyna, Valentyn
    Odessa National II Mechnikov University, Ukraine.
    Ubelis, Arnolds
    University of Latvia, Latvia.
    Application of Room Temperature Photoluminescence from ZnO Nanorods for Salmonella Detection2014In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 2028-2034Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ZnO nanorods grown by gaseous-disperse synthesis are confirmed by XRD analysis to have the wurtzite crystal structure. The obtained crystallites, as found from SEM studies, are 57 +/- 9 nm in diameter and 470 +/- 30 nm long on the average. Two emission bands of photoluminescence from ZnO nanorods observed at room temperature are centered at 376 and 520 nm. A biosensitive layer is prepared by immobilization of anti-Salmonella antibodies from liquid solutions on the ZnO surface. Immobilization of the biosensitive layer onto ZnO nanorods is found to increase the intensity of PL. After further reaction with Salmonella antigens (Ags), the PL intensity is found to decrease proportional to Ag concentrations in the range of 10(2)-10(5) cell/ml. The possible mechanism of biosensor response is suggested and discussed.

  • 20.
    Wang, Guoliang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Arwin, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jansson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    An optical gas sensor based on ellipsometric readout2003In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 739-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A gas sensor system based on ellipsometric readout is presented. It includes a gas chamber and a compact null ellipsometer operated in off-null mode. Small, low-cost optical components are used to demonstrate that this advanced methodology can be implemented in simplified instrumentation. The off-null ellipsometric sensing principle and transducer mechanisms of the sensing layers, as well as the instrumentation, are described. The application of the sensor system is exampled with experimental results on low-concentration alcoholic gases (methanol, ethanol, and 2-propanol) using porous silicon as a sensing layer. Optimization of the optics of the sensor system, improvement of sensitivity or alteration of selectivity by modification of sensing layers, and multisensing by using several ellipsometric units in parallel are discussed.

  • 21.
    Wingbrant, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svenningstorp, Henrik
    Salomonsson, Per
    Kubinski, David
    Visser, Jacobus H.
    Löfdahl, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Using a MISiC-FET sensor for detecting NH3 in SCR systems2005In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 5, no 5, p. 1099-1105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One way to decrease the emitted levels of NOx from diesel engines is to add NH3 in the form of urea to the exhausts after combustion. NH3 will react with NOx in the catalytic converter to form N2 and water, which is called selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The amount of NH3 added may be regulated through closed-loop control by using an NH3 sensor. The metal-insulator silicon-carbide field-effect transistor (MISiC-FET) sensor has previously been tested for this application and has been shown to be sensitive to NH3. Here, the sensors have been further studied in engine SCR systems. Tests on the cross sensitivity to N2O and NO2, and studies concerning the influence of water vapor have been performed in the laboratory. The difference between Ir and Pt films, with regard to catalytic activity, has also been investigated. The sensors were found to be sensitive to NH3 in diesel engine exhausts. The addition of urea was computer controlled, which made it possible to add NH3 in a stair-like fashion to the system and detect it with the MISiC-FET sensors. The presence of water vapor was shown to have the largest effect on the sensors at low levels and the NH3 response was slightly decreased by a background level of NO2.

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