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  • 1.
    Andersson-Skold, Yvonne
    et al.
    SGI, SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Andersson, Karin
    Chalmers, Dept Energy & Environm, Environm Syst Anal Res Grp, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Lind, Bo
    SGI, SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Claesson, Anna (Nystrom)
    Chalmers, Dept Energy & Environm, Environm Syst Anal Res Grp, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Larsson, Lennart
    SGI, SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Suer, Pascal
    SGI, SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Jacobson, Torbjom
    Coal tar-containing asphalt - Resource or hazardous waste?2007In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 99-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coal tar was used in Sweden for the production of asphalt and for the drenching of stabilization gravel until 1973. The tar has high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), some of which may be strongly carcinogenic. Approximately 20 million tonnes of tar-containing asphalt is present in the public roads in Sweden. Used asphalt from rebuilding can be classified as hazardous waste according to the Swedish Waste Act. The cost of treating the material removed as hazardous waste can be very high due to the large amount that has to be treated, and the total environmental benefit is unclear. The transport of used asphalt to landfill or combustion will affect other environmental targets. The present project, based on three case studies of road projects in Sweden, evaluates the consequences of four scenarios for handling the material: reuse, landfill, biological treatment, and incineration. The results show that reuse of the coal tar-containing materials in new road construction is the most favorable alternative in terms of cost, material use, land use, energy consumption, and air emissions.

  • 2.
    Baas, Leo
    Erasmus Center for Studies in Sustainable Development & Management, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Developing an Industrial Ecosystem in Rotterdam: Learning by … What?2000In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 4-6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Frändegård, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Krook, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svensson, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Resource and Climate Implications of Landfill Mining A Case Study of Sweden2013In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 742-755Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyzes the amount of material deposited in Swedish municipal solid waste landfills, how much is extractable and recyclable, and what the resource and climate implications are if landfill mining coupled with resource recovery were to be implemented in Sweden. The analysis is based on two scenarios with different conventional separation technologies, one scenario using a mobile separation plant and the other using a more advanced stationary separation plant. Further, the approach uses Monte Carlo simulation to address the uncertainties attached to each of the different processes in the scenarios. Results show that Swedens several thousand municipal landfills contain more than 350 million tonnes (t) of material. If landfill mining combined with resource recovery is implemented using a contemporary stationary separation plant, it would be possible to extract about 7 million t of ferrous metals and 2 million t of nonferrous metals, enough to meet the demand of Swedish industry for ferrous and nonferrous metals for three and eight years, respectively. This study further shows that landfill mining could potentially lead to the equivalent of a one-time reduction of about 50 million t of greenhouse gas emissions (carbon-dioxide equivalents), corresponding to 75% of Swedens annual emissions.

  • 4.
    Graff, Pål
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro , Sweden.
    Ståhlbom, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nordenberg, Eva
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery, Finspång, Sweden.
    Graichen, Andreas
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery, Finspång, Sweden.
    Johansson, Pontus
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery, Finspång, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Evaluating Measuring Techniques for Occupational Exposure during Additive Manufacturing of Metals: A Pilot Study2017In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 21, p. 120-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Additive manufacturing that creates three-dimensional objects by adding layer uponlayer of material is a new technique that has proven to be an excellent tool for themanufacturing of complex structures for a variety of industrial sectors. Today, knowl-edge regarding particle emissions and potential exposure-related health hazards forthe operators is limited. The current study has focused on particle numbers, masses,sizes, and identities present in the air during additive manufacturing of metals. Mea-surements were performed during manufacturing with metal powder consisting es-sentially of chromium, nickel, and cobalt. Instruments used were Nanotracer (10 to300 nanometers [nm]), Lighthouse (300 nm to 10 micrometers), and traditional filter-basedparticle mass estimation followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Resultsshowed that there is a risk of particle exposure at certain operations and that particle sizestended to be smaller in recycled metal powder compared to new. In summary, nanosizedparticles were present in the additive manufacturing environment and the operators wereexposed specifically while handling the metal powder. For the workers’ safety, improvedpowder handling systems and measurement techniques for nanosized particles will possiblyhave to be developed and then translated into work environment regulations. Until then,relevant protective equipment and regular metal analyses of urine is recommended

  • 5.
    Löfving, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Grimvall, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Palm, Viveka
    Statistics, Sweden in Stockholm, Sweden.
    Data cubes and matrix formulae for convenient handling of physical flow data2006In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 10, no 1-2, p. 43-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    If the technosphere and the biosphere are divided into cells, the presence and turnover of a substance in a study area can be summarized in a vector of stocks and a matrix of flows between different pairs of cells. Likewise the stocks and flows of several substances or materials in one or more time periods can be summarized in multidimensional data cubes. In this article, we provide a theoretical framework for handling physical flow data, and we demonstrate how a set of matrix operations can facilitate exploratory analysis and quality assessment of such data regardless of the number of substances, materials, and time periods considered. In particular, we show how matrices and cubes of flow data can be recalculated when the collection of cells is modified by joining cells, and also what information is required to recalculate flows when cells are split. Furthermore, we illustrate how and under what circumstances substance-flow data originating from different studies with different collections of cells can be compared or merged. The generic character of the given formulae facilitates the development of software for physical flow data.

  • 6.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Industrial ecology and the boundaries of the manufacturing firm2019In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 1211-1225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decisions on organizational boundaries are critical aspects of manufacturing firms’ business strategies. This article brings together concepts and findings from industrial ecology and business strategy in order to understand how manufacturing firms engage in initiatives to facilitate recycling of process wastes. Based on a distinction between waste recovery and use of the recovered resources, the article introduces a typology of four different strategies: Closed, Outsourcing, Diversification, and Open. Each strategy has a unique set of organizational boundaries and is associated with different motives and benefits for the manufacturing firm. The typology of strategies provides a conceptual contribution to assist industrial managers in strategic decision-making, and to support further studies on organizational boundaries in industrial ecology research.

  • 7.
    Metson, Genevieve
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Department of Natural Resource Science, McGill University, 111 Lackeshore Road, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada.
    Aggarwal, Rimjhim
    School of Sustainability at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona, USA.
    Childers, Daniel L.
    School of Sustainability at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona, USA.
    Efficiency Through Proximity: Changes in Phosphorus Cycling at the Urban–Agricultural Interface of a Rapidly Urbanizing Desert Region2012In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 914-927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In tightly coupled socioecological systems, such as cities, the interactions between socio-economic and biophysical characteristics of an area strongly influence ecosystem function. Very often the effects of socioeconomic activities on ecosystem function are unintended, but can impact the sustainability of a city and can have irreversible effects. The food system in its entirety, from production to treatment of human waste, is one of the most important contributors to the way phosphorus (P) cycles through cities. In this article we examined the changes in P dynamics at the urbanï¿œagricultural interface of the Phoenix, Arizona, USA, metropolitan area between 1978 and 2008. We found that the contribution of cotton to harvested P decreased while the contribution of alfalfa, which is used as feed for local dairy cows, increased over the study period. This change in cropping pattern was accompanied by growth in the dairy industry and increased internal recycling of P due to dairy cow manure application to alfalfa fields and the local recycling of biosolids and treated wastewater. The proximity of urban populations with dairies and feed production and low runoff in this arid climate have facilitated this serendipitous recycling. Currently P is not strongly regulated or intentionally managed in this system, but farmers’ behaviors, shaped largely by market forces and policies related to water recycling, unintentionally affect P cycling. This underscores the need to move from unintentional to deliberate and holistic management of P dynamics through collaborations between practitioners and researchers in order to enhance urban sustainability.

  • 8.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fargnoli, Mario
    Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering of the University of Rome “La Sapienza,” Italy.
    Customization in Ecodesign: A Demand-Side Approach Bringing New Opportunities?2010In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 529-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 9.
    Svensson, Niclas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    McLaren, Jake
    Centre for Environmental Strategy, University of Surrey, UK.
    Jackson, Tim
    Centre for Environmental Strategy,University of Surrey, UK.
    Material and Energy flow Analysis of Paper consumption in the United Kingdom2002In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 5 3, p. 89-105Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Wallsten, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Toward Social Material Flow Analysis: On the Usefulness of Boundary Objects in Urban Mining Research2015In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 742-752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Material flow analysis (MFA) has been an effective tool to identify the scale of physical activity, the allocation of materials across economic sectors for different purposes, and to identify inefficiencies in production systems or in urban contexts. However, MFA relies on ignoring the social drivers of those flows to be able to perform its calculations. In many cases therefore, it remains detached from the processes (e.g., urban) that underpin them. This becomes a problem when the purpose of research is to inform the design of detailed recycling schemes, for which micro-level practice knowledge on how material flows are mediated by human agency is needed. The aim of this article is to demonstrate how a particular social science approach, namely, infrastructure studies (IS), can be combined with MFA to enhance the latters potential as a decision support tool. To achieve a successful combination between IS and MFA, the object of inquiry must be carefully defined to function as a boundary object, which allows academic approaches to work together without the need for consensus. This approach is illustrated with a case study example in urban mining research that assesses the hibernating stock of subsurface urban infrastructure in Norrkoping, Sweden. It provides an example of how a well-calibrated MFA and a complementary social science approach can provide hands-on advice for private as well as public actors in a local and place-specific context. The article aims to advance the integration of social science and the study of the physical economy to contribute to the emerging field of social industrial ecology.

  • 11.
    Wikström, Fredrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Verghese, Karli
    School of Design, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Auras, Rafael
    School of Packaging, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.
    Olsson, Annika
    Department of Design Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Williams, Helén
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Grönman, Kaisa
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Lappeenranta, Finland.
    Pettersen, Marit Kvalvåg
    Nofima, Norway.
    Møller, Hanne
    Ostfold Research, Kråkerøy, Norway.
    Soukka, Risto
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Lappeenranta, Finland.
    Packaging Strategies That Save Food: A Research Agenda for 20302019In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 532-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thoroughly considering and optimizing packaging systems can avoid food loss and waste.

    We suggest a number of issues that must be explored and review the associated challenges.

    Five main issues were recognized through the extensive experience of the authors and engagement

    of multiple stakeholders. The issues promoted are classified as follows: (1) identify

    and obtain specific data of packaging functions that influence food waste; (2) understand

    the total environmental burden of product/package by considering the trade-off between

    product protection and preservation and environmental footprint; (3) develop understanding

    of how these functions should be treated in environmental footprint evaluations; (4)

    improve packaging design processes to also consider reducing food waste; and (5) analyze

    stakeholder incentives to reduce food loss and waste. Packaging measures that save food

    will be important to fulfill the United Nations Sustainable Development goal to halve per

    capita global food waste at the retail and consumer levels and to reduce food losses along

    production and supply chains.

1 - 11 of 11
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