liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Dennison, M. J.
    et al.
    Cranfield University, Bedford, UK.
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Biosensors for environmental monitoring1995In: Biotechnology Advances, ISSN 0734-9750, E-ISSN 1873-1899, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1-12Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing environmental legislation which controls the release and the levels of certain chemicals in the environment has created a need for reliable monitoring of these substances in air, soil and especially water. Conventional analytical techniques, although highly precise, suffer from the disadvantages of high cost, the need for trained personnel and the fact that they are mostly laboratory bound. Biosensors because of their specificity, fast response times, low cost, portability, ease of use and a continuous real time signal, can present distinct advantages in certain cases. Their biological base makes them ideal for toxicological measurements which are suited for health and safety applications. Over the last 3–4 years there has been an increase in the number of publications concerning biosensors for environmental monitoring, especially in the field of pesticide measurements.

  • 2.
    Sekretaryova, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bioelectrocatalytic systems for health applications2016In: Biotechnology Advances, ISSN 0734-9750, E-ISSN 1873-1899, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 177-197Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a brief overview of bioelectrocatalytic devices for in vitro health applications, including food safety and environmental analysis, focusing on microelectrode- and microfluidic-based biosensors, paper-based point-of-care devices and wearable biosensors. The main hurdles and future perspectives are discussed. We then consider the role of electron transfer between a biocatalyst and an electrode in biosensor design. Brief descriptions of indirect, direct and mediated mechanisms are given. The principal strategies, as well as recent developments for modulation of electron transfer in biocatalytic systems are summarised. In conclusion, we highlight some of the challenges associated with improving these redox systems.

  • 3.
    Shionoya, Kiseko
    et al.
    NEC CorporationTokyo, Japan.
    Saito, Atsushi
    NEC CorporationTokyo, Japan.
    Immobilized enzyme film, protein immobilized film and process for forming the same: Patent abstracts. Patent No. 53567571995In: Biotechnology Advances, ISSN 0734-9750, E-ISSN 1873-1899, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 300-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disclosed are an immobilized enzyme film, characterized in that said film is formed using an enzyme solution prepared by adding 1 to 3 parts by weight of a 50 to 100 wt % water-soluble crosslinking agent having at least two epoxy groups in the molecule and 1 to 3 parts by weight of a 1 to 2 wt % glutaraldehyde to 1 to 3 parts by weight of a 10 to 50 wt % aqueous protein solution containing an enzyme, and a process for forming the same on an ion-sensitive field effect transistor. The thus formed immobilized enzyme film is of an uniform thickness and stable by virtue of its increased hydrophilicity and higher elasticity, whereby deactivation of the enzyme to be caused by the shrinkage of the film can be prevented.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf