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  • 1.
    Broitman, Esteban
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Indentation Hardness Measurements at Macro-, Micro-, and Nanoscale: A Critical Overview2017In: Tribology letters, ISSN 1023-8883, E-ISSN 1573-2711, Vol. 65, no 1Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Brinell, Vickers, Meyer, Rockwell, Shore, IHRD, Knoop, Buchholz, and nanoindentation methods used to measure the indentation hardness of materials at different scales are compared, and main issues and misconceptions in the understanding of these methods are comprehensively reviewed and discussed. Basic equations and parameters employed to calculate hardness are clearly explained, and the different international standards for each method are summarized. The limits for each scale are explored, and the different forms to calculate hardness in each method are compared and established. The influence of elasticity and plasticity of the material in each measurement method is reviewed, and the impact of the surface deformation around the indenter on hardness values is examined. The difficulties for practical conversions of hardness values measured by different methods are explained. Finally, main issues in the hardness interpretation at different scales are carefully discussed, like the influence of grain size in polycrystalline materials, indentation size effects at micro-and nanoscale, and the effect of the substrate when calculating thin films hardness. The paper improves the understanding of what hardness means and what hardness measurements imply at different scales.

  • 2.
    Eklund, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Palmquist, Jens-Petter
    Uppsala universitet.
    Wilhelmsson, Ola
    Uppsala universitet.
    Jansson, Ulf
    Uppsala universitet.
    Emmerlich, Jens
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Högberg, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Comment on "Pulsed laser deposition and properties of Mn+1AXx phase formulated Ti3SiC2 thin films"2004In: Tribology letters, ISSN 1023-8883, E-ISSN 1573-2711, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 977-978Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A recent paper by Hu et al. claimed synthesis of the MAX-phase Ti3SiC2at 100-300 °C using pulsed laser deposition. In this comment, we find that the evidence presented by Hu et al. is insufficient to show Ti3SiC2 formation. In fact, there is a simpler interpretation of their results from X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, namely that the material produced is a cubic TiC-based compound.

  • 3.
    Eklund, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Palmquist, JP
    Department of Materials Chemistry, The Angström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Swede.
    Wilhelmsson, O
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jansson, U
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Emmerlich, Jens
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Högberg, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Comment on "Pulsed laser deposition and properties of M(n+1)AX(x) phase formulated Ti3SiC2 thin films''2004In: Tribology letters, ISSN 1023-8883, E-ISSN 1573-2711, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 977-978p. 977-978Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A recent paper by Hu et al. claimed synthesis of the MAX-phase Ti3SiC2 at 100 - 300 degreesC using pulsed laser deposition. In this comment, we find that the evidence presented by Hu et al. is insufficient to show Ti3SiC2 formation. In fact, there is a simpler interpretation of their results from X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, namely that the material produced is a cubic TiC-based compound.

  • 4.
    Lauridsen, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mannerbro, R
    ABB Components, Sweden.
    Andersson, A M
    ABB Corp Research.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Microstructural and Chemical Analysis of AgI Coatings Used as a Solid Lubricant in Electrical Sliding Contacts2012In: Tribology letters, ISSN 1023-8883, E-ISSN 1573-2711, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 187-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AgI coatings have been deposited by electroplating on Ag-plated Cu coupons. Electron microscopy shows that the coatings consist of weakly agglomerated AgI grains. X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry, and mass spectrometry show that the AgI exhibits a reversible transformation from hexagonal to cubic phase at 150 A degrees C. AgI starts to decompose at 150 A degrees C with an accelerating rate up to the AgI melting temperature (555 A degrees C), where a complex-bonded hydroxide evaporates. Ag pin-on-disk testing shows that the iodine addition to Ag decreases the friction coefficient from 1.2 to similar to 0.4. The contact resistance between AgI and Ag becomes less than 100 mu I (c) after similar to 500 operations as the AgI deagglomerates, and Ag is exposed on the surface and remains low during at least 10,000 reciprocating operations. This makes AgI suitable as a solid lubricant in electrical contacts.

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