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  • 1.
    Adrodegari, Federico
    et al.
    University of Brescia, Italy.
    Saccani, Nicola
    University of Brescia, Italy.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Hanken School Econ, Finland.
    Vilo, Jyrki
    KINE Robot Solut, Finland.
    PSS business model conceptualization and application2017In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 28, no 15, p. 1251-1263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The discussion about business models has gained considerable attention in the last decade. Business model frameworks have been developed in the literature as management methods helping companies to comprehend and analyse their current business logic and guide the deployment of new strategies. In response to calls for a deeper understanding of the application of a business model approach to product-service systems (PSS), this study develops a two-level hierarchical framework that (i) includes a set of components with pertinent, second-order variables to take into account when undergoing the shift from products to solutions; (ii) supports industrial companies, especially SMEs, in designing their future business model and in consistently planning the actions needed to implement it. The framework was applied and refined within real-life settings. The application to KINE - a robot solutions supplier - shows how key challenges faced by servitization firms may be thoroughly addressed through the adoption of a business model perspective.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-08-17 17:02
  • 2.
    Aguilar Sommar, Ruth
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Production Economics.
    Poler, R.
    GIP Research Centre, Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia, Spain, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Research Centre on Production Management and Engineering (CIGIP), European Operations Management Association (EurOMA), Production and Operations Management Society (POMS), Association for the Organisation Engineering (ADINGOR).
    Integrated analysis of the production planning process using Trampolin and DGRAI as process modelling tools2006In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 31-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides managers and other decision-makers with support on how to analyse business processes by presenting the use and features of Trampolin and DGRAI as complementary tools for the analysis of business processes to support enterprise integration. Two business process models were built for the production planning process in a large telecommunication company one using Trampolin and the other using DGRAI. The former offers a statistical analysis of the process showing the information required, responsible and other features of each activity along the process besides its links and sequence. The second gives a more dynamic analysis focusing on the process' decisional flow and its associated information and resources permitting to simulate and analyse the consequences of the decision-making process. A brief description of what may be analysed with each tool followed by analytical insights, and an analysis of how these tools support enterprise integration, are provided. Also the paper shows the advantages and disadvantages of each tool as well as some common and complementary characteristics found in the models.

  • 3.
    Comstock, Mica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Winroth, Mats
    Department of Industrial Engineering, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    From mass production to mass customization: enabling perspectives from the Swedish mobile telephone industry2004In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 362-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much has been written about the conceptual nature of mass customization, and the success of several best business practitioners in the area have been well documented. Most companies, however, are not textbook examples of best practice, but rather are making incremental progress towards mass customization based on a mass-production heritage. This paper presents the findings of a case study that investigated a mass customization initiative at a leading mobile telephone manufacturer in Sweden. The primary objective of the study was to determine the implications of a radically new manufacturing initiative for the company – the production of a customized, entry-level mobile telephone. The differences between the traditional scenario of the mass production of standardized products at the company and that of the new customized production were also sought. The findings of the study, which are presented using the product, process and system perspectives, are aided by a number of customization-related frameworks from the literature. The discussion includes the impact of moving the customization order point downstream in the value chain in terms of increased efficiency and reduced lead times, the reduced requirement for manufacturing flexibility with shifting production system boundaries, and the company's status as a mass customizer.

  • 4.
    Errasti, Ander
    et al.
    Natra Grp, Spain.
    Rudberg, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Corti, Donatella
    University of Appl Science and Arts Southern Switzerland, Switzerland.
    Editorial Material: Managing international operations: configuration of production network for SMEs in PRODUCTION PLANNING and CONTROL, vol 26, issue 9, pp 691-6922015In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 26, no 9, p. 691-692Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 5.
    Feldmann, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Olhager, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Designing and managing manufacturing networks: a survey of Swedish plants2009In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 101-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design and management of the manufacturing network for a firm is an important factor for its competitive position. By manufacturing network we mean the plant or plants of a manufacturing firm and the relationships with external suppliers. The way that these operate together is crucial for supporting the competition of the products in the marketplace. This article presents the results of a survey of 106 Swedish manufacturing plants. We find that the markets and supply networks of Swedish plants are global, but there is a focus on Europe. The main reason for locating a plant in Sweden is proximity to skills and knowledge, and we find no pure low-cost plants. The overall level of site competence is very high. There are many significant differences between how internal and external suppliers are selected. The choice of internal suppliers, i.e. those suppliers in the manufacturing network that belong to the same firm, is to a large extent based on a single corporate decision reflecting quality and competence, while external suppliers are chosen based on quality, price and delivery dependability considerations. This study provides a broad analysis of the manufacturing networks in which Swedish plants operate, and the roles of these plants.

  • 6.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonsson, Patrik
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    The impact of knowledge properties on international manufacturing transfer performanceIn: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines how knowledge properties of a manufacturing activity transfer in international manufacturing network impact performance during the transfer itself and after steady state has been reached. With the aid of survey data from 178 companies, we use hierarchical regression to test the relationships. It is found that knowledge properties as a group significantly affect both performance measures when controlling for the effects of sender unit experience, sender unit size and receiver unit experience. The activities transferred thus impact the success of the transfer. The control variables of sender unit experience and receiver unit experience have their relatively strongest performance effects after steady state has been reached. Testing the performance effects of single knowledge property dimensions, we identify independency to have the strongest relative performance effect, which validates and advances previous research. This is one of the first survey studies to cover both the performance of the transfer itself and after reaching steady state of manufacturing transfers. Several strands of further research are therefore identified.  

  • 7.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Division of Logistics and Transportation, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wänström, Carl
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Johansson, Mats I.
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Medbo, Lars
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    A structured procedure for materials planning during production transfer2015In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 26, no 9, p. 738-752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores materials planning procedures to ensure the materials’ availability during production transfers. The paper defines a production transfer as the preparation, physical transfer, and start-up of relocated production. A structured procedure of materials planning during production transfer is developed based on theory, and then validated and refined based on the analysis of four case studies. The paper shows that there is a need for a structured procedure of materials planning during production transfers. It also explains the importance of activities that create prerequisites for the materials’ availability during production transfer, such as updating and adapting documentation, planning and control systems, and describes the activities that ensure the materials’ availability, such as preventive and corrective actions. A valid estimation of the time needed to reach a steady state and a combination of several preventive actions improves the ability to ensure that materials are available. The cases showed differences across company size, because large companies took more and farther-reaching preventive actions.

  • 8.
    Karltun, Johan
    et al.
    Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Berglund, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Contextual conditions influencing the schedulers work at a sawmill2010In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 359-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study addresses the issue of how contextual conditions influence scheduling work in practice at a sawmill in Sweden. Based on observations and interviews, activity analysis was used to study the work activities of the main scheduler. It is shown how the contextual conditions related to constraints, either in the technical system and the technical scheduling tools used by the scheduler or in the social system, delimit the possible ways for the scheduler to perform his work. It is furthermore illustrated how the scheduler sometimes used the contextual conditions as a means to control the sawmill production. Moreover, the presence of the numerous uncertainties in the production process is shown. Finally, the study demonstrates that the schedulers thorough knowledge, experience, and skills of both the technical and the social systems had immense influence in his ability to perform during daily scheduling work.

  • 9.
    Liu, Weihua
    et al.
    Tianjin University, Peoples R China.
    Zhao, Xuan
    Tianjin University, Peoples R China.
    Tang, Ou
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Xu, Haitao
    Tianjin University, Peoples R China.
    Impacts of demand and supply factors on the capacity scheduling performance of logistics service supply chain with mass customisation service modes: an empirical study from China2017In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 28, no 9, p. 727-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies the influence of the demand-supply environment on the capacity scheduling performance of the logistics service supply chain. According to the key characteristics of the demand-supply environment, the cases of five Chinese companies were introduced and cross-analysed, then research hypotheses were developed. After receiving 154 valid questionnaires and testing our hypotheses, some key conclusions were obtained. From the aspect of demand, there is a positive correlation between the customised levels of demand and the scheduling cost of logistics service integrators but a negative correlation between the customised levels of demand and the scheduling flexibility; From the aspect of supply, a higher self-support ratio of logistics source and a higher sourcing integrity of logistics service integrators will lead to a higher scheduling cost and a lower scheduling flexibility; a whole-process performance evaluation is a moderator, which will positively improve the impact of the whole process scheduling performance.

  • 10.
    Lofberg, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Service manoeuvres to overcome challenges of servitisation in a value network2015In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 26, no 14-15, p. 1188-1197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When manufacturing firms increase the share of service revenues, managing service provision becomes challenging. This study extends previous research on servitisation in individual firms by analysing the challenges service provision creates in a value network. The challenges are identified both within the firms and in the business relationships in the value network. In addition, the paper identifies and describes service manoeuvres firms use to address challenges resulting from servitisation. This case study of a value network is based on interviews carried out at 13 firms in the automotive industry, including suppliers, original equipment manufacturers and consultancies. The research shows that service manoeuvres, such as new types of resource integration and value constellations, are used to overcome challenges in the value network.

  • 11.
    Martinez, Sandra
    et al.
    GLOBOPE Research and Consulting, Spain.
    Errasti, Ander
    NATRA Grp, Spain.
    Rudberg, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Adapting Zaras Pronto Moda to a value brand retailer2015In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 26, no 9, p. 723-737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The clothing sector is currently characterised by frequent assortment rotation in stores, a quick response product development and a focus on minimising end-of-campaign stock levels. This paper is based on a case study carried out at a value brand retailer, with a purpose to show how the company increased competitiveness in a market requiring more responsiveness. The case presented shows that the establishment of an adequate supply strategy for differentiated product segments, the introduction of mini-collections, the redesign of business processes (especially the new product development and the order fulfilment processes) and the redesign of the supply chain, lead to a sales increase and purchasing savings. Moreover, the study treats how a value brand retailer, facing different supply chain challenges compared with the leading brands, balance global and local production, lean and agile manufacturing and how it is possible to abandon the traditional two-campaign paradigm in favour of more rapid replenishment.

  • 12.
    Olhager, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Production Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Linking manufacturing strategy and production planning and control2003In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 485-486Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 13.
    Olhager, Jan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Production Economics.
    Supply chain management: A just-in-time perspective2002In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 681-687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Just-in-time (JIT) has been a widely recognized production philosophy alternative since the early 1980s. JIT principles and techniques have been widely adopted in many manufacturing firms. More recently, supply chain management has evolved as a discipline focusing on the design, planning and control of processes linking the initial raw materials to the ultimate consumption of the finished product. Supply chain efficiency is dependent on the efficiencies of the individual manufacturing organizations and the ability to connect along the supply chain. In this paper supply chain management from a JIT perspective is investigated, focusing on the linking mechanisms between successive companies and the collective efficiency of the supply chain.

  • 14.
    Olhager, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics .
    Persson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Simulating production and inventory control systems: a learning approach to operational excellence2006In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 113-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The search for operational excellence includes both a thorough understanding of the nature of the manufacturing operations and a choice of the right production and inventory control system for the environment in which it will operate. Understanding the nature of manufacturing operations can be facilitated by simulating the manufacturing system, so that the interrelationships among parameters can be studied. Production and inventory control systems can be simulated together with the physical manufacturing environment in order to enhance the understanding of the behaviour of a particular control system and also to facilitate the selection of control systems for the manufacturing system under study. In this paper we report on the design and learning effects of using simulation for investigating the behaviour and impact of different production and inventory control systems in a manufacturing system. We discuss the structure and simulation perspectives of production and inventory control systems. We provide a review of the benefits of using simulation for learning the manufacturing environment, and the related testing of alternative control systems.

  • 15.
    Olhager, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics .
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Production Economics.
    Production planning and control tools2000In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 210-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are numerous tools available to be used for production planning and control purposes. The number of tools is ever increasing, and so are the levels of sophistication as well as complexity. For the specific manufacturing firm, the task of selecting the most appropriate set of tools is not trivial. However, in recent years, the understanding of the relationship between tools and manufacturing environments for which they are suitable has increased. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of production planning and control tools available today, as well as new trends, issues and ideas.

  • 16.
    Rudberg, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Production Economics.
    Mass customization in terms of the customer order decoupling point2004In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 445-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years the customer order decoupling point (CODP) has gained increased acceptance as an important concept when organizing value-adding activities in production and logistics. The CODP, which is defined as the point in the value-adding material flow that separates decisions made under uncertainty from decisions made under certainty concerning customer demand, is however normally only used for production- and distribution- related activities. Here we adjust the typical CODP typology and show how the engineering resources can be integrated with the production process so as to take the features of mass customization environments into account. This paper also examines existing mass customization frameworks and offers a more thorough and nuanced typology for classifying various levels of mass customization. Finally, the adjusted CODP typology is used as a foundation for developing a reliable order promise process for mass customizers.

  • 17.
    Thunberg, Micael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Using the SCOR model’s performance measurements to improve construction logistics2014In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 25, no 13/14, p. 1056-1078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, construction material supplier and construction site performance are assessed according to the supply chain operations reference (SCOR) model. Current applicable literature focuses mainly on assessing the main contractor’s ability to construct a building according to customer requirements, i.e. construction performance. Omitting supplier performance when evaluating construction performance reduces the ability to improve the construction supply chain, as reasons for cost and time overruns and quality deficiencies will often be overlooked. In this paper, the SCOR metrics perfect order fulfilment (POF), source cycle time (SCT) and cost to source(CS) are measured to assess construction supplier reliability and construction site responsiveness. The values for POF, SCT and CS are measured to be 38%, 134 min and EUR 249, respectively. The practical implications are summarised in five improvement suggestions concerning communication, predefined material allocation, supplier performance assessment, delivery verification and notification and use of the SCOR model.

  • 18.
    Wikner, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Noroozi, Sayeh
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A modularised typology for flow design based on decoupling points - a holistic view on process industries and discrete manufacturing industries2016In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 27, no 16, p. 1344-1355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Management of production activities covers a wide range of decisions. In this paper, a modularised approach is suggested that, through configuration, generates a case-specific flow design. The approach is based on identification of decision categories that are generic and fundamental in the flow design, covering both discrete manufacturing industries and process industries. Each decision category identifies a unique property of the flow which changes at a particular point: this is termed a decoupling point. A three-dimensional modularised typology is developed by combining three different decision categories. Cases from the steel industry and the tooling industry are used to illustrate how the typology can be applied. The modularised approach provides a typology for the application of both qualitative and quantitative methods for flow management, including planning, control and performance management.

  • 19.
    Wikner, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Yang, Biao
    University of Sussex, England.
    Yang, Ying
    Newcastle University, England.
    Williams, Sharon J.
    Swansea University, Wales.
    Decoupling thinking in service operations: a case in healthcare delivery system design2017In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 387-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of decoupling thinking has been well established in the manufacturing operations and supply chain management literature. This paper explores how this decoupling thinking can be applied in service operations and in particular in health care. It first reviews the relevant literature on decoupling fundamentals, the front- and back-office distinction, and new emerging decoupling thinking in service operations. Subsequently, a flow-based framework including content and process is developed for decoupling thinking in service operations. The framework provides an integrated perspective on customer contact, flow driver and flow differentiation (level of customisation). The framework hence, through flow differentiation, introduces the concept of standardisation versus customisation in a service context. This is followed by a health care case example to illustrate how the framework can be applied. The managerial implications are primarily in terms of a modularised approach to system design and management. The framework offers potential for benchmarking with other service systems as well as with manufacturing systems based on the shared foundation in decoupling thinking. Finally, suggestions are provided for further research opportunities derived from this research.

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