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  • 1.
    Aronsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies.
    Danska museer i upplevelseekonomin2008In: Nordisk kulturpolitisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-3216, E-ISSN 2000-8325, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 185-190Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Beckman, Svante
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies.
    Den svenska arbetarrörelsen och kulturpolitiken2008In: Nordisk kulturpolitisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-3216, E-ISSN 2000-8325, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 136-146Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

     I recensionen av Per Sundgrens avhandling i idéhistoria görs först en översikt av avhandlingens innehåll och de resultat och teser författaren redovisar. Därefter diskuteras några punkter där Sungrens resultat kan ifrågasättas. Avslutningsvis ges ett berömmande allmänt onmdöme.  

  • 3.
    Beckman, Svante
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    En oregerlig norsk museipolitisk historia: Recension: Et urejerli mangfold? Lokale og regionale museer som saksfeld i norsk kulturpolitikk 1900 - cirka 1970, av Lise Emilie Fosmo Talleras2009In: Nordisk kulturpolitisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-3216, E-ISSN 2000-8325, no 2, p. 203-209Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Bjurström, Erling
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Svenska Rikskonserter och kulturpolitikens estetik2018In: Nordisk kulturpolitisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-3216, E-ISSN 2000-8325, Vol. 21, no 1-2018, p. 73-93Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although aesthetics, primarily in the shape of the arts, can be seen as the raison d’etreof cultural policy, it is seldom in the forefront of cultural policy research. This article focuses on the aesthetics of Concerts Sweden, which was founded in 1968 and closed down in 2010. With the aim to give high quality music to all citizens around the country and its concentration on mobile concerts and the production of records, Concerts Sweden initially rested on a Bildung aesthetics thoroughly elaborated in the white papers underlying its foundation. This Bildung aesthetics was based on classical views on Bildung and the emergence of modern theories of aesthetics, from the late eighteenth century by foremost Immanuel Kant and Friedrich Schiller. Kant changed the way of looking at aesthetics, but in the 20th century his view on the a priori based universal character of aesthetical judgment lost its prior credibility. This is also reflected in the restricted aesthetic claims of most national cultural policies during the century, and in the history of Concerts Sweden (Svenska Rikskonserter), which musical-aesthetic platform changed when the aim to “counteract the negative effects of commercialism” was introduced as one of the goals of the new Swedish national cultural policy in 1974. With the support of this goal Concerts Sweden drifted away from the Bildung aesthetics prescribed for it in the white papers when it was founded, but without explicitly abandoning it. The history of Concerts Sweden shows that aesthetics had a stronger position in Swedish cultural policy prior to its reorganization in the 1970s, when it became more subordinated to political viewpoints. From this point of view, the Swedish cultural policy of music successively takes on a post-aesthetic character from the 1970s, in the sense that it no longer takes principle stands in matters of aesthetics, except in pragmatic ways, as when it for example comes to the assignment of subsidies based on judgments of aesthetical values or qualities.

  • 5.
    Flisbäck, Marita
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Work-family Conflict among Professional Visual Artists in Sweden: Gender Differences in the Influence of Parenting and Household Responsibilities2013In: Nordisk kulturpolitisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-3216, E-ISSN 2000-8325, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 239-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores contemporary Swedish artists’ experiences of work–family conflict from a gender perspective. Sweden is a critical case as the country is well-known for its official gender equality policy stressing the importance of possibilities for women and men to balance family and paid work. The analysis of survey data collected from 2,025 Swedish professional visual artists shows their self-reported levels of work–family conflict to be generally low. Women artists, however, were found to experience more conflict than men artists. The results suggest that women face more pressure from the demands of both work and home than men. While an OLS regression analysis showed a relationship between the artists’ parenting responsibility and their perceived level of work–family conflict overall, for men artists this was so only at the second child. An unequal division of housework had negative consequences for women artists’ work–family balance, while the effect of being single was in this regard more pronounced among men than among women. This suggests that men, to a greater extent than women, depend on a spouse to handle the balance between work and family. Although much has happened regarding the gender issues in the art world, patterns of dependence and traditional gender roles in work and caring thus continue to persist, limiting individuals’ choices and actual ability to work as an artist, especially for women.

  • 6.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Advanced Cultural Studies Institute of Sweden.
    Networks in borderlands: Movements, public spheres and subcultures as innovators of creativity governance2008In: Nordisk kulturpolitisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-3216, E-ISSN 2000-8325, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 55-69Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Harding, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    IT-revolutionen och den svenska kulturens politik: Uppfattningar om ”ny teknik” i svensk kultur- och mediepolitik 1991–19982006In: Nordisk kulturpolitisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-3216, E-ISSN 2000-8325, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 155-179Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Harding, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Recension: Nationalism and the Mind. Essays on Modern Culture2007In: Nordisk kulturpolitisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-3216, E-ISSN 2000-8325, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 168-171Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Harding, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Var finns den statliga kulturpolitiken? Inte bara på kulturdepartementet2009In: Nordisk kulturpolitisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-3216, E-ISSN 2000-8325, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 175-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to compare how the Swedish national government organizes its relationship to culture (seen as a distinct sphere in society) in the various relevant ministries and policy areas. It is noted that the Ministry of Culture is not, as often is assumed, responsible for most of the government’s policies directed at this sphere, neither are its policies representative of the government’s policies towards culture. This explicit cultural policy does, however, have certain characteristics when compared to how other ministries relate to culture. Explicit cultural policy is primarily concerned with professional culture consecrated in the art field, as well as by a normative concept of autonomy for that field. While autonomy also exists in parts of the cultural sphere financed by other ministries and actors, it can take very different forms. Government policy on culture appears to be highly dependent on how responsibility for it is shared between ministries and other actors. These borders are often examples of historical path dependency. It is thus important that cultural policy research do not limit itself to explicit cultural policy, but also that it takes note of the borders between areas of responsibility in government and other relevant organizations, and how these influences cultural policy.

  • 10.
    Möller, Per
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kulturens inflytande och utflytande: Aspektpolitik i staden2009In: Nordisk kulturpolitisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-3216, E-ISSN 2000-8325, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 127-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract (In english)

    The flow and flow out of culture: ”Aspect policy” in the city.

    The celebration of culture expressed in notions of ”the experience economy” and alike involves a problematic tendency. On the one hand, culture is becoming more central to economy and policy making. On the other hand, culture is exposed to constraining economic and political claims. Especially noticeable on local and regional level, culture and cultural policy is in many cases integrated with an overall policy aimed at economic growth. The project is crucial for urban regimes using culture as a resource to stage the city as an attractive brand. However, when culture hereby is valued through what experience and attractiveness it brings to the city-as-brand, the very understanding of culture is negotiated.

    This article has its focus on urban regeneration in Malmö, the third largest city in Sweden. My interest is here focused on how culture is viewed upon and valuated by city officials and how it is represented in policy documents. The article also takes a starting-point in the promotion of ”aspect policy” in the 2009 report of the Swedish Committee of Inquiry on Cultural Policy.

    By this, the report stresses a need to integrate culture and cultural policy, as an aspect or dimension, in other policy areas, and to a lesser degree consider it to be an isolated sector. I will argue that such a view, well established in urban regeneration policies, tend to weaken the already precarious situation of the traditionally defined cultural sector. Furthermore, the same logic has profound democratic and, in the broadest sense, cultural implications regarding citizenship. When the city-as-brand is staged it is primarily promoted as a consumerable product for markets outside of the city. Meanwhile it invokes a certain ”way of life” among the public by shaping a culture and citizenship founded on the commodofication of place.

  • 11.
    Nordvall, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Malmström, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Den folkligt bildade politikern: Akademiska kunskaper och det symboliska kapitalets logik inom den socialdemokratiska riksdagsgruppen i Sverige2015In: Nordisk kulturpolitisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-3216, E-ISSN 2000-8325, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 233-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Globally speaking, parliamentarians tend to be more highly educated than their average constituent. In some countries, such as Great Britain and France, there is also a clear link between political power and some certain educational institutions, such as Cambridge and Oxford, which have become important roads to a successful political career. The Swedish political elite differs from this pattern. Even though Swedish parliamentarians generally have a higher education than the average Swede, having an academic education has not been a necessity for a successful political career. This is particularly evident in the Social Democratic Party, which is Sweden’s largest party. Non-academic educational pathways have been of great importance. Historically, popular education, particularly certain «folk high schools», have served as an alternative educational portal for politicians. Is this still the case? What forms of education and knowledge are currently important portals for entering the political elite in Sweden? This paper explores these questions, using interviews with Social Democratic MPs and data from Statistics Sweden on MPs' educational background. Bourdieu's concept of symbolic capital is used to analyze how different skills and educational experiences confer value within the Social Democratic Party. The results show that there are a number of different types of knowledge and experience that are considered of great value. The value of academic knowledge exhibits a great deal of ambivalence. In terms of exchange value (e.g. academic degrees), academic knowledge is conferred low value and is often downplayed narratively. At the same time, however, in terms of use value, academic knowledge is acknowledged to have considerable utility as academic education is seen to facilitate the reading of political documents that forms a large part of MPs' daily lives. The results also suggest that non-formal education still appears to be a highly valued educational pathway to political power in Sweden.

  • 12.
    Rindzeviciute, Egle
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    From Authoritarian to Democratic Cultural Policy: Making Sense of De-Sovietisation in Lithuania after 19902009In: Nordisk kulturpolitisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-3216, E-ISSN 2000-8325, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 191-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article deals with discourses on governance in cultural policy in a context of radical political change. Drawing on an in-depth analysis of qualitative interviews, it explores how the meaning of “Soviet” cultural policy was retrospectively constructed by Lithuanian cultural operators as they talked about the post-1990 democratisation. The informants mobilised a complex discursive strategy of alienation and defamiliarisation which made sense of Soviet cultural policy and reconciled change with preservation of its elements. Particular attention is paid to the ways in which the informants perceived the changes in the distribution of power in which was associated with decentralisation reforms. The findings suggest that the distinction between authoritarian and democratic cultural policy models to a large extent came to be constructed in rather utilitarian terms and was strongly dependent on the contemporary practical issues. The conclusion therefore suggests we avoid essentialising the categories “authoritarian” and “democratic” in the theoretical construction of state cultural policy models. Instead, it points out that it is vital to examine the components of these categories as a subject of historically situated discursive negotiations.

  • 13.
    Stenöien, Jorun M
    et al.
    Institutt for voksnes laering og rådgivningvitenskap (IVR), NTNU, Trondheim.
    Laginder, Ann-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Praktisk-estetisk laeringsinteresse - en motkulturell verdi?2015In: Nordisk kulturpolitisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-3216, E-ISSN 2000-8325, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 182-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we will focus on which cultural values that people´s interest in practical-aesthetic learning activities have in the common busy and splinted society. Dance and crafts is neither necessary nor understood as useful knowledge in our time. Transmission and safeguarding of these kind of knowledge and skills often arise as a result of chosen and interest based learning and through participation in organizations and different forms of study activity (formal, un-formal and informal) in a landscape of volunteerism. Practical-aesthetic learning activities are categorized as leisure and hobby due to their existence within the organizations of voluntary sector and offered as part of the study organizations training courses. That does not always be true for the persons that are active and participating in this landscape.

    It is people’s interest and choice of practical- aesthetic activity and its role in our time that is in focus in this article. Why do people choose to deepening in and continue learn dance and crafts? What is the cultural political significance of this interest? In contemporary time it seems like a paradox that people choose to deepen an interest that rests on values contradicting the dominant values in society. What does this tell about this phenomenon’s potential as a countercultural value?

    The characteristics of the informants’ lifestyle are interpreted as a potential counterculture. This way of living are based on values of time, skill, usefulness and meaning different from those asked for in the new capitalism. Practical-aesthetic learning activities cultural values are complex and political overarching. Learning takes place in the intersection between several political sectors, such as education, cultural, social and environmental issues. In what sense this countercultural phenomenon will be measured societal impact is still an open question.

  • 14.
    Tobias, Harding
    et al.
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Nordvall, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Introduction to the thematic issue on Bildung and popular education2015In: Nordisk kulturpolitisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-3216, E-ISSN 2000-8325, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 158-160Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Turunen, Annika
    Åbo Akademi, Åbo, Finland.
    Att snickra medborgarskap?2015In: Nordisk kulturpolitisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-3216, E-ISSN 2000-8325, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 219-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to study how the social interactions exhibited at a woodworking course for seniors within institutionalized popular education in Finland («kansalaisopisto» in Finnish, «medborgarinstitut» in Swedish) contribute to the participants' conceptualization of their citizenship. Popular education is considered to contribute to a functioning democracy through its collective and participant-centered activities and content. The aim of the article is to shed some light on how this ideal is realized and contribute knowledge about how participation in institutionalized popular education can be understood as an expression of citizenship. The study was conducted as an ethnographic field study with the researcher as a participant in the course. The course was held three times a week for 15 weeks. The participants consisted of 12 men and a woman between the ages of 60 and 80. The researcher aspired to become a part of the group in order to clarify what goes on in the course through thick descriptions relying on neither going native nor mimicking them. The seniors organize their woodworking in the course as a work community. Within this community, it is possible to act as a citizen in relation to shared basic values. These values are an aspiration to live up to ideals of conscientiousness and diligence in order to remain ready to act as a productive citizen.

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