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  • 1.
    Antoni, Marc
    et al.
    Robert Bosch GmbH.
    Nilsson-Witell, Lars
    Service Research Center Karlstads universitet.
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Quality Technology and Management.
    Inter-project improvement in product development2005In: International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, ISSN 0265-671X, E-ISSN 1758-6682, Vol. 22, no 9, p. 876-893Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Elg, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management .
    Olsson, J.
    Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management .
    Implementing statistical process control: An organizational perspective2008In: International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, ISSN 0265-671X, E-ISSN 1758-6682, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 545-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of how statistical process control (SPC) methodology can be implemented and used in organizational settings. Design/methodology/approach - An action research model was used. Data were collected through formal meeting protocols, interviews and participant observation. Findings - Based on the results of an action research project, the paper emphasizes the need for: top management support with respect to roles such as infrastructural assistance, mentor, critic, financer, creating system validity through the involvement of people with experiential knowledge about the "world" in which SPC should be applied, keeping a small, highly knowledgeable development team with appropriate expertise together during the whole process from beginning to end, keeping the various end-users in focus but separate and prioritising between their different needs, and working with iterative design methodology. Research limitations/implications - The paper provides the research field with a unique case of implementing SPC using a computerized administrative data system. Practical implications - Organizations are given guidelines to use when implementing SPC. Originality/value - The paper contributes knowledge in an underdeveloped field of research. It may provide a basis for further research and scholarly analysis. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 3.
    Fundin, A.
    et al.
    Fundin, A..
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management .
    Exploring routes of dissatisfaction feedback: A multiple case study within a machine industry segment2006In: International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, ISSN 0265-671X, E-ISSN 1758-6682, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 986-1001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore routes of dissatisfaction feedback transferrals within a Swedish machine industry segment. The study focuses upon transferrals from dissatisfied users to the product development organizations. There is also an interest in determining whether the feedback is reliable and, if not, how to improve the reliability of this information to create a better basis for decision-making. Design/methodology/approach - The paper presents the results from a qualitative interview-based study of 16 product development organizations and their customer dissatisfaction feedback systems. About 84 percent of the companies within a machine industry segment in Sweden are covered. Based on the empirical investigation, a typology describes four different dissatisfaction feedback constructs, depending on whether the feedback system is active or passive, and on whether the feedback is codified or personalized. Findings - The study indicates that parallel usage of codified and personalized dissatisfaction feedback, compared to using these transferrals in isolation only, improves reliability of dissatisfaction information and puts product developers in a better position when deciding on future actions. However, a real challenge is how to turn passive dissatisfaction routes into active ones. Managing passive dissatisfaction routes with service personnel and call centres as knowledge carriers more actively in product development can certainly reveal many of the hidden needs of users. Originality/value - Our project is essentially managerial, aiming to provide managers and other decision-makers with a framework to establish reliable and adequate customer feedback systems for more effective product development. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 4.
    Fundin, Anders
    et al.
    Volvo Construction Equipment, Eskilstuna.
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Continuous learning using dissatisfaction feedback in new product development contexts2010In: International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, ISSN 0265-671X, E-ISSN 1758-6682, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 860-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore how various dissatisfaction feedback transferrals contribute to the decision-making process in product development contexts.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper presents the results from a qualitative interview-based study of 16 product development organizations and their customer dissatisfaction feedback systems; 84 percent of the companies within a machine industry segment in Sweden are covered.

    Findings – Based on the empirical investigation, a taxonomy of five decisions based upon dissatisfaction feedback is developed: reactive, preventive and developmental decisions are connected with exploitation of products, while future developmental and future preventive decisions are connected with exploration of future products.

    Originality/value – The project is essentially managerial, aiming to provide managers and other decision makers with a framework that displays how various dissatisfaction feedback transferrals contribute to various decisions in product development contexts. The paper highlights that despite costly investigations in customer feedback systems, very few customer dissatisfaction feedback transferrals are connected to explorative future developmental actions.

     

  • 5.
    Nilsson-Witell, Lars
    et al.
    Service Research Center Karlstad university.
    Antoni, Marc
    Roberg Bosch GmbH.
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Quality Technology and Management.
    Continuous improvement in product development: Improvement programs and quality principles2005In: International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, ISSN 0265-671X, E-ISSN 1758-6682, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 753-768Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Continuous improvement has become an important strategy in improving organizational performance. Unfortunately, product development is often excluded in continuous improvement programs due to the special characteristics of product development activities. The overall purpose of this paper is to contribute to a better understanding of continuous improvement in the context of product development. Design/methodology/approach - A central aspect in this context is that many organizations find it difficult to improve and learn if work is carried out in the form of projects. In this paper, a quality perspective on continuous improvement is introduced and its usefulness is tested empirically through three case studies in Swedish organizations. The focus is on the improvement programs used and the quality principles displayed in a product development context. Findings - The results show that the three investigated organizations have multiple improvement programs, but that some configurations of improvement programs seem to be more successful than others. For instance, co-ordination of multiple improvement programs, scope creep, and separating between product development processes and project management models are important success factors for continuous improvement. In addition, an introduction of an improvement program without adoption of a critical mass of quality principles is doomed to fail. Originality/value - The research initiative is one of the first to conduct an empirical investigation of how organizations design and work with improvement programs in the context of product development. It provides knowledge to both academics and practitioners on how organizations can design and implement initiatives on quality management, especially in the context of product development. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 6.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Quality Technology and Management.
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Quality Technology and Management.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Ergonomics.
    Implementing ISO 14000 in Sweden: Motives, Benefits and Comparisons with ISO 9002004In: International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, ISSN 0265-671X, E-ISSN 1758-6682, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 585-606Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

         

  • 7.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Quality Technology and Management.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Ergonomics.
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Quality Technology and Management.
    ISO 9001: 2000 in small organisations2006In: International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, ISSN 0265-671X, E-ISSN 1758-6682, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 490-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The aim of the study is to investigate and to understand the practice of implementing and operating the QMS in an organisational context, providing an analysis of the way ISO 9001:2000 was implemented and operated and focusing on identifying factors which have negatively or positively influenced the effects of the quality management system (QMS). Design/methodology/approach - Three case studies of small organisations were examined. The methodological approach was based on Porras and Robertson's model. The data collection methods included interviews, a questionnaire survey of all employees and document studies. Findings - ISO 9001:2000 was implemented and operated with minimum effort and little change was experienced. QMS was not perceived as a tool for managing processes, but as a tool for handling documentation. Consequently, this was reflected in the benefits achieved. Despite the external benefits which followed from obtaining the certificates, only minor internal benefits were found. Internal motivation, engaged and trained employees, a competent quality manager, committed CEO and development-oriented auditors were identified as critical, influencing the effects from ISO 9000. In general, in the way ISO 9001:2000 was implemented and operated many opportunities for improvement were lost. Research limitations/implications - The choice of small organisations for the case studies has important implications for the results. Small organisations often lack resources, which limits the initiatives that they can take. Practical implications - The QMS and its effects are not determined by the ISO 9001 requirements, but by the organisational context and the way the system is implemented and operated. Originality/value - The paper provides an explanation why organisations achieve very different results from ISO 9001 implementation. It also shows that certification bodies may have an important role for the effectiveness of the QMS. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 8.
    Setijono, D.
    et al.
    Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The value of quality improvements2008In: International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, ISSN 0265-671X, E-ISSN 1758-6682, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 292-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of the paper is to present a proactive quality costs measurement methodology, which describes the value of quality improvements and the implication of this value on customers' perception regarding the value of the product. Design/methodology/approach - By describing the perceived customer value in a dynamic term, it becomes possible to derive an analytical model that recognizes the implication of a company's efforts to improve design quality and conformance quality on product value as perceived by the customers. Quality costs as a performance indicator of improved design quality and conformance quality (as the results of prevention and appraisal activities) can be expressed in terms of value (i.e. a trade-off between benefits and sacrifices), where the benefits of the improvement include higher product quality and reduction of failure costs. The sacrifices include the costs to perform improvement activities (i.e. prevention and appraisal costs). Expressing quality costs in this way thus establishes a link between a producer's efforts to improve quality and the way customers perceive the value of the product. The developed methodology of proactive quality cost measurement has been applied for collecting, measuring, and reporting quality costs in a Swedish wood-flooring manufacturing company. Findings - Transforming quality cost measurements into value provides a better explanation regarding the effect of prevention and appraisal activities on the quality improvement indicators. Thus, the value of quality improvements is a measure of return on quality improvements (ROQI), which indicates whether the quality improvement efforts gave higher, fair, or lower return. Originality/value - This paper develops and discusses a model of customer value by accommodating its relative nature, and presents a proactive way of measuring quality costs (i.e. value-oriented and customer-oriented). © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 9.
    Wreder, Åsa
    et al.
    Quality and Environmental Management Luleå University of Technology.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings.
    Klefsjö, Bengt
    Quality and Environmental Management Luleå University of Technology.
    Management for sustainable health: A TQM-inspired model based on experiences taken from successful Swedish organizations2008In: International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, ISSN 0265-671X, E-ISSN 1758-6682, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 561-584Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is threefold: to describe how a large organization has successfully worked to achieve sustainable health, compare the work of the large organization with methodologies used by smaller successful organizations, and then to create a model for how managers of larger organizations can work to create sustainable health. Design/methodology/approach - The empirical data were gathered through interviews with managers at different organizational levels and workshops with employees, within a case study in a large bank which received the award "Sweden's best workplace". The data were also compared to results from earlier case studies of three smaller organizations that have received the same award. Findings - The results of the studies show coinciding results as to the importance of management commitment and methodologies, such as employee involvement, delegation, goal deployment and coaching, to create a health-promoting work environment. This indicates that larger organizations do not need any specific methodologies. Practical implications - Based on the experiences from four successful organizations, managers should mainly consider doing the following: start measuring and evaluating the consequences of sickness absence in their organization, and adopt a management strategy based on humanistic core values that are supported by methodologies and tools. Originality/value - The paper adds understanding about how managers of large organizations could work practically to overcome management problems in today's working life and support the work and organizational factors earlier described in the literature to create a health-promoting work environment that stimulates the development of sustainable health. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

1 - 9 of 9
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