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  • 1.
    Arsenovic, Jasenko
    et al.
    Karlstad University, CTF, Service Research Center, Sweden.
    De Keyser, Arne
    EDHEC Business School, Department of Marketing, France.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, CTF, Service Research Center, Sweden; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, CTF, Service Research Center, Sweden; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Gruber, Thorsten
    Loughborough University, Centre for Service Management (CSM), United Kingdom.
    Justice (is not the same) for all: The role of relationship activity for post-recovery outcomes2021In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 134, p. 342-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the widespread adoption of the justice framework in service recovery literature, research findings vary as to what dimension - distributive, interactional, procedural - is most important. This paper contributes to this debate by considering how an easily accessible variable like relationship activity (i.e., the frequency of visiting and purchasing from a company) moderates the impact of the justice dimensions on post-recovery customer outcomes. Findings show that distributive justice is the only dimension impacting word-of-mouth (WOM) and repurchase behavior for low- and medium-relationship-activity customer segments. For a high-relationship- activity segment, all justice dimensions have a positive and balanced impact on WOM and/or repurchase behavior. This research demonstrates the potential of a segmented approach for recovery, while also providing managers with valuable insights into how they can use readily available information to adapt their service re- covery efforts.

  • 2.
    Benoit, Sabine
    et al.
    University of Surrey, Guildford, United Kingdom; Australian National University (ANU), Canberra, Australia.
    Kienzler, Mario
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Intuitive pricing by independent store managers: Challenging beliefs and practices2020In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 115, p. 70-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Independent store managers—who constitute a substantial portion of the retailing sector—often have limited resources with which to practice the formalized, data-driven pricing processes prescribed in the literature. On that basis, this article addresses how independent convenience store managers arrive at prices and whether their practices are effective. To begin with, 33 interviews with independent convenience store managers identified six common beliefs and ten practices underlying managers’ intuitive decision making. Based on point-of-sale survey data from 1,504 customers of two convenience store chains at petrol stations, a second study compared market-oriented managerial beliefs with actual customer price perceptions and buying behaviors. The combined insights from these studies reveal that managers base their pricing decisions on beliefs that are only partially accurate and suggests how managers might benefit by altering their price-setting practices.

  • 3.
    Ekman, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Västerås, Sweden.
    Röndell, Jimmie
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Västerås, Sweden.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Thompson, Steven
    University of Richmond, Robins School of Business, Richmond, USA.
    Raggio, Randle
    University of Richmond, Robins School of Business, Richmond, USA; Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Västerås, Sweden.
    Emergent market innovation: A longitudinal study of technology-driven capability development and institutional work2021In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 124, p. 469-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extant literature focuses primarily on deliberate, proactive market-shaping efforts to understand changes in markets. This paper explores how emergent, incremental activities might unintentionally prompt market innovation due to the interactions of capability development and its required institutional work. Using a critical case method, we study a firm that successfully challenged established market logic by systematically changing its capabilities. A longitudinal field study reveals that capability development demands induce changes to institutional foundations; then, as institutions change, further capabilities can be developed, all of which may instigate wider market innovation outcomes. This study conceptualizes this intricate, iterative process, as well as its evolutionary market innovation outcomes. The proposed three-level capability model can guide firms striving to offer new and innovative services. The authors also detail a three-stage research design methodology that can help research and practice gain in-depth understanding of both emergent unintentional market innovation and strategic deliberate market-shaping activities. 

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  • 4.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    et al.
    Eawag Swiss Federal Institute Aquat Science and Technology.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Karlstad University.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Competitive advantage through service differentiation by manufacturing companies2011In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 64, no 12, p. 1270-1280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the relationship among the complexity of customer needs, customer centricity, innovativeness, service differentiation, and business performance within the context of companies that have made a service transition from pure goods providers to service providers. A survey of 332 manufacturing companies provides the basis for the empirical investigation. One key finding is that a strong emphasis on service differentiation can lead to a manufacturing firms strategies for customer centricity being less sensitive to increasingly complex customer needs, which can increase a firms payoff for customer centricity. In contrast, the payoff from innovativeness appears to be higher if the firm focuses its resources on either product or service innovation; that is, a dual focus does not work well. This paper discusses the implications of these findings for researchers and managers.

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  • 5.
    Giannoccaro, Ilaria
    et al.
    Polytech Bari, Italy.
    Galesic, Mirta
    Santa Fe Inst, NM 87501 USA; Max Planck Inst Human Dev, Germany.
    Massari, Giovanni Francesco
    Polytech Bari, Italy.
    Barkoczi, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carbone, Giuseppe
    Polytech Bari, Italy.
    Search behavior of individuals working in teams: A behavioral study on complex landscapes2020In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 118, p. 507-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Search is a fundamental part of complex problem solving and often involves a choice between the exploration of new ideas and the exploitation of already known solutions. While literature has mainly analyzed search behavior of individuals working alone, we investigate search accomplished by individuals working in teams. We study the interplay of three theoretically grounded factors that can affect the search behavior of individuals in teams: the level of behavioral interdependence among team members, the members limited level of knowledge about the problem, and the performance feedback they receive. We operationalize search behavior in terms of search distance, which reflects the extent of exploration in problem space. Results show that high behavioral interdependence reduces exploration, while limited knowledge promotes exploration. Furthermore, positive performance feedback leads to reduced exploration, the more so the lower behavioral interdependence and the more limited knowledge are. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of these results for team design.

  • 6.
    Hinterhuber, Andreas
    et al.
    Ca Foscari Univ Venice, Italy.
    Kienzler, Mario
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liozu, Stephan
    Case Western Reserve Univ, OH 44106 USA.
    New product pricing in business markets: The role of psychological traits2021In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 133, p. 231-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How does the bounded rationality of managers affect pricing? We examine this under-researched question by examining how different psychological traits of managers relate to new product pricing practices and how these pricing practices, in turn, relate to new product performance. To do so, we survey 302 American marketing, sales, and pricing managers responsible for new product pricing decisions in business markets. Among others, our study identifies conformity and intuition as distinct psychological traits associated with pricing practices that have a positive relationship with new product performance. The main contribution of this study is the empirical demonstration that psychological traits offer valuable insights into how managers determine prices for new products in business markets.

  • 7.
    Holmlund, Maria
    et al.
    Hanken, Svenska handelshögskolan, Helsingfors, Finland.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Centre for Relationship Marketing and Service Management, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki,Helsinki, Finland.
    Biggemann, Sergio
    Marketing Department, School of Business, University of Otago, New Zealand.
    Organizational Behavior in Innovation, Marketing, and Purchasing in Business Service Contexts: An Agenda for Academic Inquiry2016In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 69, no 7, p. 2457-2462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many businesses today recognize the increased significance of service and the transition toward service orientation. Nonetheless, organizational practitioners frequently encounter problems managing this shift and seizing service-related business opportunities. This practical relevance, together with many still-unanswered service research questions, has inspired the preparation of this special section that advances the extant literatures on business services. We finish by providing a research agenda. First, more research is needed on the buyer perspective. Second, researchers need to keep in mind financial issues related to business services. Third, more researchers could tap into management, leadership, and decision-making in business service companies. Finally, sustainability, social responsibility, and environmental considerations are important topics for further exploration.

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  • 8.
    Johansson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Raddats, Chris
    Univ Liverpool, England.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    The role of customer knowledge development for incremental and radical service innovation in servitized manufacturers2019In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 98, p. 328-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service innovation is a key driver of service infusion for manufacturers. Although service innovation is widely researched for service firms, it is less explored for service infusion in manufacturers. Existing research about service infusion considers developing customer knowledge in sales and service delivery, but there is scarce research about how manufacturers develop customer knowledge during new service development (NSD). This study investigates customer knowledge development within manufacturers and considers how it differs between the development of incremental and radical service innovations. A study was undertaken with 239 European manufacturers which revealed multiple drivers of customer knowledge development, service innovation performance, and firm performance. Developing incremental service innovations are more successful when customers participate in NSD teams while developing radical service innovations leads manufacturers to higher firm performance.

  • 9.
    Karabag, Solmaz Filiz
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Factors impacting firm failure and technological development: A study of three emerging-economy firms2019In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 98, p. 462-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies examine the successful globalization and technological development of emerging-economy firms. However, few discuss why some other emerging-economy firms do not develop sufficient technological capabilities, and thus, fail in domestics and global markets. Consequently, the understanding of emerging-economy firm diversity is limited. By analyzing the failure of three firms in two major industries in Turkey, this study identifies a complex set of factors contributing to this outcome. These factors include political risk, macroeconomic regime, national technology policies, and industry dynamics, as well as firm-related factors such as ownership, strategic intent, and the approach to, and current stage of, technology capability development. The results indicate that some of these factors support firm success in the short term but discourage learning and technological capability building, and thus, cause firm failures in the long term. Thus, the study illustrates the importance of studying emerging-economy firms from an extended contextual and temporal perspective.

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  • 10.
    Karabag, Solmaz Filiz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Antecedents of firm performance in emerging economies: Business groups, strategy, industry structure, and state support2014In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 67, no 10, p. 2212-2223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A rich literature has investigated the antecedents of firm performance in developed economies, resulting in a consensus view that firm resources and strategy are the key determinants. Several arguments, however, suggest that in emerging economies other factors are more important for firm performance. This study analyzes the impact of firm strategy and industry structure as well as business group membership and state support on firm performance in an advanced emerging economy, Turkey. Using a data set compiled from a selection of the 1000 largest manufacturing firms in this country, the study employs several regression models to identify the main determinants of firm performance as measured by productivity and net profit margin. In contrast to studies of developed economies, the investigation finds that firm-related factors (competitive strategies) do not significantly influence performance; instead factors related to industry structure and business group membership are the strongest determinants of firm performance; further, state support interacts with business group membership and is positively related to productivity.

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  • 11.
    Kienzler, Mario
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Hanken School of Economics, Department of Marketing, CERS – Centre for Relationship Marketing and Service Management.
    Pricing strategy: A review of 22 years of marketing research2017In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 78, p. 101-110Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the development and current state of pricing strategy research by undertaking a content analysis of 515 articles published in leading academic journals between 1995 and 2016. The results suggest several developments in research focus and methodology; recent research has focused more strongly on services and applies more rigorous research designs. The results also indicate a persistent focus on consumer markets and economic theories, as well as an increasing consideration of demand-side respondents, at the expense of supply-side respondents. An important feature of this review is a set of actionable takeaways, with both theoretical and methodological implications for pricing strategy research.

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  • 12.
    Kienzler, Mario
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. CERS Ctr Relationship Mkt & Serv Management, Finland.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Purchasing professionals and the flat-rate bias: Effects of price premiums, past usage, and relational ties on price plan choice2021In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 132, p. 403-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purchasing professionals arguably choose a price plan that leads to the lowest costs-all else being equal-for their companies when buying services. However, evidence suggests that they prefer flat rates, even where these are more expensive than pay-per-use options. A series of four experiments showed that experienced purchasing professionals tend to exhibit a flat-rate bias in their price plan choices across different business services. The experiments also investigated moderators that intensify or attenuate this bias, which decreased when the flat-rate option was the more expensive alternative but increased with past usage, with upper bound extremes. We also found directional support that the flat-rate bias increases when the buyer-seller relationship is stronger. The experiments also revealed how insurance, convenience, taximeter, overestimation, distrust, and administration effects are related to preferences for flat rates. Beyond their contribution to the pricing literature, these results provide actionable insights for marketing managers and purchasing professionals.

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  • 13.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sandberg, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Enabling service innovation: A dynamic capabilities approach2013In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 66, no 8, p. 1063-1073Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The point of departure for this article is the need for product-centric firms to compete in the market by adding services to their portfolio, which requires a greater focus on service innovation if they are to remain competitive. A major challenge associated with the shift from product-centeredness to a product and-service orientation is the management of the essential dynamic capabilities of sensing, seizing, and reconfiguring needed for service innovation. The research study reported identifies key microfoundations forming the basis of successful realignment of a firm's dynamic capabilities so as to achieve a better fit with service innovation activities. Eight qualitative case studies of product-centric firms form the basis of the study. The findings make three primary contributions to the body of knowledge. First, they extend the existing literature on dynamic capabilities by specifically discussing microfoundations related to service innovation. Second, the study extends existing work on service innovation into the manufacturing industries by identifying the key microfoundations in that context. Third, the research provides empirical evidence of dynamic capabilities in practice, especially in product-centric settings in which the service context is novel.

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  • 14.
    Kohtamaki, Marko
    et al.
    Univ Vaasa, Finland; Univ South Eastern Norway, Norway.
    Parida, Vinit
    Univ Vaasa, Finland; Lulea Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Sodertorn Univ, Sweden.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Fraunhofer IMW, Germany; Univ St Gallen, Switzerland.
    Baines, Tim
    Aston Univ, England.
    Digital servitization business models in ecosystems: A theory of the firm2019In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 104, p. 380-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study extends the discussion of digital servitization business models by adopting the perspective of the theory of the firm. We use four theories of the firm (industrial organization, the resource-based view, organizational identity, and the transaction cost approach) to understand digital servitization business models of firms in the context of ecosystems. Digitalization transforms the business models of solution providers and shapes their firm boundary decisions as they develop digital solutions across organizational boundaries within ecosystems such as harbors, mines, and airports. Thus, digitalization not only affects individual firms business models but also requires the alignment of the business models of other firms within the ecosystem. Hence, business models in digital servitization should be viewed from an ecosystem perspective. Based on a rigorous literature review, we provide suggestions for future research on digital servitization business models within ecosystems.

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  • 15.
    Koskela-Huotari, Kaisa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Sweden; VIT Technical Research Centre Finland, Finland.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Jonas, Julia M.
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Sorhammar, David
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Innovation in service ecosystems-Breaking, making, and maintaining institutionalized rules of resource integration2016In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 69, no 8, p. 2964-2971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on service-dominant logic and institutional theory, this paper examines innovation as a process that unfolds through changes in the institutional arrangements that govern resource integration practices in service ecosystems. Four cases are used to illustrate the interdependent patterns of breaking, making and maintaining the institutionalized rules of resource integration occurring on multiple levels of institutional context. Such institutional work allows actors to cocreate value in novel and useful ways by a) including new actors, b) redefining roles of involved actors and c) reframing resources within service ecosystems. Our findings show that while the efforts of breaking and making the institutionalized rules are required for such changes to occur, at the same time, institutional maintenance is also important for these changes to institutionalize, that is, to become an integral part of the institutional structure coordinating value cocreation. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 16.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Alejandro, Thomas Brashear
    University of Massachusetts Amherst.
    Brege, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Biggemann, Sergio
    University of Otago.
    Service infusion as agile incrementalism in action2012In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 65, no 6, p. 765-772Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As product markets mature, firms are increasingly offering industrial services, in order to differentiate themselves and remain competitive. The general strategic view emerging from the services literature is that service infusion in manufacturing industries takes a somewhat unidirectional path from products to service provision. Based on in-depth case study research in the materials handling industry and drawing on Lindblom's (1979) concept of disjointed incrementalism, this study shows how service infusion often takes place in small steps without clearly directed efforts. The study identifies elements of incrementalism central to service infusion and demonstrates how a successful service strategy involves continuous modifications, adaptability, the seizing of ad hoc innovation, a continuous recalibration of opportunities, and the management of intertwining goals. The study introduces the concept of agile incrementalism; this concept aptly describes this contingency approach. The article contributes to a multifaceted and nuanced picture ofservice strategy and the service-infusion process.

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  • 17.
    Lind, Christine Holmström
    et al.
    Department of Business Studies, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kang, Olivia
    Department of Business and Economic Studies, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Ljung, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rosenbaum, Paul
    Department of Business Studies, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Involvement of multinational corporations in social innovation: Exploring an emerging phenomenon2022In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 151, p. 207-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While studies on social innovation (SI) have expanded significantly, our understanding of multinational cor-porations (MNCs) in the "social" innovation arena remains in its infancy. Through a systematic literature review, we consolidate and examine literature linking the MNC with the ongoing discussion of SI based activities. Based on a qualitative content analysis of 60 articles, this review explores how the MNC is portrayed with regard to its involvement in SI. The analysis identifies a fragmented view of MNCs involvement in SI and reveals a variety of theoretical approaches and conceptualisations in prior research. Our review presents a framework of MNC involvement in SI encompassing: differentiated conceptualisations, a dual value approach, five generic MNC roles, proactive and/or responsive motives, and specific barriers connected to the involvement in SI activities. From this, we suggest a number of implications for theory and practice as well as some directions for future research.

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  • 18.
    Lundin, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Digitalizing customer journeys in B2B markets2023In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 157, article id 113639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the digitalization of business-to-business (B2B) customer journeys, which is recognized as a top research priority, but one that has not yet received substantial academic attention. Due to their complexity, customer journeys are particularly relevant in B2B settings, and this is further emphasized through the increasing use of digital technologies. This paper identifies three key dimensions of B2B customer journeys that are influenced by digitalization. These are the digitalization of touchpoints (i.e., adding digital touchpoints and transforming or facilitating touchpoints), the change of roles in digitalized journeys (i.e., introducing new roles, activating customers, and emphasizing collectivity), and the digitalization of the overall process (i.e., extending, enhancing, and supporting the process). The research is based on an in-depth case study of a B2B firm and four customers. Insights from the research add to the customer journey literature through the exploration of digita-lized B2B customer journeys, providing guidance for academics and practitioners.

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  • 19.
    McColl-Kennedy, Janet R.
    et al.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Hogan, Suellen J.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Snyder, Hannah
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Cocreative customer practices: Effects of health care customer value cocreation practices on well-being2017In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 70, p. 55-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on three studies using data from six separate samples of 1151 health care customers, the authors investigate cocreative customer practices, modeling the effects of customer value cocreation practices on well-being. Results highlight that while positive interactions with medical staff (doctors) lead to increased well-being through engaging in coproducing treatment options, interactions with friends and family and their associated cocreated activities have an even greater positive effect on well-being. Furthermore, several other customer directed activities have positive indirect effects. Interestingly, activities requiring change can have a negative effect on well-being, except in psychological illnesses, where the opposite is true. The authors conclude with theoretical and managerial implications, highlighting that if interactions and activities with medical professionals are supplemented with customer-directed activities, the positive effect on well-being is significantly enhanced. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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  • 20.
    Raja, Jawwad
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Frandsen, Thomas
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Jarmatz, Martin
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Learning to discover value: Value-based pricing and selling capabilities for services and solutions2020In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 114, p. 142-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many manufacturers invest in advanced services and solutions to achieve superior customer value; however, research has only begun to examine capabilities for value-based pricing (VBP) and value-based selling (VBS) in relation to such offerings. This article explores (1) which capabilities firms seek to develop for VBP and VBS of industrial services and solutions and (2) how learning influences the development of these capabilities. An in-depth exploratory study of two global market leaders in their respective industries includes interviews with 66 respondents from the firms, as well as 12 interviews with customer and supplier informants, which reveal important capabilities for VBP and VBS. Higher-level learning supports value discovery, through dialogue with customers over time; this value in turn forms the basis for VBP and VBS. Higher-level learning capabilities also facilitate the adaptation and replication of the developed pricing and selling capabilities in various contexts.

  • 21.
    Sklyar, Alexey
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Department of Marketing, CERS – Centre for Relationship Marketing and Service Management, Hanken School of Economics, Finland.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway; CTF – Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Sörhammar, David
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Organizing for digital servitization: A service ecosystem perspective2019In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 104, p. 450-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Harnessing digital technology is of increasing concern as product firms organize for service-led growth. Adopting a service ecosystem perspective, we analyze interfirm and intrafirm change processes taking place as firms pursue digital servitization. The study draws on in-depth interviews with 44 managers involved in organizing activities in two multinational industry leaders. Our findings identify major differences between the two focal firms in terms of digital service-led growth and associated ecosystem-related activities. The study disentangles underlying processes of organizational change in the ecosystem and suggests that within-firm centralization and integration play a key role in the capacity to organize for digital servitization. For managers, the findings highlight the need to foster service-centricity in order to take full advantage of digitalization beyond purely technological benefits.

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  • 22.
    Snyder, Hannah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. CTF, Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    CTF, Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Sweden / Norwegian Business School, Norway.
    Fombelle, Paul
    D'Amore-McKim School of Business, Northeastern University, USA.
    Kristensson, Per
    CTF, Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Identifying categories of service innovation: A review and synthesis of the literature2016In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 69, no 7, p. 2401-2408Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Service innovation acts as society’s engine of renewal and provides the necessary catalyst for the service sector’s economic growth. Despite service innovation’s importance, the concept remains fuzzy and poorly defined. Building on an extensive and systematic review of 1046 academic articles, this research investigates and explores how service innovation is defined and used in research. Results identify four unique service innovation categorizations emphasizing the following traits: (1) degree of change, (2) type of change, (3) newness, and (4) means of provision. The results show that most research focuses inward and views service innovation as something (only) new to the firm. Interestingly, service innovation categorizations appear to neglect both customer value and financial performance.

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  • 23.
    Snyder, Hannah
    et al.
    BI Norwegian Business Sch, Norway.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    BI Norwegian Business Sch, Norway.
    McColl-Kennedy, Janet R.
    Univ Queensland, Australia.
    Consumer lying behavior in service encounters2022In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 141, p. 755-769Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whether they know it or not, firms interact with lying consumers on a daily basis. However, surprisingly little is known about consumer lying behavior and its role in service encounters. Based on two empirical studies of 2,976 consumer lies, the study sought to explore consumer lying behavior by developing and testing a comprehensive conceptual framework encompassing motives for lying, characteristics of the lie, and outcomes for consumers. Study 1 explores and details the components of the conceptual framework, and Study 2 further investigates and tests the relationships between the components of consumer lying behavior and the emotional, behavioral, and financial outcomes for consumers. The findings suggest new policies and how frontline employees might be trained and educated to address consumer lying behavior. The paper concludes by outlining an agenda for future research on lying behavior in service encounters.

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  • 24.
    Vakulenko, Yulia
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Arsenovic, Jasenko
    SDA Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
    Hellström, Daniel
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Shams, Poja
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Does delivery service differentiation matter?: Comparing rural to urban e-consumer satisfaction and retention2022In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 142, p. 476-484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of continuously growing e-commerce and the rising global count of e-consumers, e-retailers and logistics service providers need to differentiate and tailor their offerings to refine their operations and meet e- consumers’ needs. This study investigates how e-consumers’ residential-area type affects the satisfaction with delivery services and reuse intentions in relation to e-consumers’ ability to choose between delivery options. The aim was to explore and compare rural e-consumers to urban ones and conclude whether the service fitting can be performed without satisfaction loss. The results showed that for e-consumers from rural residential areas, the availability of different delivery options did not translate into greater satisfaction with the delivery service and reuse intention, while for urban residents, service diversity was linked to greater satisfaction.

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  • 25.
    Witell, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    EAWAG, Switzerland.
    Jaakkola, Elina
    Turku School of Economics, University of Turku, Finland.
    Hammedi, Wafa
    University of Namur, Belgium.
    Patricio, Lia
    Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Portugal.
    Perks, Helen
    University of Nottingham, UK.
    A bricolage perspective on service innovation2017In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 79, p. 290-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service innovation is often viewed as a process of accessing the necessary resources, (re)combining them, and converting them into new services. The current knowledge on success factors for service innovation, such as formalized new service development (NSD) processes, predominantly comes from studying large firms with a relatively stable resource base. However, this neglect situations in which organizations face severe resource constraints. This paper argues that under such constraints, a formalized new service development process could be counter-productive and a bricolage perspective might better explain service innovation in resource-constrained environments. In this conceptual paper, we propose that four critical bricolage capabilities (addressing resource scarcity actively, making do with what is available, improvising when recombining resources, and networking with external partners) influence service innovation outcomes. Empirical illustrations from five organizations substantiate our conceptual development. Our discussion leads to a framework and four testable propositions that can guide further service research.

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  • 26.
    Witell, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. CERS—Centre for Relationship Marketing and Service Management, Helsinki, Finland.
    Perks, Helen
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
    Raddats, Chris
    University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Schwabe, Maria
    Friedrich-Schiller-University of Jena, Jena, Germany.
    Benedettini, Ornella
    Polytechnic University of Bari, Bari, Italy.
    Burton, Jamie
    University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Characterizing customer experience management in business markets2020In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 416, p. 420-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Managing the customer experience has become a top priority for marketing managers and researchers. Research on customer experience management (CEM) has traditionally adopted a customer's viewpoint. Few studies have explicitly embraced an organizational perspective, and existing research focuses mainly on business-to-consumer settings. The present study espouses the utility of CEM in business-to-business (B2B) settings on the grounds that interactions in B2B contexts are also “experienced”. It explains how B2B firms can design and manage the customer experience to influence the customer at different touchpoints. The paper develops a comprehensive framework that characterizes CEM in B2B. The paper articulates key challenges for B2B CEM; relationship expectations (mismatches in customer relationships, siloed customer experiences); actor interaction issues (mismatches across the customer's journey, lack of touchpoint control); and temporal challenges (dynamics of the customer experience). The paper draws out the theoretical implications and develops managerial implications for B2B firms.

  • 27.
    Witell, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. CTF, Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Snyder, Hannah
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    CTF, Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Sweden/BI-Norwegian School of Management, Norway.
    Fombelle, Paul
    College of Business Administration, Northeastern University, United States.
    Kristensson, Per
    CTF, Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Defining service innovation: A review and syntesis2016In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 69, no 8, p. 2863-2872Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on service innovation appears in several research disciplines, with important contributions in marketing, management, and operations research. Although the concept is widely used, few research papers have explicitly defined service innovation. This dearth of research is the motivation for the present study. Through a systematic review of 1301 articles on service innovation appearing in academic journals between 1979 and 2014, this article examines research defining service innovation. The study identifies the key characteristics within 84 definitions of service innovation in different perspectives (assimilation, demarcation and synthesis) and shows how the meaning of the concept is changing. The review suggests that the large variety in definitions limits and hinders knowledge development of service innovation.

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  • 28.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Holtström, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Are mergers and acquisitions contagious?2006In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 59, no 12, p. 1267-1275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In traditional literature on mergers and acquisitions (M&As), the reasons to merge or acquire are largely described as strategies of the merging or acquiring parties. This article suggests that M&As are contextually driven. Based on six case studies, the article pinpoints how M&As among customers lead to M&As among suppliers, and vice versa. The article launches the concept of parallel M&As to describe this phenomenon, and asks the following question: in what ways are M&As among customers and suppliers a driving force for M&As by the other party? Matching, dependence and keeping a power balance are found as key explanations for parallel M&As. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 29.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Lunds Tekniska Högskola.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björklund, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Applying a network level in environmental impact assessments2012In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 247-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers and society devote increasing interest to environmental impact assessments. The study here discusses and questions current assessment models by relating them to inter-organizational network analyses, and demonstrates that single entities as the basis for environmental impact assessments may not be in the best interests of society. Three case studies focusing on logistical solutions illustrate environmental effects on a single-entity and a network level. The paper concludes that considering environmental impacts on a single-entity level disregards indirect effects, which in turn has consequences for the environment. The paper points to the importance of identifying the appropriate level for analysis of environmental impacts since the single entity as the basis for assessments may undermine environmentally friendly intentions.

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