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  • 1.
    Elg, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gremyr, Ida
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Halldórsson, Árni
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Wallo, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Service action research: Review and guidelines2020In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Conducting research that is both practice- and theory-relevant is important for the service research community. Action research can be a fruitful approach for service researchers studying the transformative role of service research and wanting to make contributions to both the research community and to practical development. By exploring the current use of action research in service research, this study aims to make suggestions for enhancing the contribution to theory and practice development and to propose criteria for research quality for action research in service research.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This study builds on a systematic literature review of the use of action research approaches in service research.

    Findings

    The study makes three main contributions. First, it posits that any action research project needs to consider the four elements of problem identification, theorization, creating guiding concepts and intervention. Second, based on these elements mirrored in service action research, it outlines and analyzes three approaches to action research (i.e. theory-enhancing, concept developing and practice-enhancing). Third, it suggests a move from instrumental to a more conceptual relevance of the research and elaborates on the criteria for research quality.

    Originality/value

    This study contributes to the understanding of how action research may be applied for conducting high-quality collaborative research in services and proposes measures to enhance research quality in action research projects focusing services.

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  • 2.
    Engström, Jon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    A self-determination theory perspective on customer participation in service development2015In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 29, no 6/7, p. 511-521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to explore what motivates patients to participate in service development and how participation may influence their well-being. Health-care providers are increasingly adopting practices of customer participation in such activities to improve their services.Design/methodology/approach– This paper builds on an analysis of data from a service development project in which lung cancer patients contributed by sharing their ideas and experiences through diaries. Out of the 86 lung cancer patients who were invited to participate, 20 agreed to participate and 14 fully completed the task. The study builds on participants’ contributions, in-depth interviews with six participants and the reasons patients gave for not participating.Findings– This paper identifies a number of motives: non-interest in participating, restitution after poor treatment, desire for contact with others, volunteerism, desire to make a contribution and the enjoyment of having a task to complete. A self-determination theory perspective was adopted to show how the need to satisfy basic human needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness determines if and how patients participate. Participation may have important benefits for patients, especially an improved sense of relatedness.Practical implications– Service providers must be prepared to meet different patient needs in service development, ranging from the need to express strong distress to expressing creativity. By understanding the dynamics of motivation and well-being, organizers may achieve better results in terms of improved services and in patient well-being.Originality/value– This study makes a significant contribution to the study of customer participation in service development, especially in relation to health care, by offering a self-determination-based typology for describing different styles of patient participation.

  • 3.
    Gremyr, Ida
    et al.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Valtakoski, Aku
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Two routes of service modularization: advancing standardization and customization2019In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 73-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    This study aims to investigate service modularization in a manufacturing firm, identifies service modularization processes and examines how these processes change the service module characteristics.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The study is based on a longitudinal case study (2008-2017) of a manufacturing firm. The development of six service modules was analyzed using data from interviews with key informants, informal meetings and internal documentation.

    Findings

    This study suggests five service modularization processes, and that service module characteristics, such as standardization and interconnectedness, change in different ways depending on the service modularization processes used. It further identifies two service modularization routes that each combine the service modularization processes in unique ways with replication as a key process to improve both standardization and customization.

    Practical implications

    This study elaborates a framework for service modularization, which can serve as a guideline for developing service modules. It also highlights the differences between product and service modularization, suggesting that the role of service module characteristics such as standardization and customization is specific for services.

    Originality/value

    This longitudinal case study (2008-2017) provides empirical evidence on service modularization and extends existing knowledge on service modularization processes and how they influence service module characteristics.

  • 4.
    Gummerus, Johanna
    et al.
    Department of Marketing, CERS – Centre for Relationship Marketing and Service Management, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    von Koskull, Catharina
    Department of Marketing, University of Vaasa, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Relationship marketing: Past, present, and future2017In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In a time when relationships have become recognized as an integral part of contemporary marketing theory and practice, what role can the sub-discipline of relationship marketing play? The aim with this special issue is to critically assess the state of relationship marketing and call for new ideas to take the field forward.

    Design/methodology/approach: We had an open call for papers with an original perspective and advanced thinking on relationship marketing, resulting in 50 originally submitted manuscripts that were subjected to double-blind review. Of these, this issue presents five articles. In addition, we invited well-renowned thought leaders who have contributed to theory development within relationship marketing. This issue starts with their four thoughtful, forward-orientated contributions.

    Findings: Several thought-provoking reflections and research findings are presented that urge relationship marketing researchers to explore novel avenues for the future of this area. A prominent way forward may be looking for a common ground in relationship marketing thinking, assessing the extent to which the different literature streams add to marketing research and when they do not, and testing/deploying the learnings in new settings.

    Research limitations/implications: This special issue does not address all areas of relationship marketing research. Potential areas for future relationship marketing research are identified.

    Originality/value: To assess existent knowledge of relationship marketing is needed to take the field forward.

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  • 5.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Aksoy, Lerzan
    Fordham University, NY 10023 USA.
    Brady, Michael K.
    Florida State University, FL 32306 USA.
    McColl-Kennedy, Janet R.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Sirianni, Nancy J.
    Northeastern University, MA 02115 USA.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Wuenderlich, Nancy V.
    University of Paderborn, Germany.
    Conducting service research that matters2015In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 29, no 6-7, p. 425-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to encourage the reader to think differently about service-related issues and to strive to conduct service research that makes a transformational impact on individuals, organizations and society. The authors suggest that service researchers are in an excellent position to develop research that matters by making stronger connections with theory and elevating purely applied research to research that is higher in both practical relevance and methodological rigor. Design/methodology/approach - This paper takes a conceptual approach, connecting pertinent literature with new ideas highlighted in this special issue. Findings - This paper proposes that service researchers look beyond traditional service applications, take a multi-disciplinary approach to problem-solving and make greater strides towards connecting theory and practice. The authors propose a Model of Rigorous and Relevant Research, and call for fresh thinking across a wide range of research areas, including enhancing the customer experience, crafting innovation, integrating technology and measuring service outcomes. Originality/value - The originality of this essay lies in its focus on revitalizing the discussion on relevance and rigor as a path forward for service research. Additionally, this paper offers new insights on core management aspects of service provision that provide a solid platform for future work in service research.

  • 6.
    Guyader, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    No One Rides for Free!: Three Styles of Collaborative Consumption2018In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 692-714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper focuses on collaborative consumption; that is, the peer-to-peer (P2P)exchange of goods and services facilitated by online platforms. Anchored in the access paradigm,collaborative consumption (e.g., accommodation rental, ridesharing services) differs fromcommercial services offered by firms (e.g., B2C carsharing). The aim of this study is to examine thenuanced styles of collaborative consumption in relation to market-mediated access practices andsocially mediated sharing practices.Design/methodology/approach – Following the general research trend on mobility services, thecontext of long-distance ridesharing is chosen. Data collection was conducted using participantobservation as peer service provider, 11 ethnographic interviews of consumers, and a netnographicstudy of digital artefacts.Findings – Using practice theory, 10 ridesharing activities were identified. These activities and thenuances in the procedures, understandings, and engagements in the ridesharing practice led to thedistinction of three styles of collaborative consumption: (1) Communal collaborative consumption,which is when participants seek pro-social relationships in belonging to a community; (2)Consumerist collaborative consumption, performed by participants who seek status andconvenience in the access lifestyle; and (3) Opportunistic collaborative consumption, whenparticipants seek to achieve monetary gain or personal benefits from abusive activities.Originality/value – By taking a phenomenological approach on collaborative consumption, thisstudy adds to the understanding of the sharing economy as embedded in both autilitarian/commercial economic system, and a non-market/communal social system. The threestyles of collaborative consumption propose a framework for future studies differentiating P2Pexchanges from other practices (i.e., B2C access-based services, sharing).

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  • 7.
    Holmlund, Maria
    et al.
    Hanken Sch Econ, Finland.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Norwegian Business Sch, Norway.
    Viewpoint: getting your qualitative service research published2020In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide authors with guidelines for carrying out excellent qualitative service research. It describes the features that editors and reviewers use to evaluate qualitative research and pinpoints what authors can do to improve their manuscripts for publication. Design/methodology/approach: The paper identifies five features of excellent qualitative service research - relevance, rigor, integrity, narration and impact - and describes them with a focus on what they mean and what authors can do to meet these standards. Findings: The paper suggests that manuscripts are often rejected because they fail to meet key standards of excellent qualitative research. It calls for more discussion on research methodology and research ethics, especially when service research strives to make a difference such as investigating critical service contexts or dealing with vulnerable participants. Originality/value: This paper contributes to a better use and application of qualitative research methodology. It focuses on specific actions that researchers can take to improve the quality of their service research manuscripts.

  • 8.
    Myhren, Per
    et al.
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karlstad Univ, Sweden; Eawag, Switzerland.
    Incremental and radical open service innovation2018In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 101-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Open service innovation is an emergent new service development practice, where knowledge on how to organize development work is scarce. The purpose of the present research is to identify and describe relevant archetypes of open service innovation. The study views an archetype as an organizing template that includes the competence of participants, organizing co-creation among participants and ties between participants. In particular, the studys interest lies in how open service innovation archetypes are used for incremental and radical service innovation. Design/methodology/approach For the research, a nested case study was performed, in which an industrial firm with nine open service innovation groups was identified. Forty-five interviews were conducted with participants. For each case, first a within-case analysis was performed, and how to perform open service innovation in practice was described. Then, a cross-case analysis identifying similarities and differences between the open service innovation groups was performed. On the basis of the cross-case analysis, three archetypes for open service innovation were identified. Findings The nested case study identified three archetypes for open service innovation: internal group development, satellite team development and rocket team development. This study shows that different archetypes are used for incremental and radical service innovation and that a firm can have multiple open service innovation groups using different archetypes. Practical implications This study provides suggestions on how firms can organize for open service innovation. The identified archetypes can guide managers to set up, develop or be part of open service innovation groups. Originality/value This paper uses open service innovation as a mid-range theory to extend existing research on new service development in networks or service ecosystems. In particular, it shows how open service innovation can be organized to develop both incremental and radical service innovations.

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  • 9.
    Valtakoski, Aku
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The evolution and impact of qualitative research in Journal of Services Marketing2020In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to review the evolution of empirical research methods in Journal of Services Marketing (JSM), how the choice of methodology is related to the research topic, and how methodology affects the impact of papers published in JSM. Design/methodology/approach Based on citation data from Scopus, bibliometric methods are used to describe the methodological evolution of literature over the period 1987-2017. Indicator correlations and logistic regression are used to test the methodological predispositions of research topics. Negative binomial regression is used to test the impact of paper methodology on paper citations on 1,036 papers. Findings Qualitative research methods have remained relatively rarely used in JSM (7.5 per cent qualitative papers, 13.4 per cent mixed methods), with no major changes over the past 15 years. The variety of research methods has slightly increased in the latest years. There are considerable differences in the methodological predispositions of research topics. The methodology does not directly affect the impact of papers. However, use of mixed methods may positively affect paper impact. Papers focusing on conceptual development tend to be cited more. Originality/value Provides an overview of the latest development in research methodologies used in JSM, and direct statistical evidence on how paper methodology and other characteristics influence paper impact. Identifies areas for further qualitative research.

  • 10.
    Witell, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Anderson, Laurel
    Arizona State University, AZ USA; .
    Brodie, Roderick J.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Colurcio, Maria
    Magna Graecia University of Catanzaro, Italy; University of Caxias do Sul, Brazil.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Kristensson, Per
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Lervik-Olsen, Line
    Norwegian Business Sch, Norway.
    Sebastiani, Roberta
    University of Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Italy.
    Wallin Andreassen, Tor
    NHH Norwegian School Econ, Norway.
    Exploring dualities of service innovation: implications for service research2015In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 29, no 6-7, p. 436-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this study is to explore three paradoxes of service innovation and provide a way forward for fresh thinking on the topic. Design/methodology/approach - Through a conceptual model of service innovation research, the authors challenge the "pro-change" bias and explore what can be learnt from the duality of service innovation. Findings - This paper suggests that research moves beyond a firm perspective to study service innovation on multiple levels of abstraction. A conceptual model based on two dimensions, level (individual, organization and society) and outcome (success, failure), is used to pinpoint and explore three dualities of service innovation: adopt-reject, change-static and good-bad. Originality/value - By challenging the traditional perspective on service innovation, the authors present new avenues for fresh thinking in research on service innovation. In this paper, the authors encourage researchers and managers to learn from failures and to acknowledge the negative effects of service innovation.

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  • 11.
    Witell, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Holmlund, Maria
    Hanken Sch Econ, Finland.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    BI Norwegian Business Sch, Norway.
    Editorial: a new dawn for qualitative service research2020In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to highlight the role of qualitative research in service research. This study discusses what qualitative research is, what role it has in service research and what interest, rigor, relevance and richness mean for qualitative service research. Design/methodology/approach This study examines the most common qualitative research methods and discusses interest, rigor, relevance and richness as key characteristics of qualitative research. The manuscripts in the special issue are introduced and categorized based on their contributions to service research. Findings The findings suggest that the amount of research using qualitative research methods has remained stable over the last 30 years. An increased focus on transparency and traceability is important for improving the perceived rigor of qualitative service research. Originality/value This special issue is the first issue that is explicitly devoted to the qualitative research methodology in service research. In particular, the issue seeks to contribute to a better use and application of qualitative research methodology.

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