liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 1 of 1
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Klinthäll, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    ‘Growth with equity’ and regional development: distributional consequences of agglomeration in Taiwan2015In: Journal of the Asia Pacific Economy, ISSN 1354-7860, E-ISSN 1469-9648, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 271-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates long-term distributional effects of regional agglomeration. We analyse changes in relative incomes for different educational and occupational categories in Taiwan from 1976 to 2006, a period during which the country underwent fundamental structural change from labour-intensive to knowledge-intensive industry and increasing globalisation of the economy. Long-term patterns derived from repeated estimations of cross-sectional micro-level data from 31 consecutive annual household surveys show that less-educated groups are not systematic losers of the transformation as positive externalities of agglomeration are both significant and widespread in the leading region. The famous pattern of ‘growth with equity’ in Taiwan has, however, become a regional rather than a national feature.

1 - 1 of 1
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf