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  • 1.
    Antony, Jiju
    et al.
    Heriot Watt University, Scotland.
    Setijono, Djoko
    University of Strathclyde, Scotland.
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lean Six Sigma and Innovation - an exploratory study among UK organisations2016In: Total quality management and business excellence (Online), ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 27, no 1-2, p. 124-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although research has been carried out linking Total Quality Management and Innovation, it was found that there is a dearth of literature exploring the relationship between Lean Six Sigma (LSS) and Innovation. The purpose of this paper is to explore the link between LSS and Process/Product/Service Innovation. A number of interviews were carried out with 10 UK-based companies to explore how LSS and Process/Product/Service Innovation are linked. The interviewees (Six Sigma Black Belts and Master Black Belts) were carefully chosen to ensure that sound and valid conclusions could be derived from the investigation. Due to constraints of limited time, the number of people who participated in the study was relatively small. However, the authors argue that this study can provide a good foundation to various researchers and practitioners to further explore the nature of the relationship between one of the most popular business process improvement methodologies (LSS) and Process/Product/Service Innovation. Based on the interviews of 10 companies in the UK engaging with LSS initiatives, the authors found that LSS is commonly viewed as fostering Process/Product/Service Innovation, Incremental Innovation, or Innovation Capability. The authors also identify seven features specific to LSS that are likely to have significant influence on the above types of Innovation.

  • 2.
    Dadfar, Hossein
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Afazeli, Siamack
    MBA ProMA Program.
    Brege, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Quality, export and domestic market performance: the case of pharmaceutical firms in Iran2015In: Total quality management and business excellence (Online), ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 26, no 9-10, p. 938-957Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the relationship between export involvement/performance and domestic market performance of pharmaceutical enterprises in Iran, an area which has remained largely unresearched. The study seeks to address the following three research objectives: first, to assess the export performance of Iranian pharmaceutical companies; second, to assess the performance of Iranian pharmaceutical companies in the domestic market; and third, to examine the relationship between export involvement/performance and domestic market performance. Although existing literature claims that local performance (rivalry) leads to export performance, this study reveals that in the Iranian pharmaceutical industry, export involvement and performance enhance local market performance. The study provides empirical evidence on the relationship between export performance and domestic market performance, and adds depth to the understanding of the reasons why the traditional views did not explain the situation. A comprehensive literature review was used to build our conceptual and analytical framework upon the Export Performance (EXPERF) model for export performance evaluation. The European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) Excellence Model and assessment indicators of Innovativeness, Learning and Lean indices were used for measuring domestic performance. By using clustering, six clusters of similar companies were identified and the centroids of the six clusters chosen to verify the relationship between export performance and domestic performance. Correlation analyses confirmed that there was a significant positive relation between export performance and domestic performance. This means that export performance results in better domestic performance, and vice versa.

  • 3.
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pugna, Adrian
    Politehn University of Timisoara, Romania.
    Potra, Sabina
    Politehn University of Timisoara, Romania.
    Negrea, Romeo
    Politehn University of Timisoara, Romania.
    Mocan, Marian
    Politehn University of Timisoara, Romania.
    A greenhouse approach for value cultivation2016In: Total quality management and business excellence (Online), ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 27, no 7-8, p. 836-852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper explores design requirements to take into consideration when designing and developing new products or services. The purpose of this article is to develop a strategic approach for analysing variations between potential customer needs in order better to understand what qualities should be further cultivated before product launch. This new approach is called A Greenhouse Approach for Value Cultivation. Case study data of a new web-based customisation service for a Romanian shoe manufacturing company has been re-analysed by using questionnaire data on 166 respondents perceptions on 14 attributes importance and value. A nonlinear regression model was developed and used to understand relations between importance and value. Such relations were used together with the Greenhouse Model to better understand the service attributes potential life cycles if selected for further cultivation. The Greenhouse Model envisages new perspectives of the evaluation of customer needs to support strategic decision-making regarding further value cultivation for profound affection (= customer delight). Even if there is a need for further tests the suggested Greenhouse Approach for Value Cultivation is regarded as a new and original contribution to the theory of attractive quality creation which deepens its position in the theory of attractive quality and transforms it into a practical management tool to support new product and service design.

  • 4.
    Dahlgaard-Park, Su Mi
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Editorial Material: Untitled in TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT and BUSINESS EXCELLENCE, vol 26, issue 9-10, pp 933-9372015In: Total quality management and business excellence (Online), ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 26, no 9-10, p. 933-937Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 5.
    Dahlgaard-Park, Su Mi
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Francesca Renzi, Maria
    University of Roma Tre, Italy.
    Editorial in TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT and BUSINESS EXCELLENCE2017In: Total quality management and business excellence (Online), ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 28, no 9-10, p. 931-933Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 6.
    Elg, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Wihlborg, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Örnerheim, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Public quality – for whom and how?: Integrating public core values with quality management2017In: Total quality management and business excellence (Online), ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 28, no 3-4, p. 379-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quality management (QM) plays an important role in public organisations’ efforts to create better access to, and effectiveness of, specific services. When transferring QM models from market-based firms to public services provided by public organisations, several basic contrasts and even contradictions must be addressed. Core values of the public sector differ from those of the private sector, but what are the consequences of this distinction? In this article we discuss the importance of four central arguments on public services: rights and access have to be considered; equality is an important facet of public services; coerciveness is a unique feature of public services; and legitimacy can be improved by high-quality services. These arguments have not been discussed explicitly in the context of QM. Adding these central aspects of public services to the QM field could generate more sustainable ways for developing quality and QM in public services in particular and the public sector in general.

  • 7.
    Gremyr, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Hellstrom, Andreas
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Martin, Jason
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The roles of quality departments and their influence on business resultsIn: Total quality management and business excellence (Online), ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the various roles of quality departments and investigates whether their roles have different influence on business results. Based on a survey of quality managers in 211 Swedish organisations, the analysis identifies four roles of quality departments: firefighters, auditors, process improvers, and orchestrators. The roles vary in their predominant adoption of Quality Management practices ranging from a narrow scope focusing on quality management systems to a broader scope, based on multiple practices. An analysis was performed to identify how each of the identified roles influences business results. The results show that quality departments with a broad focus, combining both explorative and exploitative quality practices, contribute the most to business results.

  • 8.
    Haber, Nicolas
    et al.
    Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, ‘Sapienza’ University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
    Fargnoli, Mario
    Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, ‘Sapienza’ University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Integrating QFD for Product-Service Systems with the Kano model and fuzzy AHP2018In: Total quality management and business excellence (Online), ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper proposes a systematic procedure for the development of Product-ServiceSystems (PSSs) by focusing on the analysis of customer requirements, and theselection of those that can practically enhance the offerings’ value. With this goal inmind, the Quality Function Deployment for Product Service Systems (QFDforPSS)method was augmented by means of the Kano model to filter the customers’ needsand transform the attractive ones into Receiver State Parameters (RSPs), as thecornerstone of QFDforPSS. Then, to properly assess these parameters and theirinherent uncertainty, the Fuzzy Analytical Hierarchy Process (FAHP) method wasalso integrated into the procedure. To validate the proposed procedure, it wasimplemented in a case study in the medical devices sector, in collaboration with ahaemodialysis equipment manufacturer, which operates in a regulated market ofproduct-oriented services.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-11-01 11:21
  • 9.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Drotz, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The rhetoric and reality of Lean: A multiple case study2016In: Total quality management and business excellence (Online), ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 27, no 3-4, p. 398-412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we analyse the similarities and differences between the descriptions of Lean found in the extant literature and how it is applied in practice. Using a multiple case study with seven cases from different sectors, we offer seven propositions about Lean as applied in reality and its relation to descriptions in literature. Our results indicate that organisations adopt the general rhetoric, and repeat the message conveyed by Lean proponents, in terms of the rationale for, and expected outcomes of, applying Lean. Furthermore, we see that the decision to implement Lean often precedes the identification of problems in the organisation, which causes a risk of an unfocused change process. Lean initiatives also tend to have a rather narrow scope, which contradicts the holistic view advocated in the literature. This, together with the variation in operationalisation, makes it difficult to predict the outcomes of a Lean initiative. Our study suggests that our findings do not depend on organisation size, sector or industry.

  • 10.
    Matjaz, Maletic
    et al.
    University of Maribor, Slovenia.
    Maletic, Damjan
    University of Maribor, Slovenia.
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlgaard-Park, Su Mi
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Gomiscek, Bostjan
    University of Maribor, Slovenia; University of Wollongong Dubai, U Arab Emirates.
    Effect of sustainability-oriented innovation practices on the overall organisational performance: an empirical examination2016In: Total quality management and business excellence (Online), ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 27, no 9-10, p. 1171-1190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One major means to address corporate sustainability practices in organisations are sustainability-oriented innovation practices, which tend to result in significantly improved products, services, processes or even management systems. Prior research has widely discussed the relevant issues about integrating sustainability aspects into innovation process; however, little empirical research has been conducted to analyse the link between sustainability-oriented innovation practices and the overall organisational performance. This paper addresses this gap by exploring the underlying structure of sustainability-oriented innovation practices as well as their effects on the particular performance dimensions (i.e. economic performance, quality performance, innovation performance, environmental performance and social performance). The large-scale web-based survey yielded 266 usable responses encompassing both the manufacturing and service industries across 5 countries: Germany, Poland, Serbia, Slovenia and Spain. The results of the regression analysis demonstrate that sustainability-oriented innovation practices are positively related with the overall organisational performance. The empirical evidence suggests that when organisations strongly emphasise sustainability practices, they can improve both economic and non-financial performance. From a practical perspective, the findings of the study may provide a clue regarding how organisations can embed sustainability aspects in their innovation processes with the aim of improving their performance.

  • 11.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Measuring quality in elderly care: possibilities and limitations of the vignette method2017In: Total quality management and business excellence (Online), ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 28, no 9-10, p. 1194-1207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Listening to citizens is seen as an important source of information about public service performance. In Sweden, to secure the quality of elderly care, the National Board of Health and Welfare conducts a yearly survey of in-home elderly care services and nursing homes. A central problem of the existing survey methodology is the interpersonal incomparability of survey responses due to differences in preferences and health conditions. One way to deal with this problem is to use the survey methodology with anchoring vignettes. The purpose of the paper is to investigate the possibilities and limitations of using anchoring vignettes as a general survey method and specifically to test the method for measuring elderly care quality. The vignettes were developed interactively with professionals working in elderly care and evaluated with 1600 users of in-home elderly care services and nursing homes. The results showed that anchoring vignettes reduce the impact of respondents personal characteristics on survey results. In general, anchoring vignettes give more robust answers that reduce the problem of incomparability. However, anchoring vignettes increase the complexity of the questionnaire and have limited value in elderly care. Our results indicate that the method might be applicable when using healthier and younger respondents.

  • 12.
    Potra, Sabina Alina
    et al.
    Polytech University of Timisoara, Romania.
    Izvercian, Monica
    Polytech University of Timisoara, Romania.
    Pavel Pugna, Adrian
    Polytech University of Timisoara, Romania.
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The HWWP, a refined IVA-Kano model for designing new delightful products or services2017In: Total quality management and business excellence (Online), ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 28, no 1-2, p. 104-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the last decade, companies have tried to survive in a continuous competitive global marketplace with informed and demanding customers for first-time-right delightful products and services. The present paper tries to answer the simple corporate question How to design a new product for customer delight? by exploring the relevant design requirements managers need to take into consideration for corporate strategic decision-making. After examining the ongoing debate regarding the theory of attractive quality, the Health Weapon Wealth Prospect (HWWP) model is proposed for new product or service design, which relates Maslows hierarchy of needs with the Kano methodology, importance of customer wants and the customer satisfaction coefficient. The result represents a theoretical contribution to the further development of the Kano model and a starting point for future explanatory research.

  • 13.
    Shin, Wan Seon
    et al.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlgaard-Park, Su Mi
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Kim, Min Gyu
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    A Quality Scorecard for the era of Industry 4.02018In: Total quality management and business excellence (Online), ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 29, no 9-10, p. 959-976Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Quality Scorecard (QSC) performance measurement model is proposed to evaluate the quality aspects of an organization in Industry 4.0. To design a QSC for the Fourth Industrial Revolution, we examined existing measures regarding costs of quality items. The measurement system was refined by simplifying duplicate measures and incorporating quality elements considered in recent international standard revisions. This paper explains the QSC system and its practical use. Two key results were obtained. First, the QSC measures were reduced from a total of 139 potential measures to 15, 30, and 60 for simple, general, and detailed models, respectively. Second, a so-called QSC wheel, a virtual tool to assess weaknesses in existing performance measurement systems, was developed. The QSC wheel may effectively be used in analysing existing performance measurement systems, and may also be applied to evaluate qualitative performance levels in Industry 4.0.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-12-14 15:06
  • 14.
    Thawesaengskulthai, Natcha
    et al.
    Chulalongkorn University, Thailand.
    Wongrukmit, Patcharin
    Chulalongkorn University, Thailand.
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hospital service quality measurement models: patients from Asia, Europe, Australia and America2015In: Total quality management and business excellence (Online), ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 26, no 9-10, p. 1029-1041Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how service quality in hospitals is perceived and measured among different groups of patients from four major continents (i.e. Asia, Europe, Australia and North America) who came to receive medical services in Thailand. Using stratified random sampling, data were collected from 2189 patients from 80 countries and four continents at six hospitals which provide healthcare services to international patients in Thailand. Four different models of measuring service quality based on different continents were developed with different numbers of quality dimensions and also a variation in the number of quality attributes. Asian patients provided a four-dimension model with 20 items; while a two-dimension model with 16 items was identified for European patients. Australian patients also revealed a two-dimension model but with 22 items, while patients from America provided a three-dimension model, also with 17 items. The study reveals that the development of service quality measurement models should not only consider context-specific items such as size and location, but should also include the nationality and demographic of the patient population. The findings also support that service quality has a significant impact on service satisfaction and the retention level of customers at the hospital. The concluded frameworks may guide healthcare providers to deliver better quality healthcare services and to sustain competitiveness.

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