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  • 1.
    Agnafors, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A Critical Comment on Collste2011In: Public Health Ethics, ISSN 1754-9973, E-ISSN 1754-9981, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 203-205Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article claims that the account of specification as a way to solve conflicts between rights, suggested by Göran Collste, is unsatisfactory. It is argued that specification is not a solution on its own, but is better described as a remedy in response to a political failure.

  • 2.
    Collste, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Centre for Applied Ethics.
    A Reply to Agnafors2011In: Public Health Ethics, ISSN 1754-9973, E-ISSN 1754-9981, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 303-304Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bærøe, Kristine
    Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Norway.
    Legitimate Policymaking: The Importance of Including Health-care Workers in Limit-Setting Decisions in Health care2014In: Public Health Ethics, ISSN 1754-9973, E-ISSN 1754-9981, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 123-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of legitimacy is often used and emphasized in the context of setting limits in health care, but rarely described is what is actually meant by its use. Moreover, it is seldom explicitly stated how health-care workers can contribute to the matter, nor what weight should be apportioned to their viewpoints. Instead the discussion has focused on whether they should take on the role of the patients’ advocate or that of gatekeeper to the society’s resources. In this article, we shed light on the role of health-care workers in limit setting and how their conferred legitimacy may support subordinators’ (i.e. citizens’) conferred legitimacy. We argue that health-care workers have an important role to play as both moral and political agents in limit setting, and delineate normative conditions that justify and facilitate health-care workers in conferring legitimacy on this kind of decision. Their role and potential impact on political limit setting does not—theoretically—affect the idea of democratic legitimacy negatively. Rather, as we suggest, by designing for limit-setting policymaking accordingly, health-care workers, as well as citizens, are more justified in conferring democratic legitimacy to health-care limit-setting decisions than if these concerns were not addressed.

  • 4.
    Nordgren, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Centre for Applied Ethics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Crisis management and public health: ethical principles for priority setting at a regional level in Sweden2015In: Public Health Ethics, ISSN 1754-9973, E-ISSN 1754-9981, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 72-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I analyse and discuss guidelines for priority setting in crisis management at a regional level in Sweden. The guidelines concern three types of crises: pandemics, large losses of electric power and interruptions in water supply. Pandemics are typical public health issues. Large losses of electric power and interruptions in water supply are in themselves not, but may have serious public health consequences. These guidelines are compared with guidelines for priority setting in health care. This is done because of the central position of health care in the management of many different types of crises. The comparison shows clear differences. In the analysis, I use a distinction between substantive principles of priority setting and process-oriented principles. Regarding substantive principles, I have found that the guidelines point in different directions. This seems acceptable, however, since they focus on different problems. Moreover, it seems possible to integrate the various context-dependent principles by relating them to higher order principles. Regarding process-oriented principles, I have found that how and to what extent these principles are applied in the guidelines vary. If we want to apply these principles in a more satisfying way, this would require a more systematic approach.

  • 5.
    Vilhelmsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Nordic School Public Heatlh.
    Svensson, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Meeuwisse, Anna
    Lund University.
    Mental Ill Health, Public Health and Medicalization2011In: Public Health Ethics, ISSN 1754-9973, E-ISSN 1754-9981, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 207-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    WHO suggests mental ill health in terms of depression to be the highest ranking disease problem in the developed world in 2020-2030 and claims a public health approach to be the most appropriate response. But some argue that the alarming reports on mental ill health have their ground in the methods of inquiry themselves and refer to medicalization as an important issue. The aim of this article is to explore and illuminate the issue of what is meant by mental health and mental ill health and what it means that mental ill health is a major public health problem. Basically, two understandings and aspects of public health exist: a reductionist and a holistic with connections to different theories of health. These diverging understandings may lead to quite different public health responses, and they may have different consequences with regard to medicalization. It is concluded that we need more clearly elaborated ways to think about public health so that the increased attention to mental ill health as a public health problem does not in itself lead to medicalization in terms of just medical treatment. Otherwise, we risk losing the importance of public health as an overarching social and political instrument.

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