liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 60
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aldred, Nick
    et al.
    Newcastle University.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Clare, Anthony S.
    Newcastle University.
    Real-Time Quantification of Microscale Bioadhesion Events In situ Using Imaging Surface Plasmon Resonance (iSPR)2011In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 2085-2091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From macro- to nanoscales, adhesion phenomena are all-pervasive in nature yet remain poorly understood. In recent years, studies of biological adhesion mechanisms, terrestrial and marine, have provided inspiration for "biomimetic" adhesion strategies and important insights for the development of fouling-resistant materials. Although the focus of most contemporary bioadhesion research is on large organisms such as marine mussels, insects and geckos, adhesion events on the micro/nanoscale are critical to our understanding of important underlying mechanisms. Observing and quantifying adhesion at this scale is particularly relevant for the development of biomedical implants and in the prevention of marine biofouling. However, such characterization has so far been restricted by insufficient quantities of material for biochemical analysis and the limitations of contemporary imaging techniques. Here, we introduce a recently developed optical method that allows precise determination of adhesive deposition by microscale organisms in situ and in real time; a capability not before demonstrated. In this extended study we used the cypris larvae of barnacles and a combination of conventional and imaging surface plasmon resonance techniques to observe and quantify adhesive deposition onto a range of model surfaces (CH(3)-, COOH-, NH(3)-, and mPEG-terminated SAMs and a PEGMA/HEMA hydrogel). We then correlated this deposition to passive adsorption of a putatively adhesive protein from barnacles. In this way, we were able to rank surfaces in order of effectiveness for preventing barnacle cyprid exploration and demonstrate the importance of observing the natural process of adhesion, rather than predicting surface effects from a model system. As well as contributing fundamentally to the knowledge on the adhesion and adhesives of barnacle larvae, a potential target for future biomimetic glues, this method also provides a versatile technique for laboratory testing of fouling-resistant chemistries.

  • 2.
    Apaydin, Dogukan H.
    et al.
    Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria.
    Gora, Monika
    University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Portenkirchner, Engelbert
    University of Innsbruck, Austria.
    Oppelt, Kerstin T.
    Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria.
    Neugebauer, Helmut
    Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria.
    Jakesoya, Marie
    Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria.
    Glowacki, Eric D.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kunze-Liebhaeuser, Julia
    University of Innsbruck, Austria.
    Zagorska, Malgorzata
    Warsaw University of Technology, Poland.
    Mieczkowski, Jozef
    University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Serdar Sariciftci, Niyazi
    Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria.
    Electrochemical Capture and Release of CO2 in Aqueous Electrolytes Using an Organic Semiconductor Electrode2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 15, p. 12919-12923Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing efficient methods for capture and controlled release of carbon dioxide is crucial to any carbon. capture and utilization technology. Herein we present an approach using an organic. semiconductor electrode to electrochemically capture dissolved CO2 in aqueous electrolytes. The process relies on electrochemical reduction of a thin film of a naphthalene bisimide derivative, 2,7,bis (4-(2- (2-ethylhexyl)thiazol-4-yl)phenyObenzo [lmn][3,8] phenanthroline-1,3,6,8(2H,7H)-tetraone (NBIT). This molecule is specifically tailored to afford one-electron reversible and one-electron quasi-reversible reduction in aqueous conditions while, not dissolving or degrading. The reduced NBIT reacts with CO2 to form a stable aemicarbonate salt, which can be subsequently oxidized electrochemically to release CO2. The semicarbonate structure is confirmed by in situ IR spectroelectrochemistry. This process of capturing and releasing carbon dioxide can be realized in an oxygen-free environment under ambient pressure and temperature, with uptake efficiency for CO2 capture of similar to 2.3 mmol g(-1). This is on par with the best solution-phase amine chemical capture technologies available today.

  • 3.
    Arbring Sjöström, Theresia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonsson, Amanda
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Gabrielsson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kergoat, Loig
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Aix Marseille University, France.
    Tybrandt, Klas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cross-Linked Polyelectrolyte for Improved Selectivity and Processability of lontronic Systems2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 36, p. 30247-30252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On-demand local release of biomolecules enables fine-tuned stimulation for the next generation of neuromodulation therapies. Such chemical stimulation is achievable using iontronic devices based on microfabricated, highly selective ion exchange membranes (IEMs). Current limitations in processability and performance of thin film LEMs hamper future developments of this technology. Here we address this limitation by developing a cationic IEM with excellent processability and ionic selectivity: poly(4-styrenesulfonic acidco-maleic acid) (PSS-co-MA) cross-linked with polyethylene glycol (PEG). This enables new design opportunities and provides enhanced compatibility with in vitro cell studies. PSSA-co-MA/PEG is shown to out-perform the cation selectivity of the previously used iontronic material.

  • 4.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Manchester, England.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    dos Santos, Renato B.
    Univ Fed Bahia, Brazil.
    Rivelino, Roberto
    Univ Fed Bahia, Brazil.
    Persson, Per O A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gueorguiev, Gueorgui Kostov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Self-Healing in Carbon Nitride Evidenced As Material Inflation and Superlubric Behavior2018In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 10, no 19, p. 16238-16243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All known materials wear under extended mechanical contacting. Superlubricity may present solutions, but is an expressed mystery in C-based materials. We report negative wear of carbon nitride films; a wear-less condition with mechanically induced material inflation at the nanoscale and friction coefficient approaching ultralow values (0.06). Superlubricity in carbon nitride is expressed as C-N bond breaking for reduced coupling between graphitic-like sheets and eventual N-2 desorption. The transforming surface layer acts as a solid lubricant, whereas the film bulk retains its high elasticity. The present findings offer new means for materials design at the atomic level, and for property optimization in wear-critical applications like magnetic reading devices or nanomachines.

  • 5.
    Bao, Qinye
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. East China Normal University, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Braun, Slawomir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Li, Yanqing
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Tang, Jianxin
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Duan, Chungang
    East China Normal University, Peoples R China.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Energy Level Alignment of N-Doping Fullerenes and Fullerene Derivatives Using Air-Stable Dopant2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 40, p. 35476-35482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Doping has been proved to be one of the powerful technologies to achieve significant improvement in the performance of organic electronic devices. Herein, we systematically map out the interface properties of solution-processed air-stable n-type (4(1,3-dimethyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-benzoimidazol-2-yl)phenyl) doping fullerenes and fullerene derivatives and establish a universal energy level alignment scheme for this class of n-doped system. At low doping levels at which the charge-transfer doping induces mainly bound charges, the energy level alignment of the n-doping organic semiconductor can be described by combining integer charger transfer-induced shifts with a so-called double-dipole step. At high doping levels, significant densities of free charges are generated and the charge flows between the organic film and the conducting electrodes equilibrating the Fermi level in a classic "depletion layer" scheme. Moreover, we demonstrate that the model holds for both n- and p-doping of pi-backbone molecules and polymers. With the results, we provide wide guidance for identifying the application of the current organic n-type doping technology in organic electronics.

  • 6.
    Bao, Qinye
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China; Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Braun, Slawomir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yang, Jianming
    East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Li, Yanqing
    Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Tang, Jianxin
    Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Duan, Chungang
    East China Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The Effect of Oxygen Uptake on Charge Injection Barriers in Conjugated Polymer Films2018In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 10, no 7, p. 6491-6497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The energy offset between the electrode Fermi level and organic semiconductor transport levels is a key parameter controlling the charge injection barrier and hence efficiency of organic electronic devices. Here, we systematically explore the effect of in situ oxygen exposure on energetics in n-type conjugated polymer P(NDI2OD-T2) films. The analysis reveals that an interfacial potential step is introduced for a series of P(NDI2OD-T2) electrode contacts, causing a nearly constant downshift of the vacuum level, while the ionization energies versus vacuum level remain constant. These findings are attributed to the establishment of a so-called double-dipole step via motion of charged molecules and will modify the charge injection barriers at electrode contact. We further demonstrate that the same behavior occurs when oxygen interacts with p-type polymer TQ1 films, indicating it is possible to be a universal effect for organic semiconductOrs.

  • 7.
    Ben Dkhil, Sadok
    et al.
    Aix Marseille University, France.
    Gaceur, Meriem
    Aix Marseille University, France.
    Karim Diallo, Abdou
    Aix Marseille University, France.
    Didane, Yahia
    Aix Marseille University, France.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Margeat, Olivier
    Aix Marseille University, France.
    Ackermann, Jorg
    Aix Marseille University, France.
    Videlot-Ackermann, Christine
    Aix Marseille University, France.
    Reduction of Charge-Carrier Recombination at ZnO Polymer Blend Interfaces in PTB7-Based Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells Using Regular Device Structure: Impact of ZnO Nanoparticle Size and Surfactant2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 20, p. 17257-17265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cathode interfacial layers, also called electron extraction layers (EELs), based on zinc oxide (ZnO) have been studied in polymer-blend solar cells toward optimization of the opto-electric properties. Bulk heterojunction solar cells based on poly( {4, 8-bis [(2- ethylhexyl) oxy]b enzo [1,2- b :4,5-b dithiophene-2,6-diyl}{3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]- thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediy1}) (PTB7) and [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC70BM) were realized in regular structure with all-solution-processed interlayers. A pair of commercially available surfactants, ethanolamine (EA) and ethylene glycol (EG), were used to modify the surface of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) in alcohol-based dispersion. The influence of ZnO particle size was also studied by preparing dispersions of two NP diameters (6 versus 11 nm). Here, we show that performance improvement can be obtained in polymer solar cells via the use of solution-processed ZnO EELs based on surface-modified nanoparticles. By the optimizing of the ZnO dispersion, surfactant ratio, and the resulting morphology of EELs, PTB7/PC70BM solar cells with a power-conversion efficiency of 8.2% could be obtained using small sized EG-modified ZnO NPs that allow the clear enhancement of the performance of solution processed photovoltaic devices compared to state-of-the-art ZnO-based cathode layers.

  • 8.
    Byeon, Ayeong
    et al.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA; Drexel University, PA 19104 USA; Korea Adv Institute Science and Technology, South Korea.
    Zhao, Meng-Qiang
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA; Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Ren, Chang E.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA; Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Halim, Joseph
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Drexel University, PA 19104 USA; Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Kota, Sankalp
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Urbankowski, Patrick
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Anasori, Babak
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Barsoum, Michel W.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Gogotsi, Yury
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Two-Dimensional Titanium Carbide MXene As a Cathode Material for Hybrid Magnesium/Lithium-Ion Batteries2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 4296-4300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As an alternative to pure lithium-ion, Lit, systems, a hybrid magnesium, Mg2+, and Li+ battery can potentially combine the high capacity, high voltage, and fast Li+ intercalation of Li-ion battery cathodes and the high capacity, low cost, and dendrite-free Mg metal anodes. Herein, we report on the use of two-dimensional titanium carbide, Ti3C2Tx (MXene), as a cathode in hybrid Mg2+/Li+ batteries, coupled with a Mg metal anode. Free-standing and flexible Ti3C2Tx/carbon nanotube composite "paper" delivered-,100 mAh at 0.1 C and similar to 50 mAh g(-1) at 10 C. At 1 C the capacity was maintained for amp;gt;500 cycles at 80 mAh g(-1). The Mo2CTx MXene also demonstrated good performance as a cathode material in this hybrid battery. Considering the variety of available MXenes, this work opens the door for exploring a new large family of 2D materials with high electrical conductivity and large intercalation capacity as cathodes for hybrid Mg2+/Li+ batteries.

  • 9.
    Cheung Mak, Wing
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kwan Yee, Cheung
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Orban, Jenny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Lee, Chyan-Jang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Surface-Engineered Contact Lens as an Advanced Theranostic Platform for Modulation and Detection of Viral Infection2015In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 7, no 45, p. 25487-25494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have demonstrated an entirely new concept of a wearable theranostic device in the form of a contact lens (theranostic lens) with a dual-functional hybrid surface to modulate and detect a pathogenic attack, using a the corneal HSV serotype-1 (HSV-1) model. The theranostic lenses were constructed using a facile layer-by-layer surface engineering technique, keeping the theranostic lenses with good surface wettability, optically transparency, and nontoxic toward human corneal epithelial cells. The theranostic lenses were used to capture and concentrate inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), which is upregulated during HSV-1 reactivation, for sensitive, noninvasive diagnostics. The theranostic lens also incorporated an antiviral coating to serve as a first line of defense to protect patients against disease. Our strategy tackles major problems in tear diagnostics that are mainly associated with the sampling of a relatively small volume of fluid and the low concentration of biomarkers. The theranostic lenses show effective anti-HSV-1 activity and good analytical performance for the detection of IL-1a, with a limit of detection of 1.43 pg mL(-1) and a wide linear range covering the clinically relevant region. This work offers a new paradigm for wearable noninvasive healthcare devices combining diagnosis and protection against disease, while supporting patient compliance. We believe that this approach holds immense promise as a next-generation point-of-care and decentralized diagnostic/theranostic platform for a range of biomarkers.

  • 10.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pettitt, Michala E
    University of Birmingham.
    Conlan, Sheelagh L
    Newcastle University.
    Du, Chun-Xia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Callow, Maureen E
    University of Birmingham.
    Callow, James A
    University of Birmingham.
    Mutton, Robert
    Newcastle University.
    Clare, Anthony S
    Newcastle University.
    D`Souza, Fraddry
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Donnelly, Glen
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Bruin, Anouk
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Willemsen, Peter R
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Su, Xueju J
    University of Dundee.
    Wang, Su
    University of Dundee.
    Zhao, Qi
    University of Dundee.
    Hederos, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Resistance of Galactoside-Terminated Alkanethiol Self-Assembled Monolayers to Marine Fouling Organisms2011In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 3, no 10, p. 3890-3901Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of galactoside-terminated alkanethiols have protein-resistance properties which can be tuned via the degree of methylation [Langmuir 2005, 21, 2971-2980]. Specifically, a partially methylated compound was more resistant to nonspecific protein adsorption than the hydroxylated or fully methylated counterparts. We investigate whether this also holds true for resistance to the attachment and adhesion of a range of marine species, in order to clarify to what extent resistance to protein adsorption correlates with the more complex adhesion of fouling organisms. The partially methylated galactoside-terminated SAM was further compared to a mixed monolayer of omega-substituted methyl- and hydroxyl-terminated alkanethiols with wetting properties and surface ratio of hydroxyl to methyl groups matching that of the galactoside. The settlement (initial attachment) and adhesion strength of four model marine fouling organisms were investigated, representing both micro- and macrofoulers; two bacteria (Cobetia marina and Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus), barnacle cypris larvae (Balanus amphitrite), and algal zoospores (Ulva linza). The minimum in protein adsorption onto the partially methylated galactoside surface was partly reproduced in the marine fouling assays, providing some support for a relationship between protein resistance and adhesion of marine fouling organisms. The mixed alkanethiol SAM, which was matched in wettability to the partially methylated galactoside SAM, consistently showed higher settlement (initial attachment) of test organisms than the galactoside, implying that both wettability and surface chemistry are insufficient to explain differences in fouling resistance. We suggest that differences in the structure of interfacial water may explain the variation in adhesion to these SAMs.

  • 11.
    Elfwing, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cai, Wanzhu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Xia, Yuxin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tang, Zheng
    Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    DNA Based Hybrid Material for Interface Engineering in Polymer Solar Cells2018In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 9579-9586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new solution processable electron transport material (ETM) is introduced for use in photovoltaic devices, which consists of a metallic conjugated polyelectrolyte, poly(4-(2,3-dihydrothieno[3,4-b]-[1,4]dioxin-2-yl-methoxy)-1-butanesulfonic acid (PEDOT-S), and surfactant-functionalized deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (named DNA:CTMA:PEDOT-S). This ETM is demonstrated to effectively work for bulk-heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices (OPV) based on different electron acceptor materials. The fill factor, the open circuit voltage, and the overall power conversion efficiency of the solar cells with a DNA:CTMA:PEDOT-S modified cathode are comparable to those of devices with a traditional lithium fluoride/aluminum cathode. The new electron transport layer has high optical transmittance, desired work function and selective electron transport. A dipole effect induced by the use of the surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTMA) is responsible for lowering the electrode work function. The DNA:CTMA complex works as an optical absorption dilutor, while PEDOT-S provides the conducting pathway for electron transport, and allows thicker layer to be used, enabling printing. This materials design opens a new pathway to harness and optimize the electronic and optical properties of printable interface materials.

  • 12.
    Elie, Margaux
    et al.
    Normandie University, France.
    Sguerra, Fabien
    CEA, France.
    Di Meo, Florent
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Weber, Michael D.
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Marion, Ronan
    Normandie University, France.
    Grimault, Adele
    Normandie University, France.
    Lohier, Jean-Francois
    Normandie University, France.
    Stallivieri, Aurelie
    Normandie University, France.
    Brosseau, Arnaud
    Paris Saclay University, France; Paris Saclay University, France.
    Pansu, Robert B.
    Paris Saclay University, France; Paris Saclay University, France.
    Renaud, Jean-Luc
    Normandie University, France.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hamel, Matthieu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. CEA, France.
    Costa, Ruben D.
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Gaillard, Sylvain
    Normandie University, France.
    Designing NHC-Copper(I) Dipyridylamine Complexes for Blue Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells2016In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 8, no 23, p. 14678-14691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents the influence of various substituents on the photophysical features of heteroleptic copper(I) complexes bearing both N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) and dipyridylamine (dpa = dipyridylamine skeleton corresponding to ligand L1) ligands. The luminescent properties have been compared to our recently reported archetypal blue emitting [Cu(IPr)(dpa)][PF6] complex. The choice of the substituents on both ligands has been guided to explore the effect of the electron donor/acceptor and "push-pull" on the emission wavelengths and photoluminescence quantum yields. A selection of the best candidates in terms of their photophysical features were applied for developing the first blue light emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) based on copper(I) complexes. The device analysis suggests that the main concern is the moderate redox stability of the complexes under high applied driving currents, leading to devices with moderate stabilities pointing to a proof-of-concept for further development. Nevertheless, under low applied driving currents the blue emission is stable, showing performance levels competitive to those reported for blue LECs baged on iridium(III) complexes. Overall, this work provides valuable guidelines to tackle the design of enhanced NHC copper complexes for lighting applications in the near future.

  • 13.
    Fabiano, Simone
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ferroelectric Polarization Induces Electric Double Layer Bistability in Electrolyte-Gated Field-Effect Transistors2014In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 438-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dense surface charges expressed by a ferroelectric polymeric thin film induce ion displacement within a polyelectrolyte layer and vice versa. This is because the density of dipoles along the surface of the ferroelectric thin film and its polarization switching time matches that of the (Helmholtz) electric double layers formed at the ferroelectric/polyelectrolyte and polyelectrolyte/semiconductor interfaces. This combination of materials allows for introducing hysteresis effects in the capacitance of an electric double layer capacitor. The latter is advantageously used to control the charge accumulation in the semiconductor channel of an organic field-effect transistor. The resulting memory transistors can be written at a gate voltage of around 7 V and read out at a drain voltage as low as 50 mV. The technological implication of this large. difference between write and read-out voltages lies in the non-destructive reading of this ferroelectric memory.

  • 14.
    Felekidis, Nikolaos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Melianas, Armantas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Design Rule for Improved Open-Circuit Voltage in Binary and Ternary Organic Solar Cells2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 42, p. 37070-37077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mixing different compounds to improve functionality is one of the pillars of the organic electronics field. Here, the degree to which the charge transport properties of the constituent materials are simply additive when materials are mixed is quantified. It is demonstrated that in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells, hole mobility in the donor phase depends critically on the choice of the acceptor material, which may alter the energetic disorder of the donor. The same holds for electron mobility and disorder in the acceptor. The associated mobility differences can exceed an order of magnitude compared to pristine materials. Quantifying these effects by a state-filling model for the open-circuit voltage (V-oc) of ternary Donor:Acceptor(l):Acceptor(2) (D:A(1):A(2)) organic solar cells leads to a physically transparent description of the surprising, nearly linear tunability of the Voc with the A(1):A(2) weight ratio. It is predicted that in binary OPV systems, suitably chosen donor and acceptor materials can improve the device power conversion efficiency (PCE) by several percentage points, for example from 11 to 13.5% for a hypothetical state-ofthe-art organic solar cell, highlighting the importance of this design rule.

  • 15.
    Franco Gonzalez, Felipe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Autonomous Univ Madrid, Spain.
    Rolland, Nicolas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Substrate-Dependent Morphology and Its Effect on Electrical Mobility of Doped Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) Thin Films2018In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 10, no 34, p. 29115-29126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deposition dynamics, crystallization, molecular packing, and electronic mobility of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) thin films are affected by the nature of the substrate. Computational microscopy has been carried out to reveal the morphology-substrate dependence for PEDOT thin films doped with molecular tosylate deposited on different substrates including graphite, Si3N4, silicon, and amorphous SiO2. It is shown that the substrate is instrumental in formation of the lamellar structure. PEDOT films on the ordered substrates (graphite, Si3N4, and silicon) exhibit preferential face-on orientation, with graphite showing the most ordered and pronounced face-on packing. In contrast, PEDOT on amorphous SiO2 exhibits the dominant edge-on orientation, except in the dry state where both packings are equally presented. The role of water and the porosity of the substrate in formation of the edge-on structure on SiO2 is outlined. On the basis of the calculated morphology, the multiscale calculations of the electronic transport and percolative analysis are performed outlining how the character of the substrate affects the electron mobility. It is demonstrated that good crystallinity (PEDOT on graphite substrate) and high content of edge-on (PEDOT on SiO2 substrate) are not enough to achieve the highest electrical in-plane mobility. Instead, the least ordered material with lower degree of the edge-on content (PEDOT on silicon substrate) provides the highest mobility because it exhibits an efficient network of pi-pi stacked chain extending throughout the entire sample.

  • 16.
    Fredj, Donia
    et al.
    Univ Sfax, Tunisia.
    Pourcin, Florent
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Alkarsifi, Riva
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Kilinc, Volkan
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ben Dkhil, Sadok
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Boudjada, Nassira Chniba
    CNRS, France.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Videlot-Ackermann, Christine
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Margeat, Olivier
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Ackermann, Joerg
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Boujelbene, Mohamed
    Univ Sfax, Tunisia.
    Fabrication and Characterization of Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Electron Extraction Layers for Polymer Solar Cells toward Improved Processing Robustness and Air Stability2018In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 10, no 20, p. 17309-17317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials composed of bismuth and diaminopyridine are studied as novel materials for electron extraction layers in polymer solar cells using regular device structures. The hybrid materials are solution processed on top of two different low band gap polymers (PTB7 or PTB7-Th) as donor materials mixed with fullerene PC70BM as the acceptor. The intercalation of the hybrid layer between the photoactive layer and the aluminum cathode leads to solar cells with a power conversion efficiency of 7.8% because of significant improvements in all photovoltaic parameters, that is, short-circuit current density, fill factor, and open-circuit voltage, similar to the reference devices using ZnO as the interfacial layer. However when using thick layers of such hybrid materials for electron extraction, only small losses in photocurrent density are observed in contrast to the reference material ZnO of pronounced losses because of optical spacer effects. Importantly, these hybrid electron extraction layers also strongly improve the device stability in air compared with solar cells processed with ZnO interlayers. Both results underline the high potential of this new class of hybrid materials as electron extraction materials toward robust processing of air stable organic solar cells.

  • 17.
    Gorbunov, Andrey V.
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Haedler, Andreas T.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Putzeys, Tristan
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Zha, R. Helen
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Schmidt, Hans-Werner
    University of Bayreuth, Germany.
    Kivala, Milan
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Urbanaviciute, Indre
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wubbenhorst, Michael
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Meijer, E. W.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Switchable Charge Injection Barrier in an Organic Supramolecular Semiconductor2016In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 8, no 24, p. 15535-15542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We disclose a supramolecular material that combines semiconducting and dipolar functionalities. The material consists of a discotic semiconducting carbonyl-bridged triarylamine core, which is surrounded by three dipolar amide groups. In thin films, the material self-organizes in a hexagonal columnar fashion through Jr-stacking of the molecular core and hydrogen bonding between the amide groups. Alignment by an electrical field in a simple metal/semiconductor/metal geometry induces a polar order in the interface layers near the metal contacts that can be reversibly switched, while the bulk material remains nonpolarized. On suitably chosen electrodes, the presence of an interfacial polarization field leads to a modulation of the barrier for charge injection into the semiconductor. Consequently, a reversible switching is possible between a high-resistance, injection-limited off-state and a low-resistance, space-charge-limited on-state. The resulting memory diode shows switchable rectification with on/off ratios of up to two orders of magnitude. This demonstrated multifunctionality of a single material is a promising concept toward possible application in lowcost, large-area, nonvolatile organic memories.

  • 18.
    Gryszel, Maciej
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sytnyk, Mykhailo
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany; Energie Campus Nurnberg EnCN, Germany.
    Jakesova, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Romanazzi, Giuseppe
    Politecn Bari, Italy.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Heiss, Wolfgang
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany; Energie Campus Nurnberg EnCN, Germany.
    Glowacki, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    General Observation of Photocatalytic Oxygen Reduction to Hydrogen Peroxide by Organic Semiconductor Thin Films and Colloidal Crystals2018In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 10, no 16, p. 13253-13257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low-cost semiconductor photocatalysts offer unique possibilities for industrial chemical transformations and energy conversion applications. We report that a range of organic semiconductors are capable of efficient photocatalytic oxygen reduction to H2O2 in aqueous conditions. These semiconductors, in the form of thin films, support a 2-electron/2-proton redox cycle involving photoreduction of dissolved O-2 to H2O2, with the concurrent photooxidation of organic substrates: formate, oxalate, and phenol. Photochemical oxygen reduction is observed in a pH range from 2 to 12. In cases where valence band energy of the semiconductor is energetically high, autoxidation competes with oxidation of the donors, and thus turnover numbers are low. Materials with deeper valence band energies afford higher stability and also oxidation of H2O to O-2. We found increased H2O2 evolution rate for surfactant-stabilized nanoparticles versus planar thin films. These results evidence that photochemical O-2 reduction may be a widespread feature of organic semiconductors, and open potential avenues for organic semiconductors for catalytic applications.

  • 19.
    Guo, Yiting
    et al.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China; Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Yanfeng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhu, Qinglian
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Li, Cheng
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Jin, Yingzhi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Puttisong, Yuttapoom
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Feng
    Hebei Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Fengling
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ma, Wei
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Li, Weiwei
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Effect of Side Groups on the Photovoltaic Performance Based on Porphyrin-Perylene Bisimide Electron Acceptors2018In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 10, no 38, p. 32454-32461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, we developed four porphyrin-based small molecular electron acceptors for non-fullerene organic solar cells, in which different side groups attached to the porphyrin core were selected in order to achieve optimized performance. The molecules contain porphyrin as the core, perylene bisimides as end groups, and the ethynyl unit as the linker. Four side groups, from 2,6-di(dodecyloxy)phenyl to (2-ethylhexyl)thiophen-2-yl, pentadecan-7-yl, and 3,5-di(dodecyloxy)phenyl unit, were applied into the electron acceptors. The new molecules exhibit broad absorption spectra from 300 to 900 nm and high molar extinction coefficients. The molecules as electron acceptors were applied into organic solar cells, showing increased power conversion efficiencies from 1.84 to 5.34%. We employed several techniques, including photoluminescence spectra, electroluminescence spectra, atomic force microscopy, and grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray to probe the blends to find the effects of the side groups on the photovoltaic properties. We found that the electron acceptors with 2,6-di(dodecyloxy)phenyl units show high-lying frontier energy levels, good crystalline properties, and low nonradiative recombination loss, resulting in possible large phase separation and low energy loss, which is responsible for the low performance. Our results provide a detailed study about the side groups of non-fullerene materials, demonstrating that porphyrin can be used to design electron acceptors toward near-infrared absorption.

  • 20.
    Hwang, Sunbin
    et al.
    KIST, South Korea.
    Jang, Sukjae
    KIST, South Korea.
    Kang, Minji
    KIST, South Korea.
    Bae, Sukang
    KIST, South Korea.
    Lee, Seoung-Ki
    KIST, South Korea.
    Hong, Jae-Min
    KIST, South Korea.
    Lee, Sang Hyun
    Chonnam Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Wang, Gunuk
    Korea Univ, South Korea.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kim, Tae-Wook
    KIST, South Korea.
    Two-in-One Device with Versatile Compatible Electrical Switching or Data Storage Functions Controlled by the Ferroelectricity of P(VDF-TrFE) via Photocrosslinking2019In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 11, no 28, p. 25358-25368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic electronics demand new platforms that can make integrated circuits and undergo mass production while maintaining diverse functions with high performance. The field-effect transistor has great potential to be a multifunctional device capable of sensing, data processing, data storage, and display. Currently, transistor-based devices cannot be considered intrinsic multifunctional devices because all installed functions are mutually coupled. Such incompatibilities are a crucial barrier to developing an all-in-one multifunctional device capable of driving each function individually. In this study, we focus on the decoupling of electric switching and data storage functions in an organic ferroelectric memory transistor. To overcome the incompatibility of each function, the high permittivity needed for electrical switching and the ferroelectricity needed for data storage become compatible by restricting the motion of poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) via photocrosslinking with bis-perfluorobenzoazide. The two-in-one device consisting of a photocrosslinked ferroelectric layer exhibits reversible and individual dual-functional operation as a typical transistor with nonvolatile memory. Moreover, a p-MOS depletion load inverter composed of the two transistors with different threshold voltages is also demonstrated by simply changing only one of the threshold voltages by polarization switching. We believe that the two-in-one device will be considered a potential component of integrated organic logic circuits, including memory, in the future.

  • 21.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Jiang
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engquist, Isak
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Time-Resolved Chemical Mapping in Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 2747-2757Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An understanding of the doping and ion distributions in light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) is required to approach a realistic conduction model which can precisely explain the electrochemical reactions, p-n junction formation, and ion dynamics in the active layer and to provide relevant information about LECs for systematic improvement of function and manufacture. Here, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy is used to monitor anion density profile and polymer structure in situ and for time-resolved mapping of electrochemical doping in an LEC under bias. The results are in very good agreement with the electrochemical doping model with respect to ion redistribution and formation of a dynamic p-n junction in the active layer. We also physically slow ions by decreasing the working temperature and study frozen-junction formation and immobilization of ions in a fixed-junction LEC device by FTIR imaging. The obtained results show irreversibility of the ion redistribution and polymer doping in a fixed-junction device. In addition, we demonstrate that infrared microscopy is a useful tool for in situ characterization of electroactive organic materials.

  • 22.
    Jiang, Haiying
    et al.
    South China University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Zhen
    South China University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Lianjie
    South China University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Zhong, Anxing
    South China University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Xuncheng
    South China University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Pan, Feilong
    South China University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Wanzhu, Cai
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Yi
    Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, CA 94720 USA.
    Chen, Junwu
    South China University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Cao, Yong
    South China University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    A Highly Crystalline Wide-Band-Gap Conjugated Polymer toward High-Performance As-Cast Nonfullerene Polymer Solar Cells2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 41, p. 36061-36069Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new wide-band-gap conjugated polymer PBODT was successfully synthesized that showed high crystallinity and was utilized as, the active material in nonfullerene bulk-heterojunction, polymer solar cells (PSCs). The photovoltaic devices based on the as-cast blend films of PBODT with ITIC and IDIC acceptors showed notable power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 7.06% and 9:09%, with high open-circuit voltages of 1.00 and 0.93 V that correspond to low energy losses of 0.59 and 0.69 eV, respectively. In the case of PBODT:ITIC, lower exciton quenching efficiency and monomolecular recombination are found for devices with small driving force. On the other hand, the relatively higher driving force and suppressed monomolecular recombination for PBODT:IDIC devices are identified to be the reason for their higher short-circuit current density (J(sc)) and higher PCEs. In addition, when processed with the nonchlorinated solvent 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, a good, PCE of 8.19% was still, achieved for the IDIC-based device. Our work shows that such wide-band-gap polymers have great potential for the environmentally friendly fabrication of highly efficient PSCs.

  • 23.
    Jo, Young Jin
    et al.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ SKKU, South Korea.
    Kwon, Ki Yoon
    Sungkyunkwan Univ SKKU, South Korea.
    Ullah Khan, Zia
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kim, Tae-il
    Sungkyunkwan Univ SKKU, South Korea.
    Gelatin Hydrogel-Based Organic Electrochemical Transistors and Their Integrated Logic Circuits2018In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 10, no 45, p. 39083-39090Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We suggest gelatin hydrogel as an electrolyte and demonstrate organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) based on a sheet of gelatin. We also modulate electrical characteristics of the OECT with respect to pH condition of the gelatin hydrogel from acid to base and analyze its characteristics based on the electrochemical theory. Moreover, we extend the gelatin-based OECT to electrochemical logic circuits, for example, NOT, NOR, and NAND gates.

  • 24.
    Kesters, Jurgen
    et al.
    Hasselt University, Belgium.
    Govaerts, Sanne
    Hasselt University, Belgium.
    Pirotte, Geert
    Hasselt University, Belgium.
    Drijkoningen, Jeroen
    Hasselt University, Belgium.
    Chevrier, Michele
    University of Montpellier, France; University of Mons UMONS, Belgium.
    Van den Brande, Niko
    Vrije University of Brussel, Belgium.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Van Mele, Bruno
    Vrije University of Brussel, Belgium.
    Lutsen, Laurence
    Hasselt University, Belgium.
    Vanderzande, Dirk
    Hasselt University, Belgium.
    Manca, Jean
    Hasselt University, Belgium.
    Clement, Sebastien
    University of Montpellier, France.
    Von Hauff, Elizabeth
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Maes, Wouter
    Hasselt University, Belgium.
    High-Permittivity Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Interlayers for High-Performance Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells2016In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 8, no 10, p. 6309-6314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE) interfacial layers present a powerful way to boost the I-V characteristics of organic photovoltaics. Nevertheless, clear guidelines with respect to the structure of high-performance interlayers are still lacking. In this work, impedance spectroscopy is applied to probe the dielectric permittivity of a series of polythiophene-based CPEs. The presence of ionic pendant groups grants the formation of a capacitive double layer, boosting the charge extraction and device efficiency. A counteracting effect is the diminishing affinity with the underlying photoactive layer. To balance these two effects, we found copolymer structures containing nonionic side chains to be beneficial.

  • 25.
    Khaldi, Alexandre
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Falk, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bengtsson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Maziz, Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Robinson, Nathaniel D
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin W. H.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Patterning highly conducting conjugated polymer electrodes for soft and flexible microelectrochemical devices2018In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 10, no 17, p. 14978-14985Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for soft actuators in various biomedical applications in order to manipulate delicate objects such as cells and tissues. Soft actuators are able to adapt to any shape and limit the stress applied to delicate objects. Conjugated polymer actuators, especially in the so-called trilayer configuration, are interesting candidates for driving such micromanipulators. However, challenges involved in patterning the electrodes in a trilayer with individual contact have prevented further development of soft micromanipulators based on conjugated polymer actuators. To allow such patterning, two printing-based patterning techniques have been developed. First an oxidant layer is printed using either syringe-based printing or micro-contact printing, followed by vapor phase polymerization of the conjugated polymer. Sub-millimeter patterns with electronic conductivities of 800 Scm-1 are obtained. Next, laser ablation is used to cleanly cut the final device structures including the printed patterns, resulting in fingers with individually controllable digits and miniaturized hands. The methods presented in this paper will enable integration of patterned electrically active conjugated polymer layers in many types of complex 3-D structures.

  • 26.
    Li, Wei
    et al.
    Chalmers, Sweden; S China University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Daojuan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wang, Suhao
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ma, Wei
    Xi An Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China.
    Hedstrom, Svante
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ian James, David
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Xu, Xiaofeng
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Persson, Petter
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huang, Fei
    S China University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Ergang
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    One-Step Synthesis of Precursor Oligomers for Organic Photovoltaics: A Comparative Study between Polymers and Small Molecules2015In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 7, no 49, p. 27106-27114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two series of oligomers TQ and rhodanine end-capped TQ-DR were synthesized using a facile one-step method. Their optical, electrical, and thermal properties and photovoltaic performances were systematically investigated and compared. The TQ series of oligomers were found to be amorphous, whereas the TQ-DR series are semicrystalline. For the TQ oligomers, the results obtained in solar cells show that as the chain length of the oligomers increases, an increase in power conversion efficiency (PCE) is obtained. However, when introducing 3-ethylrhodanine into the TQ oligomers as end groups, the PCE of the TQ-DR series of oligomers decreases as the chain length increases. Moreover, the TQ-DR series of oligomers give much higher performances compared to the original amorphous TQ series of oligomers owing to the improved extinction coefficient (epsilon) and crystallinity afforded by the rhodanine. In particular, the highly crystalline oligomer TQ5-DR, which has the shortest conjugation length shows a high hole mobility of 0.034 cm(2) V-1 s(-1) and a high PCE of 3.14%, which is the highest efficiency out of all of the six oligomers. The structure-property correlations for all of the oligomers and the TQ1 polymer demonstrate that structural control of enhanced intermolecular interactions and crystallinity is a key for small molecules/oligomers to achieve high mobilities, which is an essential requirement for use in OPVs.

  • 27.
    Li, Xiaodong
    et al.
    Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China; University of Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Wenjun
    Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Xueyan
    Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China; University of Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fang, Junfeng
    Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China.
    Disodium Edetate As a Promising Interfacial Material for Inverted Organic Solar Cells and the Device Performance Optimization2014In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 6, no 23, p. 20569-20573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disodium edetate (EDTA-Na), a popular hexadentate ligand in analytical chemistry, was successfully introduced in organic solar cells (OSCs) as cathode interfacial layer. The inverted OSCs with EDTA-Na showed superior performance both in power conversion efficiency and devices stability compared with conventional devices. Interestingly, we found that the performance of devices with EDTA-Na could be optimized through external bias treatment. After optimization, the efficiency of inverted OSCs with device structure of ITO/EDTA-Na/polymer thieno[3,4-b]thiophene/benzodithiophene (PTB7):PC71BM/MoO3/Al was significantly increased to 8.33% from an initial value of 6.75%. This work introduces a new class of interlayer materials, small molecule electrolytes, for organic solar cells.

  • 28.
    Liu, Alei
    et al.
    Jinan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zheng, Wenhao
    Jinan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Yin, Xiaolong
    Jinan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Junyu
    Jinan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Lin, Yuanbao
    Jinan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Cai, Wanzhu
    Jinan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Yu, Xiaomin
    Jinan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Liang, Quanbin
    South China Univ Technol, Peoples R China.
    He, Zhicai
    South China Univ Technol, Peoples R China.
    Wu, Hongbin
    South China Univ Technol, Peoples R China.
    Li, Yang
    Wuyi Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Fengling
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Jinan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Hou, Lintao
    Jinan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Manipulate Micrometer Surface and Nanometer Bulk Phase Separation Structures in the Active Layer of Organic Solar Cells via Synergy of Ultrasonic and High-Pressure Gas Spraying2019In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 11, no 11, p. 10777-10784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For organic solar cells, the vertical and lateral micro-/nanometer-scale structure in the active layer largely determines the device performance. In this work, the surface and bulk domain size of the photoactive layer are successfully manipulated with a facile two-step spraying method, that is, an ultrathin active layer by high-pressure spraying is deliberately stacked on top of the thick active layer by ultrasonic spraying. Thus, the morphology is effectively optimized with the comprehensive study of optical and electrical characteristics, such as photon absorption, exciton dissociation efficiency, and bimolecular recombination. Moreover, the novel method can be used not only in the fullerene system but also in the nonfullerene system, demonstrating the remarkable universality through this synergy method. This work provides an easy and reliable strategy to improve photovoltaic device performance in the industrial large-area spray-coating process.

  • 29.
    Liu, Jian
    et al.
    Chinese Academic Science, Changchun, China.
    Wu, Jiang
    Chinese Academic Science, Changchun, China.
    Shao, Shuyan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Deng, Yunfeng
    Chinese Academic Science, Changchun, China; University of Chinese Academic Science, Beijing, China.
    Meng, Bin
    Chinese Academic Science, Changchun, China; University of Chinese Academic Science, Beijing, China.
    Xie, Zhiyuan
    Chinese Academic Science, Changchun, China.
    Geng, Yanhou
    Chinese Academic Science, Changchun, China.
    Wang, Lixiang
    Chinese Academic Science, Changchun, China.
    Zhang, Fengling
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Printable highly conductive conjugated polymer sensitized ZnO NCs as cathode interfacial layer for efficient polymer solar cells2014In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 6, no 11, p. 8237-8245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a facile way to produce printable highly conductive cathode interfacial layer (CIL) for efficient polymer solar cells (PSCs) by sensitizing ZnO nanocrystals (NCs) with a blue fluorescent conjugated polymer, poly(9, 9-bis-(6-diethoxylphosphorylhexyl) fluorene) (PFEP). Herein, PFEP plays dual distinctive roles in the composite. Firstly, PFEP chains can effectively block the aggregation of ZnO NCs, leading to uniform and smooth film during solution processing via assembly on ZnO NC surfaces through their pending phosphonate groups. Secondly, PFEP can greatly improve the conductivity of ZnO NCs by charge transfer doping, that is the charge transfer from the sensitizer driven by electron-chemical potential equilibrium, which could be even more pronounced under light illumination because of light excitation of PFEP sensitizer. The increased conductivity in ZnO-PFEP layer renders more efficient electron transport and extraction compared to pristine ZnO layer. This ZnO-PFEP CIL was successfully applied to PSCs based on three polymer donor systems with different band-gaps, and efficiency enhancements from 44 to 70% were observed compared to those PSCs with pristine ZnO CIL. The highest efficiency of 7.56% was achieved in P(IID-DTC):PC70BM-based PSCs by using ZnO-PFEP film as CIL. Moreover, the enhanced conductivity due to the charge-transfer doping effect allows thick ZnO-PFEP film to be used as CIL in high-performance PSCs. Both the high conductivity and good film-forming properties of ZnO-PFEP CIL are favorable for large-scale printable PSCs, which is also verified by high-efficiency PSCs with ZnO-PFEP CIL fabricated using doctor-blading, a large-scale processing technique. The work provides an efficient printable cathode interfacial material for efficient PSCs.

  • 30.
    Liu, Jiang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engquist, Isak
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Organic Reprogrammable Circuits Based on Electrochemically-Formed Diodes2014In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 6, no 15, p. 13266-13270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To simplify the integration of organic electronics, we demonstrate a method for constructing reprogrammable circuits based on organic diodes. The organic p‐n junction diodes consisting of an organic polymers poly[2‐methoxy‐5‐(2‐ethylhexyloxy)‐1,4‐phenylenevinylene and an electrolyte were formed by electrochemical doping at 70 °C, and stabilized at ‐30 °C. The reversible electrochemical reaction allows for the in‐situ change of the polarity of the organic p‐n junction. By forming diodes with different polarity at different locations, several circuits can be created, such as, logic gates, voltage limiter and AC/DC converter. The as‐made circuitry can be erased and turned into circuitry with other functionality. For example, the diodes of an AND gate can be re‐programmed to form an OR gate. The reprogrammable circuits contain merely two core layers, electrodes and active material, which is promising for large‐area and fully‐printed reconfigurable circuits with facile fabrication.

  • 31.
    Moser, Thierry
    et al.
    University of S Australia, Australia; ETH, Switzerland.
    Celma, Coralie
    University of S Australia, Australia; University of Strasbourg, France.
    Lebert, Audrey
    University of S Australia, Australia; Polytech Institute Bordeaux, France.
    Charrault, Eric
    University of S Australia, Australia.
    Brooke, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Murphy, Peter J.
    University of S Australia, Australia.
    Browne, Gareth
    Contamac Ltd, England.
    Young, Richard
    Contamac Ltd, England.
    Higgs, Timothy
    Contamac Ltd, England.
    Evans, Drew
    University of S Australia, Australia.
    Hydrophilic Organic Electrodes on Flexible Hydrogels2016In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 974-982Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prompted by the rapidly developing field of wearable electronics, research into biocompatible substrates and coatings is intensifying. Acrylate-based hydrogel polymers have gained widespread use as biocompatible articles in applications such as contact and intraocular lenses. Surface treatments and/or coatings present one strategy to further enhance the performance of these hydrogels or even realize novel functionality. In this study, the conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) is deposited from the vapor phase onto hydrated hydrogel substrates and blended with biocompatibilizing coconstituents incorporating polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) moieties. Plasma pretreatment of the dehydrated hydrogel substrate modifies its surface topography and chemical composition to facilitate the attachment of conductive PEDOT-based surface layers. Manipulating the vapor phase polymerization process and constituent composition, the PEDOT-based coating is engineered to be both hydrophilic (i.e. to promote biocompatibility) and highly conductive. The fabrication of this conductively coated hydrogel has implications for the future of wearable electronic devices.

  • 32.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Musumeci, Chiara
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Imaging the Phase Separation Between PEDOT and Polyelectrolytes During Processing of Highly Conductive PEDOT:PSS Films2015In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 7, no 35, p. 19764-19773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Treating PEDOT:PSS (Clevios) with certain additives, such as ethylene glycol (EG), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and sorbitol, has been shown to increase the conductivity of this material from roughly 1 to nearly 1000 S/cm. Using a slow drying method, we show that the additive induced a separation between free PSS and reorganized PEDOT:PSS complexes in the highly conductive PEDOT:PSS films. Additives (DMSO, DEG, and PEG 400) were included in PEDOT:PSS aqueous dispersions at large volume fractions. The mixtures were slowly dried under room conditions. During drying, the evaporation of water resulted in an additive-rich solvent mixture from which the reorganized PEDOT:PSS complexes aggregated " into a dense film while free PSS remained in the solution. Upon complete drying, PSS formed a transparent rim film around the conducting PEDOT film. The chemical compositions of the two phases were studied using an infrared microscope. This removal of PSS resulted in more compact packing of PEDOT molecules, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscope measurements suggested the enrichment of PEDOT on the film surface after PSS separation. Through a simple drying process in an additive-containing dispersion, the conductivity of PEDOT films increased from 0.1 to 200-400 S/cm. Through this method, we confirmed the existence of two phases in additive-treated and highly conductive PEDOT:PSS films. The proper separation between PSS and PEDOT will be of relevance in designing strategies to process high-performance plastic electrodes.

  • 33.
    Parlak, Onur
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ashaduzzaman, Md.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Kollipara, Suresh B.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. UCS, Tekidag AB, SE-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Switchable Bioelectrocatalysis Controlled by Dual Stimuli-Responsive Polymeric Interface2015In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 7, no 43, p. 23837-23847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The engineering of bionanointerfaces using stimuli-responsive polymers offers a new dimension in the design of novel bioelectronic interfaces. The integration of electrode surfaces with stimuli-responsive molecular cues provides a direct control and ability to switch and tune physical and chemical properties of bioelectronic interfaces in various biodevices. Here, we report a dual-responsive biointerface employing a positively responding dual-switchable polymer, poly(NIPAAm-co-DEAEMA)-b-HEAAm, to control and regulate enzyme-based bioelectrocatalysis. The design interface exhibits reversible activation deactivation of bioelectrocatalytic reactions in response to change in temperature and in pH, which allows manipulation of biomolecular interactions to produce on/off switchable conditions. Using electrochemical measurements, we demonstrate that interfacial bioelectrochemical properties can be tuned over a modest range of temperature (i.e., 20-60 degrees C) and pH (i.e., pH 4-8) of the medium. The resulting dual-switchable interface may have important implications not only for the design of responsive biocatalysis and on-demand operation of biosensors, but also as an aid to elucidating electron-transport pathways and mechanisms in living organisms by mimicking the dynamic properties of complex biological environments and processes.

  • 34.
    Parlak, Onur
    et al.
    Izmir Institute of Technology, Turkey.
    Demir, Mustafa M.
    Izmir Institute of Technology, Turkey.
    Toward Transparent Nanocomposites Based on Polystyrene Matrix and PMMA-Grafted CeO2Nanoparticles2011In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 3, no 11, p. 4306-4314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The association of transparent polymer and nanosize d pigment particles offers attr active optical materials for various potential and existing applications. However, the particles embedded into polymers scatter light due to refractive index (RI) mismatch andre duce transp arency of the resulting compos ite material. In this stud y, optical composites ba sedon polys tyrene (PS ) matrix and poly( methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-grafted CeO2hybridparticles were prepared. CeO2 nanoparticles with an aver age diameter of 18 ( 8 nm wereprecipitated by trea ting Ce(NO3)36H2O with urea in the presen ce of a polyme rizablesurfa ctant, 3-metha cyloxypropy ltrimetho xy silane. PMM A chains were grafted on the surfa ceof the nanopa rticles upon free radical in situ solution polymerization. While blend ing ofunm odi fied CeO2 parti cles with PS resulted in opaquefi lms, the trans parenc y of the compos itefi lms was remark ably enhanced when prepa red by PMMA -grafte d CeO2hybrid parti cles,parti cularly those havin g a PMMA thick ness of 9 nm. The impro vement in transparenc y ispresu mably due to the reduction in RI misma tch betwee n CeO2part icles and the PS m atrix wh en using PMM A chains at theinterface.

  • 35.
    Paul, Biplab
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nanostructural Tailoring to Induce Flexibility in Thermoelectric Ca3Co4O9 Thin Films2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 30, p. 25308-25316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Because of their inherent rigidity and brittleness, inorganic materials have seen limited use in flexible thermoelectric applications. On the other hand, for high output power density and stability, the use of inorganic materials is required. Here, we demonstrate a concept of fully inorganic flexible thermoelectric thin films with Ca3Co4O9-on-mica. Ca3Co4O9 is promising not only because of its high Seebeck coefficient and good electrical conductivity but also because of the abundance, low cost, and nontoxicity of its constituent raw materials. We show a promising nanostructural tailoring approach to induce flexibility in inorganic thin-film materials, achieving flexibility in nanostructured Ca3Co4O9 thin films. The films were grown by thermally induced phase transformation from CaO-CoO thin films deposited by reactive rf-magnetron cosputtering from metallic targets of Ca and Co to the final phase of Ca3Co4O9 on a mica substrate. The pattern of nanostructural evolution during the solid-state phase transformation is determined by the surface energy and strain energy contributions, whereas different distributions of CaO and CoO phases in the as-deposited films promote different nanostructuring during the phase transformation. Another interesting fact is that the Ca3Co4O9 film is transferable onto an arbitrary flexible platform from the parent mica substrate by etch-free dry transfer. The highest thermoelectric power factor obtained is above 1 x 10(-4) W m(-1) K-2 in a wide temperature range, thus showing low-temperature applicability of this class of materials.

  • 36.
    Poxson, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bonisoli, Alberto
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Ist Italiano Tecnol, Italy; St Anna Sch Adv Studies, Italy.
    Linderhed, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Res Inst Sweden, Sweden.
    Abrahamsson, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Matthiesen, Isabelle
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Tybrandt, Klas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Capillary-Fiber Based Electrophoretic Delivery Device2019In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 11, no 15, p. 14200-14207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic electronic ion pumps (OEIPs) are versatile tools for electrophoretic delivery of substances with high spatiotemporal resolution. To date, OEIPs and similar iontronic components have been fabricated using thin-film techniques and often rely on laborious, multistep photolithographic processes. OEIPs have been demonstrated in a variety of in vitro and in vivo settings for controlling biological systems, but the thin-film form factor and limited repertoire of polyelectrolyte materials and device fabrication techniques unnecessarily constrain the possibilities for miniaturization and extremely localized substance delivery, e.g., the greater range of pharmaceutical compounds, on the scale of a single cell. Here, we demonstrate an entirely new OEIP form factor based on capillary fibers that include hyperbranched polyglycerols (dPGs) as the selective electrophoretic membrane. The dPGs enable electrophoretic channels with a high concentration of fixed charges and well-controlled cross-linking and can be realized using a simple one-pot fluidic manufacturing protocol. Selective electrophoretic transport of cations and anions of various sizes is demonstrated, including large substances that are difficult to transport with other OEIP technologies. We present a method for tailoring and characterizing the electrophoretic channels fixed charge concentration in the operational state. Subsequently, we compare the experimental performance of these capillary OEIPs to a computational model and explain unexpected features in the ionic current for the transport and delivery of larger, lower-mobility ionic compounds. From this model, we are able to elucidate several operational and design principles relevant to miniaturized electrophoretic drug delivery technologies in general. Overall, the compactness of the capillary OEIP enables electrophoretic delivery devices with probelike geometries, suitable for a variety of ionic compounds, paving the way for less-invasive implantation into biological systems and for healthcare applications.

  • 37.
    Pupkaite, Justina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Ahumada, Manuel
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Mclaughlin, Sarah
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Temkit, Moho
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Alaziz, Sura
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Seymour, Richard
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Ruel, Marc
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Kochevar, Irene
    Harvard Medical Sch, MA USA.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Suuronen, Erik J.
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Alarcon, Emilio I.
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Collagen-Based Photoactive Agent for Tissue Bonding2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 11, p. 9265-9270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a combination of methacrylated, collagen and the photosensitizer rose Bengal, a new light-activated biomimetic material for tissue sutureless bonding was developed. This formulation was cross-linked using green light. In vivo tests in mice demonstrate the suitability of the material for sutureless wound closure.

  • 38.
    Ravichandran, Ranjithkumar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Martinez Gil, Jose Gabriel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Type I Collagen-Derived Injectable Conductive Hydrogel Scaffolds as Glucose Sensors2018In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 10, no 19, p. 16244-16249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advent of home blood glucose monitoring revolutionized diabetes management, and the recent introduction of both wearable devices and closed-loop continuous systems has enormously impacted the lives of people with diabetes. We describe the first fully injectable soft electrochemical glucose sensor for in situ monitoring. Collagen, the main component of a native extracellular matrix in humans and animals, was used to fabricate an in situ gellable self-supporting electroconductive hydrogel that can be injected onto an electrode surface or into porcine meat to detect glucose amperometrically. The study provides a proof-of-principle of an injectable electrochemical sensor suitable for monitoring tissue glucose levels that may, with further development, prove clinically useful in the future.

  • 39.
    Rawat, P.K.
    et al.
    Indian Institute Technology, India .
    Paul, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Banerji, P.
    Indian Institute Technology, India .
    Exploration of Zn Resonance Levels and Thermoelectric Properties in I-Doped PbTe with ZnTe Nanostructures2014In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 3995-4004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivated by the theoretically predicted Zn resonant states in the conduction band of PbTe, in the present work, we investigated the effect of Zn substitution on the thermoelectric properties in I-doped n-type PbTe. The room temperature thermopower values show good agreement with the theoretical Pisarenko plot of PbTe up to a carrier concentration of 4.17 X 10(19) cm(-3); thus, the presence of Zn resonance levels is not observed. Because of the low solubility of Zn in PbTe, a second phase of coherent ZnTe nanostructures is observed within the PbTe host matrix, which is found to reduce the lattice thermal conductivity. The reduced lattice thermal conductivity in PbTe by ZnTe nanostructures leads to notable enhancement in the figure of merit with a maximum value of 1.35 at 650 K. In contrast to the recent literature, the carrier mobility is not found to be affected by the band offset between ZnTe nanostructures and PbTe. This is explained by the quantum tunneling of the charge carrier through the narrow offset barrier and depletion width and coherent nature of the interface boundary between the two phases, i.e., ZnTe and PbTe.

  • 40.
    Ryan, Jason D.
    et al.
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Alemu Mengistie, Desalegn
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lund, Anja
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Mueller, Christian
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Machine-Washable PEDOT:PSS Dyed Silk Yarns for Electronic Textiles2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 10, p. 9045-9050Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Durable, electrically conducting yarns are a critical component of electronic textiles (e-textiles). Here, such yarns with exceptional wear and wash resistance are realized through dyeing silk from the silkworm Bombyx mori with the conjugated polymer:polyelectrolyte complex PEDOT:PSS. A high Youngs modulus of approximately 2 GPa combined with a robust and scalable dyeing process results in up to 40 m long yarns that maintain their bulk electrical conductivity of approximately 14 S cm(-1) when experiencing repeated bending stress as well as mechanical wear during sewing. Moreover, a high degree of ambient stability is paired with the ability to withstand both machine washing and dry cleaning. For the potential use for e-textile applications to be illustrated, an in-plane thermoelectric module that comprises 26 p-type legs is demonstrated by embroidery of dyed silk yarns onto a piece of felted wool fabric.

  • 41.
    Sadollah Khani, Azar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz, Iran.
    Hatamie, Amir
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz, Iran.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zargar, Behrooz
    Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz, Iran.
    Kazeminezhad, Iraj
    Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz, Iran.
    Colorimetric Disposable Paper Coated with ZnO@ZnS Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Detection of Copper Ions in Aqueous Solutions2014In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 6, no 20, p. 17694-17701Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we have proposed a new nanoparticle-containing test paper sensor that could be used as an inexpensive, easy-to-use, portable, and highly selective sensor to detect Cu2+ ions in aqueous solutions. This disposable paper sensor is based on ZnO@ZnS core-shell nanoparticles. The core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized using a chemical method and then they were used for coating the paper. The synthesis of the ZnO@ZnS core-shell nanoparticles was performed at a temperature as low as 60 degrees C, and so far this is the lowest temperature for the synthesis of such core-shell nanoparticles. The sensitivity of the paper sensor was investigated for different Cu2+ ion concentrations in aqueous solutions and the results show a direct linear relation between the Cu2+ ions concentration and the color intensity of the paper sensor with a visual detection limit as low as 15 mu M (similar to 0.96 ppm). Testing the present paper sensor on real river turbulent water shows a maximum 5% relative error for determining the Cu2+ ions concentration, which confirms that the presented paper sensor can successfully be used efficiently for detection in complex solutions with high selectivity. Photographs of the paper sensor taken using a regular digital camera were transferred to a computer and analyzed by ImageJ Photoshop software. This finding demonstrates the potential of the present disposable paper sensor for the development of a portable, accurate, and selective heavy metal detection technology.

  • 42.
    Schmidt, Susann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hänninen, Tuomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Goyenola, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wissting, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Goebbels, Nico
    IHI Ionbond AG, Switzerland.
    Tobler, Markus
    IHI Ionbond AG, Switzerland.
    Högberg, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    SiNx Coatings Deposited by Reactive High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering: Process Parameters Influencing the Nitrogen Content2016In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 8, no 31, p. 20386-20396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (rHi-PIMS) was used to deposit silicon nitride (SiNx) coatings for biomedical applications. The SiNx growth and plasma characterization were conducted in an industrial coater, using Si targets and N-2 as reactive gas. The effects of different N-2-to-Ar flow ratios between 0 and 0.3, pulse frequencies, target power settings, and substrate temperatures on the discharge and the N content of SiNx coatings were investigated. Plasma ion mass spectrometry shows high amounts of ionized isotopes during the initial part of the pulse for discharges with low N-2-to-Ar flow ratios of amp;lt;0.16, while signals from ionized molecules rise with the N-2-to-Ar flow ratio at the pulse end and during pulse off times. Langmuir probe measurements show electron temperatures of 2-3 eV for nonreactive discharges and 5.0-6.6 eV for discharges in transition mode. The SiNx coatings were characterized with respect to their composition, chemical bond structure, density, and mechanical properties by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray reflectivity, X-ray diffraction, and nanoindentation, respectively. The SiNx deposition processes and coating properties are mainly influenced by the Nz-to-Ar flow ratio and thus by the N content in the SiNx films and to a lower extent by the HiPIMS frequencies and power settings as well as substrate temperatures. Increasing N2-to-Ar flow ratios lead to decreasing growth rates, while the N content, coating densities, residual stresses, and the hardness increase. These experimental findings were corroborated by density functional theory calculations of precursor species present during rHiPIMS.

  • 43.
    Shao, Shuyan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zheng, Kaibo
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Pullerits, Tonu
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Zhang, Fengling
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Enhanced Performance of Inverted Polymer Solar Cells by Using Poly(ethylene oxide)-Modified ZnO as an Electron Transport Layer2013In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 380-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we report enhanced performance of inverted polymer solar cells composed of poly[2,3-bis-(3-octyloxyphenyl)quinoxaline-5,8-diyl-alt-thiophene-2,5-diyl] (TQ1):[6,6]-phenyl-C-71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) blends by using poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-modified ZnO as an electron transport layer. It is found that PEO modification to the ZnO nanoparticle surface can effectively passivate the surface traps of ZnO, suppress the recombination loss of carriers, reduce the series resistance, and improve the electrical coupling of ZnO/active layer. Consequently, both the short-circuit current (J(SC)) and the fill factor (FF) of the inverted solar cells are considerably improved. The resulting power conversion efficiency (PCE) is improved to 5.64% as compared to 4.5% of the reference device using a ZnO electron transport layer. Moreover, this approach can also successfully improve the J(SC) and FF of anther inverted solar cell composed of poly[N-9 -hepta-decanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4,7-dithienyl-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)] (PCDTBT):PC71BM blends. The PCE of the device based on the PEO-modified ZnO layer is increased to 6.59% from 5.39% of the reference device based on the ZnO layer.

  • 44.
    Sharma, Deepali
    et al.
    Durban University of Technology, South Africa.
    Ashaduzzaman, Md.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Golabi, Mohsen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Shriwastav, Amritanshu
    Indian Institute Technology, India.
    Bisetty, Krishna
    Durban University of Technology, South Africa.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Kanpur 208016, Uttar Pradesh, India..
    Studies on Bacterial Proteins Corona Interaction with Saponin Imprinted ZnO Nanohoneycombs and Their Toxic Responses2015In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 7, no 43, p. 23848-23856Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular imprinting generates robust, efficient, and highly mesoporous surfaces for biointeractions. Mechanistic interfacial interaction between the surface of core substrate and protein corona is crucial to understand the substantial microbial toxic responses at a nanoscale. In this study, we have focused on the mechanistic interactions between synthesized saponin imprinted zinc oxide nanohoneycombs (SIZnO NHs), average size 80-125 nm, surface area 20.27 m(2)/g, average pore density 0.23 pore/nm and number-average pore size 3.74 nm and proteins corona of bacteria. The produced SIZnO NHs as potential antifungal and antibacterial agents have been studied on Sclerotium rolfsii (S. rolfsii), Pythium debarynum (P. debarynum) and Escherichia coil (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), respectively. SIZnO NHs exhibited the highest antibacterial (similar to 50%) and antifungal (similar to 40%) activity against Gram-negative bacteria (E. coil) and fungus (P. debarynum), respectively at concentration of 0.1 mol. Scanning electron spectroscopy (SEM) observation showed that the ZnO NHs ruptured the cell wall of bacteria and internalized into the cell. The molecular docking studies were carried out using binding proteins present in the gram negative bacteria (lipopolysaccharide and lipocalin Blc) and gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcal Protein A, SpA). It was envisaged that the proteins present in the bacterial cell wall were found to interact and adsorb on the surface of SIZnO NHs thereby blocking the active sites of the proteins used for cell wall synthesis. The binding affinity and interaction energies were higher in the case of binding proteins present in gram negative bacteria as compared to that of gram positive bacteria. In addition, a kinetic mathematical model (KMM) was developed in MATLAB to predict the internalization in the bacterial cellular uptake of the ZnO NHs for better understanding of their controlled toxicity. The results obtained from KMM exhibited a good agreement with the experimental data. Exploration of mechanistic interactions, as well as the formation of bioconjugate of proteins and ZnO NHs would play a key role to interpret more complex biological systems in nature.

  • 45.
    Sun, Kai
    et al.
    Jilin University, Changchun, China.
    Chen, Haobin
    Jilin University, Changchun, China.
    Wang, Lei
    Jilin University, Changchun, China.
    Yin, Shengyan
    Jilin University, Changchun, China.
    Wang, Haiyu
    Jilin University, Changchun, China.
    Xu, Gaixia
    Shenzhen University, China .
    Chen, Danni
    Shenzhen University, China .
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wu, Changfeng
    Jilin University, Changchun, China.
    Qin, Weiping
    Jilin University, Changchun, China.
    Size-Dependent Property and Cell Labeling of Semiconducting Polymer Dots2014In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 6, no 13, p. 10802-10812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots) represent a new class of fluorescent nanoparticles for biological applications. In this study, we investigated their size-dependent fluorescence and cellular labeling properties. We demonstrate that the polymer conformation in solution phase largely affects the polymer folding and packing during the nanoparticle preparation process, resulting in solution-phase control over the fluorescence properties of semiconducting polymer nanoparticles. The resulting Pdots exhibit apparent size dependent absorption and emission, a characteristic feature of different chain packing behaviors due to the preparation conditions. Single-particle fluorescence imaging was employed to perform a side-by-side comparison on the Pdot brightness, indicating a quadratic dependence of single-particle brightness on particle size. Upon introducing a positively charged dye Nile blue, all the three type of Pdots were quenched very efficiently (K-sv greater than 1 x 10(7) M-1) in an applied quenching process at low dye concentrations, but exhibit apparent difference in quenching efficiency with increasing dye concentration. Furthermore, Pdots of different sizes were used for cell uptake and cellular labeling involving biotin-streptavidin interactions. Fluorescence imaging together with flow cytometry studies clearly showed size dependent labeling brightness. Small-sized Pdots appear to be more effective for immunolabeling of cell surface, whereas medium-sized Pdots exhibit the highest uptake efficiency. This study provides a concrete guidance for selecting appropriate particle size for biological imaging and sensing applications.

  • 46.
    Tan, Yeshu
    et al.
    Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zou, Yatao
    Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Wu, Linzhong
    Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Huang, Qi
    Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Di
    Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Chen, Min
    Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Ban, Muyang
    Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Wu, Chen
    Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Wu, Tian
    Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Bai, Sai
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Song, Tao
    Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Qiao
    Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Baoquan
    Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Highly Luminescent and Stable Perovskite Nanocrystals with Octylphosphonic Acid as a Ligand for Efficient Light-Emitting Diodes2018In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 3784-3792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All inorganic perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) of CsPbX3 (X = Cl, Br, I, or their mixture) are regarded as promising candidates for high-performance light-emitting diode (LED) owing to their high photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) and easy synthetic process. However, CsPbX3 NCs synthesized by the existing methods, where oleic acid (OA) and oleylamine (OLA) are generally used as surface-chelating ligands, suffer from poor stability due to the ligand loss, which drastically deteriorates their PL QY, as well as dispersibility in solvents. Herein, the OA/OLA ligands are replaced with octylphosphonic acid (OPA), which dramatically enhances the CsPbX3 stability. Owing to a strong interaction between OPA and lead atoms, the OPA-capped CsPbX3 (OPA-CsPbX3) NCs not only preserve their high PL QY (amp;gt;90%) but also achieve a high-quality dispersion in solvents after multiple purification processes. Moreover, the organic residue in purified OPA-CsPbBr3 is only similar to 4.6%, which is much lower than similar to 29.7% in OA/OLA-CsPbBr3. Thereby, a uniform and compact OPA-CsPbBr3 film is obtained for LED application. A green LED with a current efficiency of 18.13 cd A(-1), corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of 6.5%, is obtained. Our research provides a path to prepare high-quality perovskite NCs for high-performance optoelectronic devices.

  • 47.
    Volpi, Riccardo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nassau, Racine
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nörby, Morten
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Theoretical Study of the Charge-Transfer State Separation within Marcus Theory: The C-60-Anthracene Case Study2016In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 8, no 37, p. 24722-24736Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study, within Marcus theory, the possibility of the charge-transfer (CT) state splitting at organic interfaces and a subsequent transport of the free charge carriers to the electrodes. As a case study we analyze model anthracene-C-60 interfaces. Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations on the cold CT state were performed at a range of applied electric fields, and with the fields applied at a range of angles to the interface to simulate the action of the electric field in a bulk heterojunction (BHJ) interface. The results show that the inclusion of polarization in our model increases CT state dissociation and charge collection. The effect of the electric field on CT state splitting and free charge carrier conduction is analyzed in detail with and without polarization. Also, depending on the relative orientation of the anthracene and C-60 molecules at the interface, CT state splitting shows different behavior with respect to both applied field strength and applied field angle. The importance of the hot CT in helping the charge carrier dissociation is also analyzed in our scheme.

  • 48.
    Wannapob, Rodtichoti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Prince Songkla University, Thailand.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Yu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Sichuan Agriculture University, Peoples R China.
    Thavarungkul, Panote
    Prince Songkla University, Thailand.
    Kanatharana, Proespichaya
    Prince Songkla University, Thailand.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Printable Heterostructured Bioelectronic Interfaces with Enhanced Electrode Reaction Kinetics by Intermicroparticle Network2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 38, p. 33368-33376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Printable organic bioelectronics provide a fast and cost-effective approach for the fabrication of novel biodevices, while the general challenge is to achieve optimized reaction kinetics at multiphase boundaries between biomolecules and electrodes. Here, we present an entirely new concept based on a modular approach for the construction of heterostructured bioelectronic interfaces by using tailored functional "biological microparticles" combined with "transducer micro particles" as modular building blocks. This approach offers high versatility for the design and fabrication of bioelectrodes with a variety of forms of interparticle spatial organization, from layered structures to more advance bulk heterostructured architectures. The heterostructured biocatalytic electrodes delivered twice the reaction rate and a six-fold increase in the effective diffusion kinetics in response to a catalytic model using glucose as the substrate, together with the advantage of shortened diffusion paths for reactants between multiple interparticle junctions and large active particle surface. The consequent benefits of this improved performance combined with the simple means of mass production are of major significance for the emerging printed electronics industry.

  • 49.
    Xu, Weidong
    et al.
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    McLeod, John A.
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Yingguo
    Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Yimeng
    Soochow University, Peoples R China; Beijing University of Technology, Peoples R China; Beijing University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Wu, Zhongwei
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Bai, Sai
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yuan, Zhongcheng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Song, Tao
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Yusheng
    Soochow University, Peoples R China; Beijing University of Technology, Peoples R China; Beijing University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Si, Junjie
    Zhejiang University, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Rongbin
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Xingyu
    Chinese Academic Science, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Xinping
    Beijing University of Technology, Peoples R China; Beijing University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Lijia
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Baoquan
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Iodomethane-Mediated Organometal Halide Perovskite with Record Photoluminescence Lifetime2016In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 8, no 35, p. 23181-23189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organometallic lead halide perovskites are excellent light harvesters for high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. However, as the key component in these devices, a perovskite thin film with good morphology and minimal trap states is still difficult to obtain. Herein we show that by incorporating a low boiling point alkyl halide such as iodomethane (CH3I) into the precursor solution, a perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3-xClx) film with improved grain size and orientation can be easily achieved. More importantly, these films exhibit a significantly reduced amount of trap states. Record photoluminescence lifetimes of more than 4 mu s are achieved; these lifetimes are significantly longer than that of pristine CH3NH3PbI3-xClx films. Planar heterojunction solar cells incorporating these CH3I-mediated perovskites have demonstrated a dramatically increased power conversion efficiency compared to the ones using pristine CH3NH3PbI3-xClx. Photoluminescence, transient absorption, and microwave detected photoconductivity measurements all provide consistent evidence that CH3I addition increases the number of excitons generated and their diffusion length, both of which assist efficient carrier transport in the photovoltaic device. The simple incorporation of alkyl halide to enhance perovskite surface passivation introduces an important direction for future progress on high efficiency perovskite optoelectronic devices.

  • 50.
    Yandi, Wetra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mieszkin, Sophie
    University of Birmingham, England .
    Martin-Tanchereau, Pierre
    Int Paint Ltd, England Northumbria University, England .
    Callow, Maureen E.
    University of Birmingham, England .
    Callow, James A.
    University of Birmingham, England .
    Tyson, Lyndsey
    Int Paint Ltd, England .
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hydration and Chain Entanglement Determines the Optimum Thickness of Poly(HEMA-co-PEG(10)MA) Brushes for Effective Resistance to Settlement and Adhesion of Marine Fouling Organisms2014In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 6, no 14, p. 11448-11458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding how surface physicochemical properties influence the settlement and adhesion of marine fouling organisms is important for the development of effective and environmentally benign marine antifouling coatings. We demonstrate that the thickness of random poly(HEMA-co-PEG(10)DMA) copolymer brushes affect antifouling behavior. Films of thicknesses ranging from 50 to 1000 angstrom were prepared via surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization and characterized using infrared spectroscopy, ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy and contact angle measurements. The fouling resistance of these films was investigated by protein adsorption, attachment of the marine bacterium Cobetia marina, settlement and strength of attachment tests of zoospores of the marine alga Ulva linza and static immersion field tests. These assays show that the polymer film thickness influenced the antifouling performance, in that there is an optimum thickness range, 200-400 angstrom (dry thickness), where fouling of all types, as well as algal spore adhesion, was lower. Field test results also showed lower fouling within the same thickness range after 2 weeks of immersion. Studies by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and underwater captive bubble contact angle measurements show a strong correlation between lower fouling and higher hydration, viscosity and surface energy of the poly(HEMA-co-PEG(10)MA) brushes at thicknesses around 200-400 angstrom. We hypothesize that the reduced antifouling performance is caused by a lower hydration capacity of the polymer for thinner films, and that entanglement and crowding in the film reduces the conformational freedom, hydration capacity and fouling resistance for thicker films.

12 1 - 50 of 60
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf