liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Calmunger, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chai, Guocai
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansson, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Moverare, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Influence of deformation rate on mechanical response of an AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel2014In: Advanced Materials Research, ISSN 1022-6680, E-ISSN 1662-8985, Vol. 922, p. 49-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Austenitic stainless steels are often used for components in demanding environment. These materials can withstand elevated temperatures and corrosive atmosphere like in energy producing power plants. They can be plastically deformed at slow strain rates and high alternating or constant tensile loads such as fatigue and creep at elevated temperatures. This study investigates how deformation rates influence mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel. The investigation includes tensile testing using strain rates of 2*10-3/ and 10-6/s at elevated temperatures up to 700°C. The material used in this study is AISI 316L. When the temperature is increasing the strength decreases. At a slow strain rate and elevated temperature the stress level decreases gradually with increasing plastic deformation probably due to dynamic recovery and dynamic recrystallization. However, with increasing strain rate elongation to failure is decreasing. AISI 316L show larger elongation to failure when using a strain rate of 10-6/s compared with 2*10-3/s at each temperature. Electron channelling contrast imaging is used to characterize the microstructure and discuss features in the microstructure related to changes in mechanical properties. Dynamic recrystallization has been observed and is related to damage and cavity initiation and propagation.

  • 2.
    Gåård, Anders
    et al.
    Karlstad University.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Karlstad University.
    Krakhmalev, Pavel
    Karlstad University.
    Broitman, Esteban
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nano-scale friction of multi-phase powder metallurgy tool steels2015In: Advanced Materials Research, ISSN 1022-6680, E-ISSN 1662-8985, Vol. 1119, p. 70-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Friction is a fundamental phenomenon in tribology involving complex mechanisms between thecontacting surfaces. Measurements of friction are often made using devices with substantially largercontact area than dimensions corresponding to microstructural features of the materials. Hence, for multi-phase materials,influence of particular microstructural constituents is not resolved. In the present work, a tribometerwith a contact area in the nano-scale range was used to map friction for different types of tool steelswith different chemical- and phase composition. Owing to the small tip radius, frictionalcharacteristics of primary carbides and the steel matrix were measured and compared. Dependingon chemical composition, a difference was observed where the coefficient of friction wasapproximately twice higher for the steel possessing highest coefficient of friction, including bothcarbides and the steel matrix.

  • 3.
    Holtz, Per Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hsu, Chi-Wei
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundskog, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson, K. Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Forsberg, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Janzén, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Deterministic Single InGaN Quantum Dots grown on GaN Micro-Pyramid Arrays2013In: Advanced Materials Research, ISSN 1022-6680, E-ISSN 1662-8985, Vol. 646, p. 34-37Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    InGaN quantum dots (QDs) formed on top of GaN pyramids have been fabricated by means of selective area growth employing hot wall MOCVD. Upon regrowth of a patterned substrate, the growth will solely occur in the holes, which evolve into epitaxially grown wurtzite based pyramids. These pyramids are subsequently overgrown by a thin optically active InGaN well. The QDs are preferably nucleating at the apices of the pyramids as evidenced by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The emission from these QDs have been monitored by means of microphotoluminescence (µPL), in which single emission lines have been detected with a sub-meV line width. The µPL measurements undoubtedly reveal that the QDs are located in the apexes of the pyramids, since the sharp emission peaks can only be monitored as the excitation laser is focused on the apices in the µPL. It is also demonstrated that the emission energy can be changed in a controlled way by altering the growth conditions, like the growth temperature and/or composition, for the InGaN layers. The tip of the GaN pyramid is on the nm scale and can be made sharp or slightly truncated. TEM analysis combined with µPL results strongly indicate that the Stranski-Krastanow growth modepreferably is taking place at the microscopic c-plane truncation of the GaN pyramid. Single emission lines with a high degree of polarization is a common feature observed for individual QDs. This emission remains unchanged with increasing the excitation power and sample temperature. An in-plane elongated QD forming a shallow potential with an equal number of electrons and holes is proposed to explain the observed characteristics of merely a single exciton emission with a high degree of polarization.

  • 4.
    Kangas, Pasi
    et al.
    Sandvik Materials Technology, Sandviken, Sweden.
    Chai, Guocai
    Sandvik Materials Technology, Sandviken, Sweden.
    Use of Advanced Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steels for Applications in Oil & Gas and Process Industry2013In: Advanced Materials Research, ISSN 1022-6680, E-ISSN 1662-8985, Vol. 794, p. 645-669Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stainless steels are widely used in the Oil & Gas and chemical process industry. This group of materials is today available in a large variety of alloy compositions, and practically all product forms needed for a construction are available. A historical view and application examples are given on the stainless steel evolution, from the standard grades used in chemical processes to todays most advanced applications in the chemical and oil & gas industry, where demands on reliable and long lasting solutions are necessary. The influence of alloying elements on the properties and manufacturability is described. The chemical industry is a very wide definition of a large group of industries with very different products, from plastics and organic acids to fertilizers, drugs and pesticides. Applications of stainless steels within the chemical industry are described. The first example is organic acids, where the use of high alloyed duplex stainless steels such as UNS S32205 and UNS S32750 have been successful. Another example is phosphoric acid applications, where the aggressiveness of the process solution depends very much on the fluoride and chloride content of the rock phosphate. In sulfuric acid, the material of construction is very much dependent on the acid concentration and temperature. Nitric acid is another common fertilizer acid which is highly oxidizing, and thereby demands stainless steels with high chromium content but with low molybdenum contents. The Oil & Gas industry uses very high quantities of carbon steel and stainless steel in their constructions. The oil wells are defined as sweet when the well contains carbon dioxide and no substantial amounts of hydrogen sulfide, when there is hydrogen sulfide present in the well, the wells are defined as sour. An overview on materials depending on the application is given. In subsea applications, hydraulic control lines (umbilicals) are used for control of valves and for methanol injection in subsea platforms. UNS S32750 is a high strength duplex stainless steel which today is the first choice for umbilicals and has been chosen for a very large amount of umbilical projects worldwide. The newly developed hyper duplex stainless steels with a combination of even higher corrosion resistance and strength are introduced for applications in oil-gas industry. The possibilities with stainless steels are endless, and new alloys are constantly being developed to meet industrial challenges of today and in the future. By choosing the right stainless steel grade, it is possible to find a solution to almost all challenges in the Oil & Gas and Process industry.

  • 5.
    Moverare, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sato, Atsushi
    Dept of Metallurgy and Materials, University in Birmingham, UK.
    Johansson, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hasselqvist, Magnus
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery, Finspång.
    Reed, Roger
    Dept of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, UK.
    Kanesund, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Simonsson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    On Localized Deformation and Recrystallization as Damage Mechanisms during Thermomechanical Fatigue of Single Crystal Nickel-Based Superalloys2011In: Advanced Materials Research, ISSN 1022-6680, E-ISSN 1662-8985, Vol. 278, no 278, p. 357-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) in superalloys is growing in importance due to the introduction of advanced cooling systems but also due to the changes in demand and competition within the power generation market; this is requiring many power plants to operate under cyclic conditions. In this paper the TMF behaviour of three different single crystal nickel-based superalloys are compared. It is demonstrated that the deformation and damage mechanisms occurring during TMF are rather different from those traditionally reported for creep or isothermal fatigue. In all cases examined, the deformation is localized within a rather small number of deformation bands. While these bands were found to consist mainly of micro-twins in some alloys, in others they might be better described as slip or shear bands. Furthermore, in some circumstances these bands are prone to recrystallization. In CMSX-4, the intersection points of twins of different orientation act as initiation sites for this process. In the SCA425 alloy – of smaller gamma’ content, lower creep resistance and less great oxidation resistance – twinning is observed infrequently; however the deformation is still very localized and in the distorted gamma-gamma’ microstructure, along the shear bands, recrystallization is observed. Furthermore the recrystallization is enhanced by oxidation due to the development of a gamma’-depleted zone. In CMSX-4, TCP phases precipitated during long term ageing cause a more dispersed deformation behaviour which prevents recrystallization. Our findings confirm the importance of an inhomogeneous microstructure for good TMF resistance.

  • 6.
    Sato, Atsushi
    et al.
    Dept of Metallurgy and Materials, University in Birmingham, UK.
    Moverare, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hasselqvist, Magnus
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, Finspång.
    Reed, Roger
    Dept of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, UK.
    On The Oxidation Resistance of Nickel-Based Superalloys2011In: Advanced Materials Research, ISSN 1022-6680, E-ISSN 1662-8985, Vol. 278, p. 174-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the factors influencing the oxidation resistance of superalloys are studied. A model is proposed by which the Al2O3-forming properties of a given composition can be estimated, based upon the thermodynamic and kinetic factors influencing scale growth. The numerical modelling is tested by experimental work on a number of compositional variants of the newly-developed SCA425+ superalloy, which contains appreciable quantities of Cr. The modelling is shown to be in broad agreement with experiment. The effects of Al, Cr and Si on the oxidation resistance of this class of alloy have been rationalised.

  • 7.
    Segersäll, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Moverare, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Leidermark, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Simonsson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Low-Cycle Fatigue Behaviour of a Ni-Based Single-Crystal Superalloy2014In: Advanced Materials Research, ISSN 1022-6680, E-ISSN 1662-8985, Vol. 891-892, p. 416-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, low-cycle fatigue (LCF) tests at 500 degrees C in the < 001 >, < 011 > and < 111 > directions have been performed for the Ni-based single-crystal superalloy MD2. All tests were carried out in strain control with R-is an element of = -1. The < 001 > direction has the lowest stiffness of the three directions and also shows the best fatigue properties in this study followed by the < 011 > and < 111 > directions, respectively. It is well recognised that Ni-based single-crystal superalloys show a tension/compression asymmetry in yield strength and this study shows that a tension/compression asymmetry is also present during LCF conditions. At mid-life, the < 001 > direction generally has a higher stress in tension than in compression, while the opposite is true for the < 011 > direction. For the < 111 > direction the asymmetry is found to be strain range dependent. The < 011 > and < 111 > directions show a cyclic hardening behaviour when comparing cyclic stress-strain curves with monotonic stress-strain curves. In addition, the < 011 > and < 111 > directions show a serrated yielding behaviour for a number of cycles while the yielding of the < 001 > direction is more stable.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf