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  • 1.
    Andersson, Claes
    et al.
    Malmo Univ, Sweden.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Trust in academic management during the COVID-19 pandemic: longitudinal effects on mental health and academic self-efficacy2024In: Cogent Education, E-ISSN 2331-186X, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 2327779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In higher education, students' trust in the university management may affect both mental health and academic self-efficacy. This longitudinal study, conducted during the most challenging course of the COVID-19 pandemic, uses multinomial regression and causal inference to estimate the effects of students' trust in their universities' strategies for managing the pandemic, on students' self-reported changes in mental health and academic self-efficacy. The analyzed sample (N = 2796) was recruited through online advertising and responded to a baseline online survey in the late spring of 2020, with two follow-up surveys five and ten months later. Results show that positive trust in university management of the pandemic protected against experiencing one's mental health and academic self-efficacy as worse rather than unchanged, both five and ten months after the baseline assessment. The findings emphasize the importance of developing and maintaining trust-building measures between academia and students to support students' mental health and academic self-efficacy in times of uncertainty.

  • 2.
    Forsell, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Teachers’ perceived challenges in group work assessment2021In: Cogent Education, E-ISSN 2331-186X, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 1886474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Group work assessment is a challenging and complex practice for teachers. This study focuses on the challenges teachers perceive before and after participating in a group work assessment project that emphasizes individual assessment. By conducting a qualitative thematic analysis of twelve interviews with six teachers at upper secondary schools in Sweden, several challenges could be identified. The most prominent challenge concerning group work assessment is how to discern students’ individual performance within groups. This challenge has consequences for both the validity and the fairness of the assessment. Further, teachers experienced challenges with (un)fairness in group work assessment, in terms of both achieving fairness and having to deal with students’ emotions regarding perceived unfairness. The results also show how teachers perceive inadequate conditions, such as a lack of time and methods, and generate challenges in their practice, which is also related to reliability.

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  • 3.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology.
    Forsberg, Camilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning.
    Teachers’ perspectives on factors influencing the school climate: A constructivist grounded theory case study2023In: Cogent Education, E-ISSN 2331-186X, Vol. 10, no 2, article id 2245171Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore and analyse teachers’ perspectives on factors influencing the school climate, to better understand teachers’ everyday efforts in influencing the school climate, including obstacles they might experience. Bronfenbrenner’s social-ecological theory was utilized as the overarching theoretical perspective. Data were collected by means of 14 semi-structured focus group interviews with 73 teachers from two compulsory schools in southeast Sweden. Findings revealed that teachers experienced the school climate as both positively and negatively influenced by a number of internal and external factors, perceived as influenceable or uninfluenceable. According to the teachers, four types of factors affected the quality of the school climate: social processes and values in school (i.e. influenceable internal factors), school premises and support structures (i.e. uninfluenceable internal factors, external relations (i.e. influenceable external factors) and external means of control (i.e. uninfluenceable external factors). A grounded theory of teachers’ perceptions of factors influencing school were developed. Our conclusion is that the teachers talked about a multidimensional and malleable phenomenon, emanated by a complex interplay across multiple agents and contexts both within and outside the school, aligning with all domains and features and acting as preconditions for the school climate. 

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  • 4.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    Univ West, Sweden.
    Group work assessment intervention project - A methodological perspective2022In: Cogent Education, E-ISSN 2331-186X, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 2095885Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The assessment of individual knowledge and abilities should be frequently undertaken when learning is developed in interactions with other students, such as in group work and/or cooperative learning. Previous research reveals that group work assessment is a neglected research area, and this applies in particular to group work assessment interventions studies. The focus of this article is methodological, and its aim is to provide a reflective and critical account of a group work assessment intervention project, and the implications of the different choices made in this process. The intervention project that was scrutinized had a mixed-method longitudinal quasi-experimental design, and interventions in the form of shorter educational sessions were central to the project. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected, analyzed, and compiled. The methodological issues discussed and problematized were the importance of (a) establishing collaboration with teachers; (b) well-thought-out and delimited methodological choices, and subsequent consequences; and (c) including both teachers and students to secure successful effects of the interventions. As a result of the study, it was concluded that intervention could be beneficial as a means of increasing the scientific knowledge in relation to intervention studies, and also to the emerging discourse on group work assessment.

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  • 5.
    Thornberg, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Bjereld, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Caravita, Simona C.
    Univ Stavanger, Norway.
    Moral disengagement and bullying: Sex and age trends among Swedish students2023In: Cogent Education, E-ISSN 2331-186X, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 2203604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the fact that bullying has been consistently linked to moral disengagement among schoolchildren, research that distinguishes among the four loci of moral disengagement (cognitive restructuring, minimizing ones agentive role, distorting consequences, and victim attribution) to better understand bullying is scarce. The aim of this longitudinal study, conducted in Sweden, was to explore in both female and male students whether the four loci of moral disengagement are concurrently associated with bullying when students are around age 12 and then again around age 14, and whether the four loci of moral disengagement in age 12 predict bullying at age 14. The current paper is based on data from 1,053 students who completed a questionnaire both in sixth and then, two years later, in eighth grade to collect self-reported data on moral disengagement, traditional school bullying perpetration, sex and age. According to the findings, concurrent associations between moral disengagement loci and bullying vary across age and sex, but cognitive restructuring was consistently related to bullying in all conditions. Cognitive restructuring was the only moral disengagement locus from grade six that significantly predicted bullying in grade eight, but not when controlling for bullying in grade six. The results indicate the need to individualize intervention actions to address moral disengagement in terms of sex and age.

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  • 6.
    Thornberg, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Forsberg, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Wänström, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The association between student-teacher relationship quality and school liking: A small-scale 1-year longitudinal study2023In: Cogent Education, E-ISSN 2331-186X, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 2211466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This 1-year longitudinal study examined the association between student-teacher relationship quality and school liking in a sample of 234 students from two public schools in Sweden, who completed an online questionnaire on two separate occasions. The age range was 9-15 years in Time 1 and 10-16 years in Time 2. A path analysis showed that students who were younger, liked their school more, and had more positive, warm, and supportive relationships with their teachers were more inclined to score high in school liking one year later. In addition, younger students and students who liked their school and had better relationships with their teachers at Time 1 were inclined to have better relationships with their teachers one year later.

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1 - 6 of 6
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