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  • 1.
    Gärtner, Manja
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. German Inst Econ Res DIW Berlin, Germany.
    The prosociality of intuitive decisions depends on the status quo2018In: Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics, ISSN 2214-8043, E-ISSN 2214-8051, Vol. 74, p. 127-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research came to contradictory conclusion about the prosocial nature of intuitive decisions, as compared to deliberate decisions. This paper proposes the prosociality of the status quo allocation as a determinant of the prosociality of intuitive decisions. I present results from two experiments (N = 1,649) that manipulate time pressure and elicit response times in a binary dictator game. One of the choices is prosocial while the other is pro-self. The status quo option is varied to be equal to the prosocial allocation in one treatment and the selfish allocation in a second treatment. In a third treatment, there is no status quo allocation. Time pressure is found to increase selfishness in treatments without a status quo and has no effect on choices in treatments with a status quo. However, the status quo systematically affects response times. Prosocial choices are made significantly faster than selfish choices under a prosocial status quo and selfish choices are made significantly faster than prosocial choices under a selfish status quo.

  • 2.
    Skagerlund, Kenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lind, Thérese
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Strömbäck, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Tinghög, Gustav
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Västfjäll, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Decis Res, OR USA.
    Financial literacy and the role of numeracy-How individuals attitude and affinity with numbers influence financial literacy2018In: Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics, ISSN 2214-8043, E-ISSN 2214-8051, Vol. 74, p. 18-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Being financially literate is an important life skill that is equally important for ones own sake as well as for society. Findings indicate that individuals are financially illiterate while interventions to increase the level of financial literacy are ineffective. The effect of financial literacy on financial behavior reported in correlation studies may be driven by some unknown third variable, such as individual cognitive ability. The current study investigated the role of cognitive and emotional factors in attaining financial literacy. In a representative sample of the general population, our regression models indicate that a central component of financial literacy can be traced to numeracy and the emotional attitude towards numbers (i. e. mathematics anxiety). Thus, a driving force behind becoming financially literate resides in the ability to understand numbers and having an emotional attitude towards numbers that does not interfere with an individuals daily engagement in activities involving mathematics and financial decisions.

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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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