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  • 1.
    Helske, Satu
    et al.
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylän yliopisto, Finland.
    Steele, Fiona
    London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.
    Kokko, Katja
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylän yliopisto, Finland.
    Räikkönen, Eija
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylän yliopisto, Finland.
    Eerola, Mervi
    University of Turku, Åbo, Finland.
    Partnership formation and dissolution over the life course: applying sequence analysis and event history analysis in the study of recurrent events2015In: Longitudinal and life course studies, ISSN 1124-9064, E-ISSN 1757-9597, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present two types of approach to the analysis of recurrent events for discretely measured data, and show how these methods can complement each other when analysing co-residential partnership histories. Sequence analysis is a descriptive tool that gives an overall picture of the data and helps to find typical and atypical patterns in histories. Event history analysis is used to make conclusions about the effects of covariates on the timing and duration of the partnerships. As a substantive question, we studied how family background and childhood socio-emotional characteristics were related to later partnership formation and stability in a Finnish cohort born in 1959. We found that high self-control of emotions at age 8 was related to a lower risk of partnership dissolution and for women a lower probability of repartnering. Child-centred parenting practices during childhood were related to a lower risk of dissolution for women. Socially active boys were faster at forming partnerships as men.

  • 2.
    Kelfve, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Univ Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fors, Stefan
    Univ Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Univ Stockholm, Sweden.
    Getting better all the time? Selective attrition and compositional changes in longitudinal and life course studies2017In: Longitudinal and life course studies, ISSN 1124-9064, E-ISSN 1757-9597, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 104-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Longitudinal surveys are valuable tools for investigating health and social outcomes across the life course. In such studies, selective mortality leads to changes in the social composition of the sample, but little is known about how selective survey participation affects the sample composition, in addition to the selective mortality. In the present paper, we followed a Swedish cohort sample over six waves 1968-2011. For each wave we recalculated the distribution of baseline characteristics in the sample among i) the sample still alive and ii) the sample still alive and with complete follow-up. The results show that the majority of the compositional changes in the cohort were modest and driven mainly by mortality. However, for some characteristics, class in particular, the selection was considerable and in addition, was substantially compounded by survey non-participation. We suggest that sample selections should be taken into account when interpreting the results of longitudinal studies, in particular when researching social inequalities.

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