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  • 1.
    Hultkvist, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Holm, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Vánky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rise and fall of NT-proBNP in aortic valve intervention.2018In: Open heart, E-ISSN 2053-3624, Vol. 5, no 1, article id e000739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To describe the dynamics of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) from preoperative evaluation to 6-month follow-up in patients undergoing aortic valve intervention, and to evaluate NT-proBNP with regard to 1-year mortality.

    Methods: At preoperative evaluation, we prospectively included 462 patients accepted for aortic valve intervention. The median time to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR; n=336) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI; n=126) was 4 months. NT-proBNP was measured at enrolment for preoperative evaluation, on the day of surgery, postoperatively on day 1, day 3 and at the 6-month follow-up. Subgroups of patients undergoing SAVR with aortic regurgitation and aortic stenosis with and without coronary artery bypass were also analysed.

    Results: NT-proBNP remained stable in all subgroups during the preoperative waiting period, but displayed a substantial transient early postoperative increase with a peak on day 3 except in the TAVI group, which peaked on day 1. At the 6-month follow-up, NT-proBNP had decreased to or below the preoperative level in all groups. In the SAVR group, NT-proBNP preoperatively and on postoperative days 1 and 3 revealed significant discriminatory power with regard to 1-year mortality (area under the curve (AUC)=0.79, P=0.0001; AUC=0.71, P=0.03; and AUC=0.79, P=0.002, respectively). This was not found in the TAVI group, which had higher levels of NT-proBNP both preoperatively and at the 6-month follow-up compared with the SAVR group.

    Conclusions: The dynamic profile of NT-proBNP differed between patients undergoing TAVI and SAVR. NT-proBNP in the perioperative course was associated with increased risk of 1-year mortality in SAVR but not in TAVI.

  • 2.
    Jiang, Huiqi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Sun Yat-sen University of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, China.
    Vánky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hultkvist, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Holm, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Yang, Yanqi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Sun Yat-sen University of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, China.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    NT-proBNP and postoperative heart failure in surgery for aortic stenosis2019In: Open heart, E-ISSN 2053-3624, Vol. 6, no 1, article id UNSP e001063Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Postoperative heart failure (PHF) after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis (AS) may initially appear mild and transient but has serious long-term consequences. Methods to assess PHF are not well documented. We studied the association between N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and PHF after AVR for AS.

    Methods This is a prospective, observational, longitudinal study of 203 patients undergoing elective first-time AVR for AS. Plasma NT-proBNP was assessed at preoperative evaluation, the day before surgery, and the first (POD1) and third postoperative morning. A clinical endpoints committee, blinded to NT-proBNP results, used prespecified haemodynamic criteria to diagnose PHF. The mean follow-up was 8.6±1.1 years.

    Results No patient with PHF (n=18) died within 30 days after surgery, but PHF was associated with poor long-term survival (HR 3.01, 95% CI 1.45 to 6.21, p=0.003). NT-proBNP was significantly higher in patients with PHF only on POD1 (6415 (3145–11 220) vs 2445 (1540–3855) ng/L, p<0.0001). NT-proBNP POD1 provided good discrimination of PHF (area under the curve=0.82, 95% CI 0.72 to 0.91, p<0.0001; best cut-off 5290 ng/L: sensitivity 63%, specificity 85%). NT-proBNP POD1 ≥5290 ng/L identified which patients with PHF carried a risk of poor long-term survival, and PHF with NT-proBNP POD1 ≥ 5290 ng/L emerged as a risk factor for long-term mortality in the multivariable Cox regression (HR 6.20, 95% CI 2.72 to 14.1, p<0.0001).

    Conclusions The serious long-term consequences associated with PHF after AVR for AS were confirmed. NT-proBNP level on POD1 aids in the assessment of PHF and identifies patients at particular risk of poor long-term survival.

  • 3.
    Löfman, Ida
    et al.
    Huddinge, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Szummer, Karolina
    Huddinge, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hagerman, Inger
    Huddinge, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lund, Lars H
    Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Huddinge, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Prevalence and prognostic impact of kidney disease on heart failure patients.2016In: Open heart, E-ISSN 2053-3624, Vol. 3, no 1, article id e000324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim was to determine the prevalence of different degrees of kidney dysfunction and to examine their association with short-term and long-term outcomes in a large unselected contemporary heart failure population and some of its subgroups. We examined to what extent the different cardiac conditions and their severity contribute to the prognostic value of kidney dysfunction in heart failure.

    DESIGN: We studied 47 716 patients in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry. Patients were divided into five renal function strata based on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation. The adjusted association between kidney function and outcome was examined by Cox regression.

    RESULTS: 51% of the patients had eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and 11% had eGFR <30. There was increasing mortality with decreasing kidney function regardless of age, presence of diabetes, New York Heart Association NYHA class, duration of heart failure and haemoglobin levels. The risk HR (95% CI) persisted after adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics, severity of heart disease, and medical treatment: eGFR 60-89: 0.86 (0.79 to 0.95); eGFR 30-59: 1.13 (1.03 to 1.24); eGFR 15-29: 1.85 (1.67 to 2.07); and eGFR <15: 2.96 ([2.53 to -3.47)], compared with eGFR ≥90.

    CONCLUSIONS: Kidney dysfunction is common and strongly associated with short-term and long-term outcomes in patients with heart failure. This strong association was evident in all age groups, regardless of NYHA class, duration of heart failure, haemoglobin level, and presence/absence of diabetes mellitus. After adjusting for differences in baseline data, aetiology and severity of heart disease and treatment, the strong association remained.

  • 4.
    Sandstrom, Anette
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Camilla
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Rinnstrom, Daniel
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Engstrom, Gunnar
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Dellborg, Mikael
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thilen, Ulf
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Sorensson, Peder
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Christersson, Christina
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Johansson, Bengt
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Factors associated with health-related quality of life among adults with tetralogy of Fallot2019In: Open heart, E-ISSN 2053-3624, Vol. 6, no 1, article id UNSP e000932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Due to improved care, the numbers of patients with tetralogy of Fallot (ToF) are increasing. However, long-term morbidity and need for reinterventions are concerns and also address issues of quality of life (QoL). Methods Patients with ToF and valid EuroQol-5 dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D) were identified in the national Swedish register on congenital heart disease. EQ5D index was calculated and dichotomised into best possible health-related QoL (EQ-5D index = 1) or differed from 1. Results 288 patients met the criteria and were analysed. Univariate logistic regression showed a positive association between New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I (OR 8.32, 95% CI 3.80 to 18.21), physical activity amp;gt; 3 h/ week (OR 3.34, 95% CI 1.67 to 6.66) and a better right ventricular function (OR 2.56, 95% CI 1.09 to 6.02). A negative association between symptoms (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.42), cardiovascular medication (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.53), age (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.96 to 0.99) and EQ-5D index was observed. In multivariate logistic regression, NYHA I (OR 7.28, 95% CI 3.29 to 16.12) and physical activity amp;gt; 3 h/ week (OR 2.27, 95% CI 1.07 to 4.84) remained associated with best possible health-related QoL. Replacing NYHA with symptoms in the model yielded similar results. Conclusion In this registry study, self-reported physical activity, staff-reported NYHA class and absence of symptoms were strongly associated with best possible health-related QoL measured by EQ-5D. Physical activity level is a potential target for intervention to improve QoL in this population but randomised trials are needed to test such a hypothesis.

  • 5.
    Szummer, Karolina
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Evans, Marie
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carrero, Juan Jesus
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Benson, Lina
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lund, Lars H
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Comparison of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration, the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study and the Cockcroft-Gault equation in patients with heart failure2017In: Open heart, E-ISSN 2053-3624, Vol. 4, no 2, article id e000568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: It is unknown how the creatinine-based renal function estimations differ for dose adjustment cut-offs and risk prediction in patients with heart failure.

    METHOD AND RESULTS: The renal function was similar with the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) (median 59 mL/min/1.73 m2, IQR 42 to 77) and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study (MDRD) (59 mL/min/1.73 m2, IQR 43 to 75) and slightly lower with the Cockcroft-Gault (CG) equation (57 mL/min, IQR 39 to 82). Across the commonly used renal function stages, the CKD-EPI and the MDRD classified patients into the same stage in 87.2% (kappa coefficient 0.83, p<0.001); the CKD-EPI and the CG equation agreed in 52.3% (kappa coefficient 0.39, p<0.001). Hence, a differing number of patients will receive dose adjustment depending on which formula is used as cut-off. The CG equation predicted worse prognosis better (c-statistics 0.740, 95% CI 0.734 to 0.746) than CKD-EPI (0.697, 95% CI 0.690 to 0.703, p<0.001) and MDRD (0.680, 95% CI 0.734 to 0.746). Using net reclassification improvement (NRI), the CG identified 12.8% more patients at higher risk of death as compared with the CKD-EPI equation. Patients registered in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry (n= 40 736) with standardised creatinine values between 2000 and 2012 had their renal function estimated with the CKD-EPI, the MDRD and the CG. Agreement between the formulas was compared for categories. Prediction of death was assessed with c-statistics and with NRI.

    CONCLUSION: The choice of renal function estimation formula has clinical implications and differing results at various cut-off levels. For prognosis, the CG predicts mortality better than the CKD-EPI and MDRD.

  • 6.
    Östman-Smith, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Gunnar
    Department of Womens and Childrens Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rydberg, Annika
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Unit of Pediatrics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Larsson, Per
    Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Uppsala University Childrens Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fernlund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Pediatric Heart Center, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Predictors of risk for sudden death in childhood hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: the importance of the ECG risk score2017In: Open heart, E-ISSN 2053-3624, Vol. 4, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To establish which risk factors are predictive for sudden death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) diagnosed in childhood.

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