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  • 1.
    Dhanani, Jayesh A
    et al.
    Faculty of Medicine, UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. jadhanani@hotmail.com; Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. jadhanani@hotmail.com; Critical Care Research Group, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Cohen, Jeremy
    Faculty of Medicine, UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital, Brisbane, Australia.
    Parker, Suzanne L
    Faculty of Medicine, UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Chan, Hak-Kim
    Advanced Drug Delivery Group, Faculty of Pharmacy, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Tang, Patricia
    Advanced Drug Delivery Group, Faculty of Pharmacy, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Ahern, Benjamin J
    Faculty of Science, School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, Australia.
    Khan, Adeel
    Faculty of Science, School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, Australia.
    Bhatt, Manoj
    Department of Nuclear Medicine and Specialised PET Services Queensland, Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital, Herston, Queensland, Australia; School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia.
    Goodman, Steven
    Department of Nuclear Medicine and Specialised PET Services Queensland, Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital, Herston, Queensland, Australia.
    Diab, Sara
    Critical Care Research Group, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Chaudhary, Jivesh
    Critical Care Research Group, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Lipman, Jeffrey
    Faculty of Medicine, UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital, Brisbane, Australia; Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Wallis, Steven C
    Faculty of Medicine, UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Barnett, Adrian
    Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation and School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Brisbane, Australia.
    Chew, Michelle S
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Fraser, John F
    Critical Care Research Group, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Roberts, Jason A
    Faculty of Medicine, UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital, Brisbane, Australia; Centre for Translational Anti-infective Pharmacodynamics, School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Department of Pharmacy, Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital, Brisbane, Australia.
    A research pathway for the study of the delivery and disposition of nebulised antibiotics: an incremental approach from in vitro to large animal models2018In: Intensive Care Medicine Experimental, ISSN 1646-2335, E-ISSN 2197-425X, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nebulised antibiotics are frequently used for the prevention or treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia. Many factors may influence pulmonary drug concentrations with inaccurate dosing schedules potentially leading to therapeutic failure and/or the emergence of antibiotic resistance. We describe a research pathway for studying the pharmacokinetics of a nebulised antibiotic during mechanical ventilation using in vitro methods and ovine models, using tobramycin as the study antibiotic.

  • 2.
    Walther, Sten
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Kristensson, M.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Influence of income and education on outcomes of intensive care in a healthcare system with full universal health insurance - a nationwide analysis of individual-level data2019In: Intensive Care Medicine Experimental, ISSN 1646-2335, E-ISSN 2197-425X, Vol. 7, no Supplement 3, article id 000224Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION. Most patients admitted to intensive care are discharged to a general ward in the same hospital, but some patients require transfer to another hospital. Indications for interhospital transfers (IHT) include referral for specialist treatment, lack of intensive care beds at the referring ICU and repatriation to ICU in home hospital [1].

    OBJECTIVES. To review mortality of ICU-patients undergoing IHT and analyse whether different indications for transfer render different mortalities.

    METHODS. Retrospective cohort register study using the Swedish Intensive Care Registry (SIR) during 2016-2018. The SIR collects data from 98.8% of Swedish ICUs including data on discharge from ICUs to other hospitals/ICUs. Transfers were divided into three categories: transfer due to medical reasons, lack of ICU beds or repatriation to ICU in home hospital. We analysed odds ratios (ORs) for dying within 30 days after discharge from ICU using risk adjusted (SAPS3 score) multi-level mixed effect logistic regression with ICUs as random effect.

    RESULTS. We identified 12,356 patients who were discharged to another ICU and hospital, i.e. inter-hospital transfers. The unadjusted mortality 30 days after IHT was 17.2 % compared to 12.4 % if discharged to ward in the same hospital. Mortality after IHT varied with the cause of discharge (Figure).Main diagnoses for transfer due to specialist treatment were subarachnoid haemorrhage, head injury and multi-trauma whilst for lack of ICU beds post cardiac arrest, respiratory failure and pneumonia dominated. Risk adjusted analysis showed a significantly increased risk of dying after discharge due to lack of ICU-beds in comparison with other reasons for IHTs

    CONCLUSION. The adjusted risk of dying within 30 days after interhospital transfer was greater among critically ill patients when the transfer was due to lack of beds in the referring ICU. The increased mortality lingered for at least 6 months underlining the importance to identify causes and intervene to avoid unnecessary loss of life.

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